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Chip R
01-22-2008, 10:44 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/22/oscar.list/index.html?eref=yahoo

Highlifeman21
01-22-2008, 11:09 AM
Transformers better win something, that's all I'm sayin...

RichRed
01-22-2008, 11:51 AM
I don't have time to read the list. How many nominations did Good Luck Chuck get?

Chip R
01-22-2008, 12:02 PM
I don't have time to read the list. How many nominations did Good Luck Chuck get?

-3

BuckeyeRed27
01-22-2008, 12:54 PM
I've actually seen all the best picture nominations this year. My favorite from an entertainment stand point was Michael Clayton. That is just a sweet movie, but I don't think it will win. Daniel Day Lewis will win best actor for There Will Be Blood, but it won't win best movie. Atonement is excellent and is my pick. No Country For Old Men I hated and I will be really pissed if it wins.

TC81190
01-22-2008, 01:02 PM
Nothing for 3:10 to Yuma and one for American Gangster. Rough, Denzell Washington should've been nominated for Best Actor for his role in that movie, and the movie itself should've been nominated for Best Picture...

BuckeyeRed27
01-22-2008, 01:29 PM
Nothing for 3:10 to Yuma and one for American Gangster. Rough, Denzell Washington should've been nominated for Best Actor for his role in that movie, and the movie itself should've been nominated for Best Picture...

I think it suffered from being a similar move to The Departed and not nearly as good.

3:10 to Yuma is a good movie, but its not an award type movie. It was a really good western, but nothing below the surface really.

BoxingRed
01-22-2008, 02:51 PM
I've No Country For Old Men I hated and I will be really pissed if it wins.

Really? I am not sure I haven't seen a better movie since Children of Men. I thought it was absolutely fantastic. As one of my friends said, "I just didn't want it to end."

BuckeyeRedleg
01-22-2008, 02:52 PM
Saw No Country For Old Men last night.

Great movie for 75%, but the last 25% was frustrating.

I think may need to read the book to understand the whole point.

BoxingRed
01-22-2008, 03:02 PM
Saw No Country For Old Men last night.

Great movie for 75%, but the last 25% was frustrating.

I think may need to read the book to understand the whole point.

I have heard several really interesting interpretations of No Country for Old Men and all of them seemed very valid. That, to me, is the mark of great art.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-22-2008, 03:15 PM
I have heard several really interesting interpretations of No Country for Old Men and all of them seemed very valid. That, to me, is the mark of great art.

I thought it was a beautifully done film. I was just shocked by the ending, as it left me waiting for more. I don't need happy endings, I was just sort of confused by it.

It will be one that I'll have to watch again and, like I said, maybe read the book.

RosieRed
01-22-2008, 03:31 PM
I thought it was a beautifully done film. I was just shocked by the ending, as it left me waiting for more. I don't need happy endings, I was just sort of confused by it.

It will be one that I'll have to watch again and, like I said, maybe read the book.


The book is absolutely fantastic, IMO. The character of the sheriff is extremely well written.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-22-2008, 03:36 PM
The book is absolutely fantastic, IMO. The character of the sheriff is extremely well written.

I assume he had a much larger role in the book, right? I guess that's what confused me with the movie. The story is really about him, but you really don't get deep into his character until the end.

MrCinatit
01-22-2008, 03:38 PM
Once again, the cinematic genius which is Larry The Cable guy is denied.

Danny Serafini
01-22-2008, 04:34 PM
As usual, I haven't seen a single movie that was nominated. In fact I haven't even heard of the majority of them. But I did get a chuckle out of the fact that Norbit received a nomination.

westofyou
01-22-2008, 04:37 PM
As usual, I haven't seen a single movie that was nominated. In fact I haven't even heard of the majority of them. But I did get a chuckle out of the fact that Norbit received a nomination.

This is the first time in at least 32 years that I have yet to see any of the nominated films... which is just plain weak on my part

FIRELEFT
01-22-2008, 04:40 PM
The big question is, will the Oscars just be announced or will there be a show.

*BaseClogger*
01-22-2008, 04:45 PM
go Juno! The only one I have seen and the only one I likely would have enjoyed...

MrCinatit
01-22-2008, 04:54 PM
This is the first time in at least 32 years that I have yet to see any of the nominated films... which is just plain weak on my part

Same here.
With all fairness, though, I believe only one has been released on DVD, which is basically the only way I can get a chance to watch a good movie in this dead end town. Unless I want to watch National Treasure for seven weeks in a row.

TC81190
01-22-2008, 04:58 PM
Glad to see No Country for Old Men receive so many nominations, though; one of greatest movies I've ever seen.

Javy Pornstache
01-22-2008, 05:13 PM
Another big Old Country fan here... the book was great, and I was most pleased with the movie when seeing it opening night. Great performances from Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin, Woody Harrelson... but the real star turn was from Javier Bardem.

Chip R
01-22-2008, 05:23 PM
Once again, the cinematic genius which is Larry The Cable guy is denied.


Well, you know how the Academy gives short shrift to comedies.

Dom Heffner
01-22-2008, 06:17 PM
Here is Roger Ebert's review of "No Country for Old Men." I found it to be spot on. One of the best films I have ever seen.

No Country for Old Men


/ / / November 8, 2007

By Roger Ebert

The movie opens with the flat, confiding voice of Tommy Lee Jones. He describes a teenage killer he once sent to the chair. The boy had killed his 14-year-old girlfriend. The papers described it as a crime of passion, "but he tolt me there weren't nothin' passionate about it. Said he'd been fixin' to kill someone for as long as he could remember. Said if I let him out of there, he'd kill somebody again. Said he was goin' to hell. Reckoned he'd be there in about 15 minutes."

These words sounded verbatim to me from No Country for Old Men, the novel by Cormac McCarthy, but I find they are not quite. And their impact has been improved upon in the delivery. When I get the DVD of this film, I will listen to that stretch of narration several times; Jones delivers it with a vocal precision and contained emotion that is extraordinary, and it sets up the entire film, which regards a completely evil man with wonderment, as if astonished that that such a merciless creature could exist.

The man is named Anton Chigurh. No, I don't know how his last name is pronounced. Like many of the words McCarthy uses, particularly in his masterpiece Suttree, I think it is employed like an architectural detail: The point is not how it sounds or what it means, but the brushstroke it adds to the sentence. Chigurh (Javier Bardem) is a tall, slouching man with lank, black hair and a terrifying smile, who travels through Texas carrying a tank of compressed air and killing people with a cattle stungun. It propels a cylinder into their heads and whips it back again.

Chigurh is one strand in the twisted plot. Ed Tom Bell, the sheriff played by Jones, is another. The third major player is Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin), a poor man who lives with his wife in a house trailer, and one day, while hunting, comes across a drug deal gone wrong in the desert. Vehicles range in a circle like an old wagon train. Almost everyone on the scene is dead. They even shot the dog. In the back of one pickup are neatly stacked bags of drugs. Llewelyn realizes one thing is missing: the money. He finds it in a briefcase next to a man who made it as far as a shade tree before dying.

The plot will involve Moss attempting to make this $2 million his own, Chigurh trying to take it away from him and Sheriff Bell trying to interrupt Chigurh's ruthless murder trail. We will also meet Moss' childlike wife, Carla Jean (Kelly Macdonald); a cocky bounty hunter named Carson Wells (Woody Harrelson); the businessman (Stephen Root) who hires Carson to track the money after investing in the drug deal, and a series of hotel and store clerks who are unlucky enough to meet Chigurh.

"No Country for Old Men" is as good a film as the Coen brothers, Joel and Ethan, have ever made, and they made "Fargo." It involves elements of the thriller and the chase but is essentially a character study, an examination of how its people meet and deal with a man so bad, cruel and unfeeling that there is simply no comprehending him. Chigurh is so evil, he is almost funny sometimes. "He has his principles," says the bounty hunter, who has knowledge of him.

Consider another scene in which the dialogue is as good as any you will hear this year. Chigurh enters a rundown gas station in the middle of wilderness and begins to play a word game with the old man (Gene Jones) behind the cash register, who becomes very nervous. It is clear they are talking about whether Chigurh will kill him. Chigurh has by no means made up his mind. Without explaining why, he asks the man to call the flip of a coin. Listen to what they say, how they say it, how they imply the stakes. Listen to their timing. You want to applaud the writing, which comes from the Coen brothers, out of McCarthy.

The $2 million turns out to be easier to obtain than to keep. Moss tries hiding in obscure hotels. Scenes are meticulously constructed in which each man knows the other is nearby. Moss can run but he can't hide. Chigurh always tracks him down. He shadows him like his doom, never hurrying, always moving at the same measured pace, like a pursuer in a nightmare.

This movie is a masterful evocation of time, place, character, moral choices, immoral certainties, human nature and fate. It is also, in the photography by Roger Deakins, the editing by the Coens and the music by Carter Burwell, startlingly beautiful, stark and lonely. As McCarthy does with the Judge, the hairless exterminator in his "Blood Meridian" (Ridley Scott's next film), and as in his "Suttree," especially in the scene where the riverbank caves in, the movie demonstrates how pitiful ordinary human feelings are in the face of implacable injustice. The movie also loves some of its characters, and pities them, and has an ear for dialog not as it is spoken but as it is dreamed.

Many of the scenes in "No Country for Old Men" are so flawlessly constructed that you want them to simply continue, and yet they create an emotional suction drawing you to the next scene. Another movie that made me feel that way was "Fargo." To make one such film is a miracle. Here is another.

redsmetz
01-22-2008, 10:30 PM
I've actually seen all the best picture nominations this year. My favorite from an entertainment stand point was Michael Clayton. That is just a sweet movie, but I don't think it will win. Daniel Day Lewis will win best actor for There Will Be Blood, but it won't win best movie. Atonement is excellent and is my pick. No Country For Old Men I hated and I will be really pissed if it wins.

I've only seen Michael Clayton and Juno. At the beginning of the movie Michael Clayton, before you even seen Tom Wilkinson, his dialogue was so incredible. I turned to my wife and said he would be nominated for this performance. I thought the movie overall was gripping, with good performances.

I was glad to see the song from the movie Once was nominated. I loved that movie too.

Highlifeman21
01-22-2008, 11:59 PM
This is the first time in at least 32 years that I have yet to see any of the nominated films... which is just plain weak on my part

Get your act together, WOY.

You're better than that.

FWIW, this is the first time in 11 years for me I haven't seen any of them.

BuckeyeRed27
01-23-2008, 12:11 AM
Really? I am not sure I haven't seen a better movie since Children of Men. I thought it was absolutely fantastic. As one of my friends said, "I just didn't want it to end."

I think this movie falls into the Napolean Dynamite hype category. A below average movie that everyone says is really good because other people say its really good. The ending was poorly done. It doesn't flow well for much of the middle of the movie. Tommy Lee Jones character was just confusing. I didn't get Woody's character. Just way to many problems and I was truely dissapointed with this movie.

I loved Children of Men though.

Javy Pornstache
01-23-2008, 10:16 AM
The ending to it was awesome. It doesn't have to be cut and dry and fluffy like some people I know wanted it to be who disagreed with the ending. It was perfectly crafted for the story. I know I certainly don't think it's good just because "other people people say it's really good".

MrCinatit
01-23-2008, 03:42 PM
Well, you know how the Academy gives short shrift to comedies.

Hold the phone here...those were supposed to be comedies?
That changes everything.




In all seriousness, a coworker asked me a few weeks ago "Why all Oscar movies suck." He could not understand why movies like Old Country and There Will Be Blood were nominated "because they didn't make any money."
I pointed out that the top three movies last year were probably Pirates, Transformers and Spiderman. Yeah, I saw all three - but there were all simply fluff popcorn flicks. Sure Megan Fox is smoking hot - but she ain't Oscar worthy.
He simply could not understand why dollars did not equal best (though I did point out LOTR and Titanic were box office titans).
Unfortunately, this seems to be the point of view of many in the general public - and many do not get the Oscars simply because they do not get good movies.

Dom Heffner
01-23-2008, 05:08 PM
I think this movie falls into the Napolean Dynamite hype category. A below average movie that everyone says is really good because other people say its really good. The ending was poorly done. It doesn't flow well for much of the middle of the movie. Tommy Lee Jones character was just confusing. I didn't get Woody's character. Just way to many problems and I was truely dissapointed with this movie.


If you didn't like it, you didn't like it, but it is nowhere near a Napolean Dynamite hype type movie.

The critics loved No Country, Napolean's following was cult like. Big difference.

BuckeyeRed27
01-23-2008, 05:44 PM
If you didn't like it, you didn't like it, but it is nowhere near a Napolean Dynamite hype type movie.

The critics loved No Country, Napolean's following was cult like. Big difference.

I'm not saying the movies were similar. I'm saying the way they gained popularity is similar.

Dom Heffner
01-23-2008, 06:09 PM
I'm not saying the movies were similar. I'm saying the way they gained popularity is similar.


Totally saw what you were saying and the difference remains: No Country did not have some cult like following with moviegoers. It has been wonderfully received by nearly a unanimous number of critics and most poeple I have talked to love it.

Napolean Dynamite built a following with moviegoers and DVD renters, not critics- or at elast not the overwhelming support of critics that No Country has.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-23-2008, 07:19 PM
Totally saw what you were saying and the difference remains: No Country did not have some cult like following with moviegoers. It has been wonderfully received by nearly a unanimous number of critics and most poeple I have talked to love it.


I consider myself a pretty sophisticated moviegoer, but I'll be honest, NCFOM's ending frustrated me. I was just expecting something totally different. The Coen brothers had taken me on this incredible journey and then, all of a sudden, the movie went a different way. I had not read the book prior to seeing this movie, so I came into it with no expectations other than what I had heard - that it was a great movie.


SPOILER ALERT....don't read if you haven't seen the movie yet.

I just didn't understand the way they handled Llewellyn's death. After following this guy through this hell of a cat and mouse chase, you never see him die. You see Tommy Lee confirm the body in the morgue, but it's from a distance, so a part of me was hoping that there was a twist in this movie. The twist I was hoping for was maybe Tommy Lee identifying another body as Llewellyn's, so that he could help the guy and his girl start a new life with their money. Heck, I either expected that or for Tommy Lee to go down taking Bardem's character down with him. Then his girl is killed and Bardem gets in the accident. Tommy Lee then has two scenes where the point of the whole movie is delivered, but at the time I'm not thinking "Oh, yes, this must be it. Now this movie can end."

I understand the general theme now (in hindsight), but it still does not change the fact that initially I was caught off guard by the last 15-20 minutes of this film. Even had Moss died at the hands of Bardem's character, I would have been fine with it, but it never happened. There just seemed to be no closure at all.


I guess I wouldn't feel this strongly about it had I not totally loved this movie (up until the end). I'll read the book and watch it again, but I still can understand how sophisticated and non-sophisticated moviegoers alike would be disappointed initially.

Dom Heffner
01-23-2008, 07:31 PM
I guess I wouldn't feel this strongly about it had I not totally loved this movie (up until the end). I'll read the book and watch it again, but I still can understand how sophisticated and non-sophisticated moviegoers alike would be disappointed initially.

I think I agree that I initially was disappointed, but that's just because of expectations set up by having watched so many movies.

The book/film takes a pretty stark view of life and evil. Sometimes there aren't happy endings with tidy bows, and the good guys don't always win.

Like Ebert, I was moved by Jones' voice, and the scene with Josh Brolin's wife was a beautifully written heartbreaker.

WMR
01-23-2008, 07:33 PM
I'm not saying the movies were similar. I'm saying the way they gained popularity is similar.

That is ridiculous.

BuckeyeRed27
01-23-2008, 08:17 PM
That is ridiculous.

No. It's not.

I really do feel like some people just say they like the movie because other people do. Now not everybody is like that. Just like everybody that said ND was the funniest thing they have ever seen is like that, but in general I believe that to be true.

I think BRs summation is exactly how I felt except I didn't like the first 90 minutes as much as he did. And I really didn't like the character played by Woody Harrelson. I feel like it his character would have just been dropped or changed I probably would have at least given the movie some credit.

Javy Pornstache
01-24-2008, 04:18 AM
The book/film takes a pretty stark view of life and evil. Sometimes there aren't happy endings with tidy bows, and the good guys don't always win.

Like Ebert, I was moved by Jones' voice, and the scene with Josh Brolin's wife was a beautifully written heartbreaker.

Exactly, 100% spot on. That's the movie. It doesn't have some happy-go-lucky ending. Sometimes that's how life goes. If someone can't enjoy a movie without that, then this is probably not the film for them. But they'd be missing out on a hell of a film, and many others as well with that view.

westofyou
01-24-2008, 10:55 AM
Sometimes there aren't happy endings with tidy bows, and the good guys don't always win.

Those incidents would be what are covered in non hollywood film, specifically anything European.

I HATE the effect hollywood has had on the narrative film, hate it.

For a fine example look how they ended the Scarlet Letter and then look at the book.

BuckeyeRed27
01-24-2008, 11:19 AM
Exactly, 100% spot on. That's the movie. It doesn't have some happy-go-lucky ending. Sometimes that's how life goes. If someone can't enjoy a movie without that, then this is probably not the film for them. But they'd be missing out on a hell of a film, and many others as well with that view.

I just want to throw out there that in no way did I not like this movie because it didn't have a "happy go lucky" ending. Three of my favorite movies this year are Atonement, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and There Will Be Blood, all of which have anything but happy go lucky endings.

But I'm glad you and other people liked the movie. That's what movies are for and people will have different interpretations. I happen to think this movie has some massive failings and didn't enjoy it.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-24-2008, 11:30 AM
Exactly, 100% spot on. That's the movie. It doesn't have some happy-go-lucky ending. Sometimes that's how life goes. If someone can't enjoy a movie without that, then this is probably not the film for them. But they'd be missing out on a hell of a film, and many others as well with that view.

SPOILER's again......


Like I said, I didn't need a happy ending. Both Tommy Lee and Llewellyn could have been killed at the end for all I care. I just wanted some sort of closure to this awesome movie and it was somewhat vague in reference to how or if Llewellyn was truly killed. Heck, I was confused when the wife buried her mother. I wasn't sure how she died. I'm assuming cancer, but I wondered how much time could have gone by between her husband's death and her mother's funeral (the day Bardem arrived), and why Tommy Lee was not watching out for her.

I get the theme that evil exists in the world and Tommy Lee's character came from a generation where such mindless killing and greed was not as prevalent. Even though it was 1980 when the film took place, society by that time had deteriorated and he struggles with the notion that he can't do anything to stop it. He feels powerless in his old age. The thing is, that regardless of age, everyone should feel powerless to stop evil. So Bardem and Llewellyn's chase really is inconsequential in the grand scheme of things. It's simply a metaphor for evil and greed. Llewellyn appears to be a good man, but his greed for the money is what brings evil (Bardem's character) into his life and ultimately that greed prevents him from giving up and protecting practically the only thing good and innocent that he has in his life - his wife. Llewellyn goes from the hunter to the hunted and tries to go back to the hunter, but doesn't realize that his fate has been sealed already, because he has succumbed to evilness that he's running from. This is why I'm fine with the unhappy ending of him dying. It was appropriate. In fact, I'm fine with his wife dying as his selfishness, greed and pride are what put her in danger and brought evil into his own home. I just felt the ending was strangely put together. But, what do I know? These guys will probably win best picture.

I think the movie is also about fate as the coin flip scene with the gas station attendant and the two doors that Tommy Lee has to choose from at the end perfectly illustrates. I'm assuming he walked into the room that Bardem's character was not present in. That or the crazy killer spared him for some reason. Maybe it was his code. Evil needs guys like Tommy Lee's character (good) to exist so that it can always have something to triumph over. Ok, maybe I'm reaching here.

Then Bardem gets into the accident and walks away. Evil will always be present and never go away, even by chance (the freaky car accident). It will never go away until we take care of the greed and evil within ourselves.

MrCinatit
01-24-2008, 03:31 PM
Those incidents would be what are covered in non hollywood film, specifically anything European.

I HATE the effect hollywood has had on the narrative film, hate it.

For a fine example look how they ended the Scarlet Letter and then look at the book.

Re: The Natural.

westofyou
01-24-2008, 03:35 PM
Re: The Natural.

GREAT Book.

Fine movie, sappy ending.

RFS62
01-27-2008, 12:40 AM
Saw "No Country" today.

What a powerful film. Loved it.

It would have been ruined with a typical Hollywood ending.

SandyD
01-27-2008, 10:58 AM
I can see why the director's left out the final confrontation between Moss and Chigurh. In a film, at least, that scene would overshadow the Sheriff's discovery of the body, which IMO is the story's climax.

Was it told in the book?

westofyou
01-27-2008, 11:39 AM
Saw Juno... it was fabulous, quirky, but not over the top like a Wes Anderson film.

BuckeyeRed27
01-27-2008, 02:01 PM
Saw Juno... it was fabulous, quirky, but not over the top like a Wes Anderson film.

I thought Juno was great too. The dialouge is just really funny. I was still surprised it was nominated for best picture though. I thought Sweeny Todd or Charlie Wilson's War would have taken its spot.

TC81190
01-27-2008, 02:38 PM
I thought Juno was great too. The dialouge is just really funny. I was still surprised it was nominated for best picture though. I thought Sweeny Todd or Charlie Wilson's War would have taken its spot.

I was impressed with Sweeney Todd, and also think it should have gotten a Best Picture nod. Maybe it's just because I went in with low expectations (musicals really aren't my thing), but I really liked that film.

BuckWild03
01-27-2008, 03:03 PM
Sorry if I offend anyone but I think Juno is way overrated. I feel like they have one nomination for a film like this every year, an "independent" film if you will. Two years ago you saw it with Sideways (Which I love), last year you had Little Miss Sunshine which I also enjoyed, but Juno doesn't stack up to these films in my opinion. It was good, but not great. I felt bored with it at times. I'm also surprised that Michael Clayton got a nod. It was entertaining, and the ending is so very pleasing. Clooney was good as usual but won't win best actor. Overall the film was once again...good, but not great. There Will Be Blood is an excellent film but I would have liked it 100% better if it had been 45 minutes shorter. No Country is brilliant. Haven't seen Atonement so I can't make any judgements on that but as of right now, my vote goes to No Country for Old Men. Kind of disappointed that Into the Wild didn't get a nomination.

vaticanplum
01-27-2008, 03:36 PM
Sorry if I offend anyone but I think Juno is way overrated. I feel like they have one nomination for a film like this every year, an "independent" film if you will. Two years ago you saw it with Sideways (Which I love), last year you had Little Miss Sunshine which I also enjoyed, but Juno doesn't stack up to these films in my opinion. It was good, but not great. I felt bored with it at times. I'm also surprised that Michael Clayton got a nod. It was entertaining, and the ending is so very pleasing. Clooney was good as usual but won't win best actor. Overall the film was once again...good, but not great. There Will Be Blood is an excellent film but I would have liked it 100% better if it had been 45 minutes shorter. No Country is brilliant. Haven't seen Atonement so I can't make any judgements on that but as of right now, my vote goes to No Country for Old Men. Kind of disappointed that Into the Wild didn't get a nomination.

Completely agree. I thought Juno was terribly precious. Well-acted but fundamentally flawed.

Kind of defeats the purpose of recognizing independent film if the token independent darling is the same film with the same strengths and weaknesses year after year. It seems to me that they just pick the independent film with the most mainstream appeal. At the same time there are terrific mainstream films that get overlooked because they aren't quirky enough.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-27-2008, 03:41 PM
I can see why the director's left out the final confrontation between Moss and Chigurh. In a film, at least, that scene would overshadow the Sheriff's discovery of the body, which IMO is the story's climax.

Was it told in the book?

I thought Moss was killed by the Mexican mafia. Chigurh showed up afterwards to get the money Moss hid in his hotel room, right?

I didn't read the book, but that's the impression I got from the movie.

SandyD
01-27-2008, 03:51 PM
You're right. I forgot he saw the lock thing when he went back. But I still think the sheriff's discovery of the body was the important scene, and it would have been overshadowed by showing Moss's death.

cincinnati chili
02-10-2008, 03:27 AM
I saw Juno tonight, and didn't really see many flaws, other than a shameless extended product placement bit for Sunny Delight at the outset. If you can get past the fact that no 16 year old on the planet is that witty, I think you'll enjoy this movie. I found it more moving than I expected, probably because I so rarely sympathize with the poorly constructed characters you see these days.. Great acting. Great characters. Neato animation sequence in the opening credits.

I have no problem with this being the token indie film this year.

BuckeyeRed27
02-25-2008, 01:13 AM
No Country for Old Men wins pretty much everything as expected.
I'd say the only "upset" was Tilda Swenson winning best supporting actress for Michael Clayton.

John Stewart was hilarious BTW and I thought really made the show entertaining.

redsmetz
02-25-2008, 05:20 AM
No Country for Old Men wins pretty much everything as expected.
I'd say the only "upset" was Tilda Swenson winning best supporting actress for Michael Clayton.

John Stewart was hilarious BTW and I thought really made the show entertaining.

I'm not certain I'd say No Country for Old Men won pretty much everything - it won Best Picture and Director(s), plus the Best Supporting Actor among the majors, but everything else was spread around for the other acting awards.

My wife and I were pleased that the song from "Once" won the Best Song category and that Stewart had the Czech women songwriter come back out for her eloquent thanks.

And Stewart, even with that, brought the show in before midnight Eastern Time - wow!

GAC
02-25-2008, 05:44 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/22/oscar.list/index.html?eref=yahoo

Why is it when I try to open the above link I get nothing but a blank page? Bad sign for the Oscar nominees? :lol:

I can proudly say I've never watched the Oscars, or any type of Hollywood award shows. And to each his own I realize; but I could never understand why people do though.

I look forward to maybe seeing one or two of then when they come out on DVD and it only cost me a buck to rent them. ;)

BuckeyeRed27
02-25-2008, 12:31 PM
I can proudly say I've never watched the Oscars, or any type of Hollywood award shows. And to each his own I realize; but I could never understand why people do though.

I look forward to maybe seeing one or two of then when they come out on DVD and it only cost me a buck to rent them. ;)

Well if you never watched them then how can you be proud that you are missing them?


And very true Old Country didn't win everything, but it did do very well and that's what I meant by my comment.
I loved that Jon Stewart brought the lady from Once back out and let her give a great acceptance speach. Best part of the show by far.

forfreelin04
02-25-2008, 07:21 PM
I happened to see every film that was up for Best Picture this year. I think overall Atonement was the best film IMO. I think that was because I had low expectations going in. It was marketed as another Jane Austen style flick with Keira Knightly, in reality it was quite different. I thought the 5 minute long shot scene of the evacuation of Dunkirk was the best piece of cinema shown this past year.
TWBB was good, but like another poster mentioned it was 45 minutes too long. It basically jutted along for the middle of Plainfield's life than bolted towards the end. The last scene will live on forever like the Scarface shower scene, Casino's ballbats, and the recent Departed's elevator. It almost seemed the movie was a launching pad to show mainstream America the awesome talent of Daniel Day Lewis. The dude is seriously out of his mind. He's in a league by himself.

No Country was good and well adapted to screen by the Cohen Brothers. However, I've read the book, and they basically took Cormac McCarhty's exact words. I think the Oscar was a makeup for great previous Cohen brothers films like Fargo and O Brother Where Art Thou.

Rounding out the list: Juno was great. However, I agree the wit was far-fetched at times. However, Ellen Page delivered it with such smoothness you forget about it half way through the film.

Michael Clayton was solid too. Clooney is passable. His character lacked alot of personality. I don't know if that was Clooney playing Clooney or not. Tilda Swinton and Tom Wilkinson made the film great with solid supporting roles. Tony Gilroy did a masterful job directing a film with a basic storyline. He just portrayed it in a great way.

I think the best pictures for 2008, we're very good, but none of them stood out head and shoulders above the rest.

Oxilon
02-25-2008, 08:56 PM
It almost seemed the movie was a launching pad to show mainstream America the awesome talent of Daniel Day Lewis. The dude is seriously out of his mind. He's in a league by himself.

Agree but if mainstream America missed out on him in Gangs of New York, My Left Foot, and The Last of the Mohicans, I really doubt they're going to catch him in There Will Be Blood. Don't get me wrong, his performance in There Will Be Blood was mindblowing to say the least, but his roles as Bill 'The Butcher' Cutting, Christy Brown, and Hawkeye were equally impressive in my mind.

chicoruiz
02-25-2008, 09:05 PM
Juno was only OK for me; I prefer dialogue that sounds a little less scripted. And the score was like nails on a blackboard to me..

The best movies I saw this year were No Country, Atonement, and In The Valley of Elah. Elah didn't get much love besides Tommy Lee Jones, but I'm not sure it wasn't the best of the bunch. Extremely hard to watch, though. Anyone else see it?

GAC
02-25-2008, 09:06 PM
Well if you never watched them then how can you be proud that you are missing them?

I'd rather watch Castro take batting practice or Stanton warm up. ;)

Why watch, for the most part, a bunch of egotistical performers walk down a red carpet pimping for flashing cameras, and then scream "You like me, you really, really like me!" when they accept their awards? :lol:

I personally just don't get into it. It's like the NFL's Pro Bowl in Hawaii. I've never seen it either.

Redhook
02-25-2008, 09:53 PM
I'm guessing there are a few who've seen this movie. I saw it yesterday, prior to it winning the award.

I have to say it intrigued me. It had me wondering what in the world was going to happen. Plus, the characters were really good. The psychopath was awesome. I didn't find him scary (my wife did though....had to cover her eyes every time she saw him...lol), but he was very interesting. I loved his character.

I liked the movie a lot, until the ending. The ending left a bit out there for me. I need to see the movie again to figure out a few things.

Anyone else's thoughts on this interesting movie......

RFS62
02-25-2008, 10:02 PM
I loved it.

Including the ending.

Bip Roberts
02-25-2008, 10:32 PM
Thought it was intense as heck and the ending was very solid

Betterread
02-25-2008, 11:46 PM
I recommend this movie, with the proviso that it is viscerally violent and the tone of the movie is very negative and hopeless - morality is not easily fixed in this story.
I found this movie to be engrossing (in the first 20 minutes or so - until Llewellyn reaches some type of haven), suspenseful, apocalyptic, redemptive, and finally (after the movie was over and I thought about it) clinical and empty.
It is very well made, and it deals with the hunter/hunted aspect of the novel very faithfully. However, however haunting the voice and words of Tommy Lee Jones' sheriff - to my view (and this was my sense toward the novel as well) his despair was cheaply bought and therefore his beatiful final vision of his father waiting for him was a little overwrought.
This, combined with the Coen Bros. usual ironic distance made the movie seem (in retrospect) a little like a well-executed exercise in literary adaptation.

cincinnati chili
02-26-2008, 12:34 AM
My wife and I were pleased that the song from "Once" won the Best Song category and that Stewart had the Czech women songwriter come back out for her eloquent thanks.



I loved the movie and caught them in concert a couple months ago. Great night of music if you can catch them. I imagine the ticket is going to get a little tougher now. They tour under the name "The Swell Season."

http://www.ticketliquidator.com/tix/the-swell-season-events.aspx

BuckeyeRedleg
02-26-2008, 10:26 AM
Saw There Will be Blood last night.

Liked it better than No Country For Old Men.

Brilliant movie.

RichRed
02-26-2008, 04:58 PM
I loved the movie and caught them in concert a couple months ago. Great night of music if you can catch them. I imagine the ticket is going to get a little tougher now. They tour under the name "The Swell Season."

http://www.ticketliquidator.com/tix/the-swell-season-events.aspx

I agree about Once - great movie.

Chip R
02-26-2008, 05:03 PM
I agree about Once - great movie.


Yeah. I think I saw something about them being on Ovation TV this Thursday night.