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View Full Version : The Rich Rodriguez Divorce(Hats off to Mark Schlabach)



WVRed
01-29-2008, 10:18 PM
This is, IMO, the best article I have read to summarize the whole Rich Rodriguez-WVU situation. I couldn't believe I was reading this from ESPN of all places.

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/columns/story?columnist=schlabach_mark&id=3220002


MORGANTOWN, W. Va. -- Late last summer, when pressure was mounting on football coach Rich Rodriguez to sign his new contract with West Virginia, he received a telephone call from the state's governor.


"Rich, when are you going to sign your contract?" Joe Manchin III asked Rodriguez, according to a person familiar with the conversation.


"Don't you have more important things to worry about?" Rodriguez asked Manchin, whom the coach then considered a close friend.


"I never thought a football coach would make more money than the governor," Manchin said.


"Well, you only have to win once every four years," Rodriguez joked.



[+] EnlargeBob Donnan/US Presswire

Rich Rodriguez's frustration with the West Virginia athletic department contributed to his departure.


In the end, Rodriguez didn't win when it mattered most. With his team needing to beat 28-point underdog Pittsburgh in the regular-season finale to earn a chance to play for college football's national championship, the Mountaineers lost to the Panthers 13-9. The crushing home defeat sent Rodriguez into an emotional tailspin and magnified the problems he faced at West Virginia.


"That loss wore him out worse than anything I'd ever seen before," said Mike Smith, an auto dealer from Charleston, W. Va., who describes himself as a close friend of Rodriguez. "He'd only lost four games in two years. After that loss, he made a lot of decisions that were out of character. I just think that loss put him in a different state of mind. I don't think there's any question he rushed into some things."


Sixteen days after losing to Pittsburgh, Rodriguez was introduced as the new football coach at the University of Michigan. Immediately, Rodriguez became a pariah in the state he and his family considered home. He walked away from his alma mater only a few months after signing a one-year contract extension that called for him to coach the Mountaineers through the 2013 season.


Worse, Rodriguez left West Virginia before the Mountaineers' season had ended. West Virginia upset Oklahoma 48-28 in the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 2. Interim coach Bill Stewart, who worked as tight ends coach, special-teams coordinator and associate head coach under Rodriguez in 2007, was named the school's new coach the day after he guided the Mountaineers to perhaps the biggest victory in the program's history.


In a state where the Mountaineers are seemingly the only team that matters, Rodriguez's sudden departure was met with boiling resentment. The university sued Rodriguez to collect on a $4 million buyout clause in his contract. An unnamed university official accused the former coach of shredding players' academic files, and Calvin Magee, Rodriguez's offensive coordinator at WVU, claimed he wasn't considered for the Mountaineers' head coaching vacancy because he is black.


Rodriguez's parents, who live a short drive from the West Virginia campus, claim they were harassed by Mountaineers fans after their son left for Michigan. The highway sign declaring Grant Town, W.Va., as Rich Rodriguez's hometown was even removed.


"A strong commitment was made both ways, Rich to us and we to Rich," West Virginia athletic director Ed Pastilong said. "It was felt this would be a long and prosperous relationship. Now, less than a year later, there's a change. It got many fans upset. To add to that, he's an alumnus whose hometown is 20 to 30 miles from campus. All of those things added to the disappointment."


During the past few seasons, when Rodriguez built the Mountaineers into a national championship contender, he implored his players to "hold the rope." Who knew it would be the coach who dropped the knot?


"He told everybody, 'You're stuck with me and I'm not going anywhere,'" Smith said. "Loyalty is a big word in West Virginia. He preached that to his kids. He always told them to 'hold the rope' and he let it go."


Stewart, who still considers Rodriguez a close friend, said that both sides need to settle their differences and look to the future.


"What happened is a guy took a job," Stewart said. "It wasn't a tragic loss of life. It was a passing. It was a life-altering event for some of the players and the people involved. There needs to be closure. He is at Michigan and I'm at West Virginia."


Rodriguez's attorneys offered to pay West Virginia $1.5 million to buy out the final six years of his contract. Tom Flaherty, an attorney representing the university, said "the university has lived up to all its obligations under the contract, and the university expects him to live up to the $4 million that is owed." Even if the much-publicized case never sees a courtroom, both sides have suffered irreparable damage.


"They're acting like a jilted lover in a divorce case," said Marv Dobon, one of Rodriguez's Ohio-based attorneys. "They want a pound of flesh. Rich is gone and he's not coming back. He's a native-born Mountaineer and he doesn't want to hurt them."


"Everybody has taken sides and many believe Rich is a traitor," said an influential West Virginia booster who spoke on the condition of anonymity. "The endgame is the university is a big loser because the image of the university is tarnished, and that's sad."



AP Photo/Dale Sparks

West Virginia president Mike Garrison hasn't had much to smile about lately.


Correspondence between Rodriguez's representatives and university officials, obtained by ESPN.com through a freedom of information request, reveals that the former coach had become increasingly frustrated with a financially strapped athletic department with no clear chain of command and fractured interests. By the end of his tenure, Rodriguez wasn't even speaking to Pastilong and mostly communicated with university president Mike Garrison and Craig Walker, Garrison's chief of staff.


Rodriguez, through his agent, declined to comment on the circumstances of his departure.

E-mails between the sides also shows that the university had become impatient with Rodriguez. The coach had demanded control of virtually every facet of the West Virginia football program, from scheduling opponents to who watched the Mountaineers practice and who stood on the sideline during games.


In the end, Rodriguez's close friends say, it was easier for him to walk away than to stay and fight. And West Virginia officials didn't do much to try to keep him because they had grown tired of meeting his seemingly endless demands.


"It was the perfect storm for Michigan," Smith said. "Michigan was a little desperate for a coach, and Rich was kind of wavering a little bit from the Pitt loss. Somebody got ahold of him at the right time and everything fell into place for Michigan."


The storm had been brewing at West Virginia for months. After Rodriguez came close to leaving for Alabama after the 2006 season, West Virginia persuaded him to stay with an enhanced contract. Manchin orchestrated the new deal, which was financed mostly by contributions from many of the school's most influential boosters. At the time, Rodriguez was concerned mainly about his assistant coaches' salaries and the need for an improved playing field, locker room and academic center.


According to West Virginia officials, the school met each of Rodriguez's demands. The athletic department spent nearly $3.5 million to build a new academic center, the Milan Puskar Center, and nearly $1 million to replace the artificial playing surface at Mountaineer Field. A $4 million renovation of the team's locker room began shortly after the 2007 regular season ended.


The school also increased the salary pool for assistant coaches by $150,000 on July 1. The salary pool would have been increased an additional $50,000 in each subsequent year of his tenure, according to the contract Rodriguez signed with West Virginia on Aug. 24.


"In reality, all commitments were fulfilled by West Virginia," Pastilong said. "In fact, we exceeded what was requested for assistant coaches' salaries. We felt very good about our responsibilities and obligations and were comfortable regarding our focus to the football program."



[+] EnlargeJames Lang/US Presswire

Rich Rodriguez wanted control over everything from sideline passes to football camps and his own Web site.


But Rodriguez wanted more. Near the end of his latest contract negotiations with West Virginia, Rodriguez still had concerns about less tangible facets of the program. In an Aug. 27 e-mail to Garrison and Walker, Rodriguez's financial advisor, Mike Wilcox, wrote that the coach had no issues regarding the amount of his compensation or longevity of his contract. But, he added, Rodriguez "has issues with the operations of the football program, his need for total control for the football program and 'fairness.'"


Specifically, Wilcox said Rodriguez wanted "total control of the sideline ... both pregame and game sideline passes." Additionally, Rodriguez wanted his players to be able to keep their textbooks at the end of each semester and wanted better seating for football recruits at basketball games. Rodriguez wanted the school to waive a $5 admission fee for high school coaches to attend Mountaineers football games and wanted the program's summer football camps to be "run by a proprietorship solely owned by Rich."


More importantly, Rodriguez wanted to control the school's Football Enhancement Fund and 1100 Club, which Rodriguez established to solicit money from boosters to fund the Mountaineers' recruiting efforts. Rodriguez complained West Virginia had used the money donated to the 1100 Club for other purposes. In the e-mail to Garrison and Walker, Wilcox wrote: "Rich asked to look at expenses taken out and was told that they were for 'recruiting and related expenses.' ... It was agreed Rich would have complete control and sign off on all expenditures of these funds."


Rodriguez felt West Virginia needed to modernize its athletic department. He sought to launch his own Web site to generate more money to pay his assistant coaches, a potential enterprise that was met with much resistance from the administration.


Rodriguez also asked the university to cease rebroadcasting its football and basketball games on its own Mountaineer Sports Network (MSN) and sell the rebroadcast rights to regional networks. Because of West Virginia's recent success -- it won or tied for the Big East football championship in four of the past five seasons and played in a lucrative BCS bowl game twice during Rodriguez's seven-year tenure -- the coach and his representatives believed the school might generate millions of dollars by selling its radio and TV rights. Rodriguez also wanted the games rebroadcast regionally for more exposure.


In a Nov. 14 e-mail to Walker, Rodriguez's agent raised concerns about the university not addressing the coach's wishes. In the e-mail, Mike Brown wrote: "We both agree there is millions in revenue not being realized. Those revenues over time will allow WVU to remain competitive for Rich's services. I was hoping those revenue streams would be in place by 2008 and I think you felt the same. ... Why is this important? There is a projected opening at Texas A&M this year and Florida State next year. Rich's name is being mentioned heavily."


In February 2006, then-West Virginia president David Hardesty ordered the Mountaineer Athletic Club's Development Council to conduct an independent review of the athletic department. The council recommended 55 changes to the way the athletic department operated. Among the recommendations, the committee asked whether "it's possible that parts or all of [MSN] could be done less expensively by being outsourced. We spend nearly $2.7 million, for example, on MSN annually."


"They've left millions of dollars on the table in their unwillingness to license their broadcast rights," the West Virginia booster said. "It's because of a lack of good business plans. It's just a badly run business. It's an embarrassment to the university."


Pastilong, a former West Virginia football player, has worked nearly two decades as the school's athletics director. Pastilong and Manchin were college roommates at West Virginia.


"People are obviously aligned on one side or the other," one influential West Virginia booster said. "Rich became more and more frustrated with things that he perceived to be problems. Ed and the governor are friends. It transcends the governor's ability to make good decisions. Ed's his friend and he's going to stand behind him."



[+] EnlargeAP Photo/David Duprey

Gov. Joe Manchin's close involvement with the WVU athletic program is an issue for some.


Pastilong said Manchin's involvement in West Virginia athletics is welcomed.


"We have a very good governor," Pastilong said. "He's very active. He is involved. He is involved to the extent of being helpful. He's involved when he should be and when needed."


But Rodriguez became irritated by Manchin's involvement, according to people close to the former West Virginia coach. Even after Rodriguez's departure, at the Fiesta Bowl, Manchin was on the sideline during the game, slapping players' helmets and shoulder pads as they came off the field. Manchin also was involved in the search for Rodriguez's successor, even personally speaking to potential candidates.


"He's in a power position and he's making the decisions," the West Virginia booster said. "If he had his true calling in life, he probably wanted to be a college or pro football coach. He's getting to do that vicariously because he's the governor and he's important."


Manchin's relationship with WVU president Garrison also has been questioned. Garrison, 38, was a controversial successor to Hardesty, who retired last year. Garrison was a local attorney who earned undergraduate and law degrees from West Virginia, Garrison held several posts at the state capital in Charleston, most notably as chief of staff to former governor Bob Wise. In that position, Garrison was involved in the appointment process of five of the 17 members of the WVU board of governors. The board of governors ultimately chose Garrison over two other more long-standing academics.


"I think Garrison is a guy who wants to do well," the West Virginia booster said. "He is absolutely there at the behest of the governor. He was put there over the objections of the academics. I think at this point he is beholden to the governor and isn't strong enough in his credentials to stand on his own. If Joe Manchin called him and told him changes needed to be made in the athletic department, it would be done by sundown."


Garrison and Manchin declined ESPN's interview requests.


In the end, the only change made was Rodriguez leaving in a cloud of coal dust. After meeting with Michigan athletic director Bill Martin in Toledo, Ohio, on Dec. 14, Rodriguez returned to Morgantown. He met with Pastilong and Garrison in separate meetings the next day. Rodriguez asked if the university would address his concerns, and each man said they told him no.


"We made an extremely strong commitment less than one year earlier," Pastilong said. "It would have been very difficult to go beyond that. We were not in a position following our last contract negotiation to get into a bidding situation. We had made as strong of a commitment as possible."


So West Virginia's once-favorite son left. And his alma mater and home state are still coming to grips with his abrupt departure.


"We all want a good ending to situations of this kind and hopefully that will occur," Pastilong said. "It was a bit of a surprise, and we want to make sure we're established for success in the future."

ESPN's George Smith contributed to this story.



Mark Schlabach covers college football and men's college basketball for ESPN.com. You can contact him at schlabachma@yahoo.com.

Unassisted
01-29-2008, 11:22 PM
Manchin's relationship with WVU president Garrison also has been questioned. Garrison, 38, was a controversial successor to Hardesty, who retired last year. Garrison was a local attorney who earned undergraduate and law degrees from West Virginia, Garrison held several posts at the state capital in Charleston, most notably as chief of staff to former governor Bob Wise.I'll bet this is a big part of the problem. 38 is extremely young to be a university president. University presidents are usually ponderous figures who worked their way up through the department ranks in academia. Add to that the facts that the young president is also an attorney and a former political operative. Combine that with what the article paints as a micro-managing money-grabber of a coach and it sounds like a recipe for a massive clash of young hotshot egos.

pedro
01-29-2008, 11:25 PM
I'll bet this is a big part of the problem. 38 is extremely young to be a university president. University presidents usually work their way up through the department ranks in academia. Add to that the fact that the president is an attorney and a former political operative. Combine that with what the article paints as a micro-managing money-grabber of a coach and it sounds like a recipe for a massive clash of young hotshot egos.

I don't know if I get "money-grabber" out of that article. To me it read like Rodriguez was trying to wrestle control from outside influences he felt were detrimental to the program and to assure that the program got the resources he felt were adequate for long term success.

Unassisted
01-29-2008, 11:34 PM
I don't know if I get "money-grabber" out of that article. To me it read like Rodriguez was trying to wrestle control from outside influences he felt were detrimental to the program and to assure that the program got the resources he felt were adequate for long term success.

I read another article earlier today which talked about how Rodriguez wanted to set up his own web site but TPTB at WVU wouldn't let him do it. I pictured his web site as a revenue-generator, not unlike the controversial email newsletter that was the undoing of Franchione at A&M.

The other article I read talked about a similar row over controlling the revenue from offseason football camps.

Admittedly, this article glosses over those issues (or spins it differently) by saying "Rich Rodriguez wanted control over everything from sideline passes to football camps and his own Web site."

Considering the meddling this article says he was getting from the governor and the university president, I can understand why he'd want more control. But I don't have the impression that his demands were entirely altruistic.

pedro
01-30-2008, 12:05 AM
I read another article earlier today which talked about how Rodriguez wanted to set up his own web site but TPTB at WVU wouldn't let him do it. I pictured his web site as a revenue-generator, not unlike the controversial email newsletter that was the undoing of Franchione at A&M.

The other article I read talked about a similar row over controlling the revenue from offseason football camps.

Admittedly, this article glosses over those issues (or spins it differently) by saying "Rich Rodriguez wanted control over everything from sideline passes to football camps and his own Web site."

Considering the meddling this article says he was getting from the governor and the university president, I can understand why he'd want more control. But I don't have the impression that his demands were entirely altruistic.

most demands aren't.

that's pretty typical for almost every coach.

nevertheless, I haven't read anywhere where he was asking for more salary for himself.

Chip R
01-30-2008, 01:00 AM
I read another article earlier today which talked about how Rodriguez wanted to set up his own web site but TPTB at WVU wouldn't let him do it. I pictured his web site as a revenue-generator, not unlike the controversial email newsletter that was the undoing of Franchione at A&M.

The other article I read talked about a similar row over controlling the revenue from offseason football camps.

Admittedly, this article glosses over those issues (or spins it differently) by saying "Rich Rodriguez wanted control over everything from sideline passes to football camps and his own Web site."

Considering the meddling this article says he was getting from the governor and the university president, I can understand why he'd want more control. But I don't have the impression that his demands were entirely altruistic.


Good but very long article.

Havng a coach control more of the program may not necessarily be a bad thing. If a coach has good intentions, that control can keep the boosters away from the players and any shenanigans the boosters may do.

I do think Rodriguez should pay WVU all the $4M he owes them though. I can't blame him for not wanting to cause $4M is a lot of cash even for someone who makes as much as he does. But he signed the deal.

pedro
01-30-2008, 01:30 AM
I do think Rodriguez should pay WVU all the $4M he owes them though. I can't blame him for not wanting to cause $4M is a lot of cash even for someone who makes as much as he does. But he signed the deal.

That is the one part that is a little troubling to me. I'd love to know why he feels he shoudln't have to to pay it.

WVRedsFan
01-30-2008, 02:05 AM
That is the one part that is a little troubling to me. I'd love to know why he feels he shoudln't have to to pay it.

Pedro:

You have to know the situation. Rich signed the contract in August after it was submitted to him in December, 2006, right before their bowl game. The reason it was not signed earlier is that he had more demands to add which the athletic administration refused.

One such demand was selling the rights to a weekly show touting WVU football on a regional basis. His agent (who makes Goldman look like a saint) mentioned that was the only way that WVU could keep Rich's services--more revenue. He wanted complete control of the football program, and that's not a good thing when you consider NCAA regulations. In one for instance, many close to the situation claim he used football money to take a Myrtle Beach vacation. No one said anything about it beause he put it back, but then he accuses the University of borrowing from the fund for cash flow purposes. It's a nightmare.

I've known Rich for a long time. I have been in meeting with him and talked to him a lot over the last 10 years and he looks for the next great challenge more than anyone I've ever known. The loss to Pitt deeply hurt him and his immaturity caused him to look else where. The demands, minor in detail when you consider that he got all the salary demands he wanted for himself, were pretty much a smokescreen. He wanted out. He watched former basketball coach John Beilein lower his buyout last year by nearly $2 million and wanted to do the same (Beilein got out of it because Bobby Huggins was already on board to take the basketball job and his attorneys argued that WVU got a better coach).

Yes, the governor intervened, but that's West Virginia. Unfortunately, everyone knows everyone here. Our population is less than 2 million and even peons like me know the governor and the head football coach. It's just the way it is. The facts are that he walked away from a contract that he signed that had a $4 buyout and he stated on his own radio show that he would be here a long time and loved the state. United Bank, which based it advertising around Rich ran ads long into December proclaiming (and I quote from Rodriguez) that "I'm committed to West Virginia and so is my bank." He left a lot of people hanging here. Youc an get by with that in Ohio or most anywhere else, but here loyalty is your word and he went back on it. Adding insult to injury, he refused to live up to the contract, which around these parts is tantamount to treason. Yes, we need to get into the 21st Century.

Is Ed Pastilong the buffon that Rich and his agent make him out to be? No. Any man who has suprevised teams that have been to BCS bowls for the last two years and basketball teams that have been to the Elite 8, Sweet 16 and the NIT championship and kept the program in the black cannot be. Rich drew a line in the sand in his greed. And it backfired. The result is going to be a long legal battle that he will eventually lose. In the meantime, WVU and UM will have to take the brunt of the bad publicity.
Rich should pay the buyout. Then it will be over, but I don't think he has the money. It's something he should have thought about before he took the Michigan job (for only $300,00 moe per year).

WVRed
01-30-2008, 11:24 AM
Pedro:

You have to know the situation. Rich signed the contract in August after it was submitted to him in December, 2006, right before their bowl game. The reason it was not signed earlier is that he had more demands to add which the athletic administration refused.

One such demand was selling the rights to a weekly show touting WVU football on a regional basis. His agent (who makes Goldman look like a saint) mentioned that was the only way that WVU could keep Rich's services--more revenue. He wanted complete control of the football program, and that's not a good thing when you consider NCAA regulations. In one for instance, many close to the situation claim he used football money to take a Myrtle Beach vacation. No one said anything about it beause he put it back, but then he accuses the University of borrowing from the fund for cash flow purposes. It's a nightmare.

I've known Rich for a long time. I have been in meeting with him and talked to him a lot over the last 10 years and he looks for the next great challenge more than anyone I've ever known. The loss to Pitt deeply hurt him and his immaturity caused him to look else where. The demands, minor in detail when you consider that he got all the salary demands he wanted for himself, were pretty much a smokescreen. He wanted out. He watched former basketball coach John Beilein lower his buyout last year by nearly $2 million and wanted to do the same (Beilein got out of it because Bobby Huggins was already on board to take the basketball job and his attorneys argued that WVU got a better coach).

Yes, the governor intervened, but that's West Virginia. Unfortunately, everyone knows everyone here. Our population is less than 2 million and even peons like me know the governor and the head football coach. It's just the way it is. The facts are that he walked away from a contract that he signed that had a $4 buyout and he stated on his own radio show that he would be here a long time and loved the state. United Bank, which based it advertising around Rich ran ads long into December proclaiming (and I quote from Rodriguez) that "I'm committed to West Virginia and so is my bank." He left a lot of people hanging here. Youc an get by with that in Ohio or most anywhere else, but here loyalty is your word and he went back on it. Adding insult to injury, he refused to live up to the contract, which around these parts is tantamount to treason. Yes, we need to get into the 21st Century.

Is Ed Pastilong the buffon that Rich and his agent make him out to be? No. Any man who has suprevised teams that have been to BCS bowls for the last two years and basketball teams that have been to the Elite 8, Sweet 16 and the NIT championship and kept the program in the black cannot be. Rich drew a line in the sand in his greed. And it backfired. The result is going to be a long legal battle that he will eventually lose. In the meantime, WVU and UM will have to take the brunt of the bad publicity.
Rich should pay the buyout. Then it will be over, but I don't think he has the money. It's something he should have thought about before he took the Michigan job (for only $300,00 moe per year).

Well said.

I do think you put it best when you said that Rich Rodriguez wanted out last year. If there hadn't been the onslaught of pressure last year to keep from taking the Alabama job, Nick Saban may have been looking for work a year later than expected. Everything was done in secret just like the Michigan job but when it came out, everybody scurried like ants to get the money together to keep him. You can only do that so often.

As far as having money to pay the buyout, I don't think Rich will be too worried about that. I'd say the Michigan boosters will take care of it, but it will be done under the table. And even if he does have to pay, I think the installments are spread out.

flyer85
01-30-2008, 11:26 AM
WVU should take the $1.5M, call it a day and move on. There is no upside to continuing the fight.

Boston Red
01-30-2008, 11:30 AM
There is no upside to continuing the fight.

Well, except for the other $2.5 million.

pedro
01-30-2008, 11:31 AM
Thanks for the details WVredsfan.

I'm a Michigan fan and happy to have Rodriguez on board but unless there is something going on here I haven't heard about I think he should pay the buy out.

RedsBaron
01-30-2008, 11:32 AM
Rodriguez's lawyer was quoted as saying that WVU wanted "a pound of flesh." No--WVU wants the $4.0 million that Rodriguez owes under the terms of the contract.

Unassisted
01-30-2008, 11:59 AM
WVU should take the $1.5M, call it a day and move on. There is no upside to continuing the fight.It seems like the fans there are in favor of keeping that $4 million hook in Rodriguez's mouth, though. It's a politically popular position to take on behalf of a fanbase that feels like it was wronged.

I just wonder why Rodriguez didn't have his agent twist Michigan's arm and get them to include the buyout in his contract there, so they can fight this battle on his behalf. There's a lot of precedent for that sort of thing.

flyer85
01-31-2008, 10:15 AM
Well, except for the other $2.5 million.which is chump change for WVU and after all the lawyer fees it may come out a net loss. Continuing the fight will be distracting and make them look petty. The fans will get over it, at some point you have to move forward.

westofyou
01-31-2008, 10:21 AM
at some point you have to move forward.

Would that be before or after you TP and Egg his house?

Highlifeman21
01-31-2008, 10:32 AM
Would that be before or after you TP and Egg his house?

Supposedly TPing and Egging helps bring closure.

flyer85
01-31-2008, 11:07 AM
Would that be before or after you TP and Egg his house?in this case I would guess after. :D

This episode has really turned quite bizarre.

Boston Red
01-31-2008, 11:25 AM
which is chump change for WVU and after all the lawyer fees it may come out a net loss. Continuing the fight will be distracting and make them look petty. The fans will get over it, at some point you have to move forward.

What's the point of signing the contract with the $4 million buyout provision if you're not going to enforce it?!? And based on the article, the $4 million apparently isn't chump change to WV. What if WV signed a contract to pay HIM $4 million per year, and then the team went 6-6 and they decided, "Well, you weren't really that good this year, so we've decided to give you $1.5 million instead"? Something tells me Rich Rod would sue.

flyer85
01-31-2008, 11:52 AM
What's the point of signing the contract with the $4 million buyout provision if you're not going to enforce it?!? And based on the article, the $4 million apparently isn't chump change to WV. What if WV signed a contract to pay HIM $4 million per year, and then the team went 6-6 and they decided, "Well, you weren't really that good this year, so we've decided to give you $1.5 million instead"? Something tells me Rich Rod would sue.The basketball coach paid a lot less than his full buyout, and there seems to be a lot that went on behind the scenes. I seriously doubt WVU wants to air their dirty laundry by going to court.

Chip R
01-31-2008, 12:10 PM
What's the point of signing the contract with the $4 million buyout provision if you're not going to enforce it?!? And based on the article, the $4 million apparently isn't chump change to WV. What if WV signed a contract to pay HIM $4 million per year, and then the team went 6-6 and they decided, "Well, you weren't really that good this year, so we've decided to give you $1.5 million instead"? Something tells me Rich Rod would sue.


I agree. He signed a new deal as recent as last year. So he had inclinations of leaving then. He came back and signed a new deal. I'm sure that $4M buyout caught his eye - or at the very least his agent's eye. I would think he could have negotiated a lower figure for a buyout. He may have thought he could have settled on a lower figure if he decided to leave but it appears he was wrong. I'm sure there is a lot of bitterness and spite involved in this but $2.5M is not an insignificant amount. Rodriguez either needs to pay WVU or have Michigan do it. Both sides need to put this behind them.

WMR
01-31-2008, 12:29 PM
which is chump change for WVU and after all the lawyer fees it may come out a net loss. Continuing the fight will be distracting and make them look petty. The fans will get over it, at some point you have to move forward.

People sign contracts for a reason.

RFS62
01-31-2008, 12:33 PM
I think Judge Judy needs to get involved.

WMR
01-31-2008, 12:35 PM
I think Judge Judy needs to get involved.

Yes. All parties involved in this situation could use a good yelling at.

WVRed
01-31-2008, 12:48 PM
The basketball coach paid a lot less than his full buyout, and there seems to be a lot that went on behind the scenes. I seriously doubt WVU wants to air their dirty laundry by going to court.

WVU had Huggins coming in, so they didn't really fight as hard.

Chip R
01-31-2008, 01:12 PM
WVU had Huggins coming in, so they didn't really fight as hard.


That's probably true. I'm guessing that basketball doesn't have quite the following football does there - especially considering the recent success of the football team. Rodriguez shouldn't have assumed that just because Behlein didn't have to pay all of his buyout that he wouldn't either. It reminds me of the Pete Rose situation where he agreed to a lifetime ban cause he assumed he'd be let back in the game after a year or two because he's Pete Rose. Now if WVU and Rodriguez want to settle, that's another story. But if WVU is going to hold Rodriguez to his end, I think he better pay up. I can't blame him for not wanting to since $4M is a serious chunk of change but he signed the deal.

Roy Tucker
01-31-2008, 01:17 PM
Rodriguez's story...

http://dailymail.com/Sports/WVUSports/200801250155

pedro
01-31-2008, 01:22 PM
Rodriguez's story...

http://dailymail.com/Sports/WVUSports/200801250155

Signing contracts based on supposed verbal agreements to modify said contract at a later date is a spectacularly bad idea.

Boston Red
01-31-2008, 01:27 PM
Weak response. It's been 8 years since I took Contracts in law school, but the parol evidence rule sure seems to ring a bell on a lot of Rich's claims. Obviously anything that happened post-signing is different, but those issues seem much smaller. When the four corners of a contract say it's a $4 million buyout, you're not generally going to get much of a reception in court arguing "Yeah, but they told me that it really only MEANT $2 million."

Unassisted
01-31-2008, 02:01 PM
Signing contracts based on supposed verbal agreements to modify said contract at a later date is a spectacularly bad idea.Sounds like Rich was unfamiliar with that old saw about verbal agreements being as valid as the paper they are written on. He'd better get his checkbook ready.

RFS62
01-31-2008, 05:29 PM
I can't believe Michigan is letting this go on.

pedro
01-31-2008, 05:31 PM
I can't believe Michigan is letting this go on.

me neither.

it really makes me wonder whether Rodriguez is in their long term plans or whether he's just a stop gap to them.

WVRed
01-31-2008, 07:52 PM
me neither.

it really makes me wonder whether Rodriguez is in their long term plans or whether he's just a stop gap to them.

How do you figure?

pedro
01-31-2008, 07:57 PM
How do you figure?

It just seems odd to me that Michigan or some of its' boosters haven't stepped forward to pay the buy out. Typically the team poaching a coach does so IIRC.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-31-2008, 08:21 PM
I think Miles will be coaching there within 5 years.

Without December 1st, none of this would be happening right now.

WVRed
01-31-2008, 08:23 PM
I think Miles will be coaching there within 5 years.

Without December 1st, none of this would be happening right now.

Thank Kirk Herbstreit for making news rather than reporting it.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-31-2008, 10:25 PM
I'm thinking more along the lines of the Pittsburgh upset of WV.

If WV doesn't get upset, they play OSU in the NC game and Miles is a sure thing to UM.

WVRed
01-31-2008, 10:47 PM
It just seems odd to me that Michigan or some of its' boosters haven't stepped forward to pay the buy out. Typically the team poaching a coach does so IIRC.

I think it will be done under the table(if it hasn't already). Just nothing will be leaked in the press about it.

FWIW, assuming I am wrong on the above, they didn't pay Beilein's buyout either.

Unassisted
07-09-2008, 10:28 AM
Looks like he'll be paying the $4 million.

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/sports/stories/2008/07/09/payrod.html?sid=101

westofyou
07-09-2008, 10:37 AM
Looks like he'll be paying the $4 million.

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/sports/stories/2008/07/09/payrod.html?sid=101

4 million buys a lot of toilet paper rolls.

WVRedsFan
07-09-2008, 05:47 PM
4 million buys a lot of toilet paper rolls.

Apparently Michigan had had enough of this mess.

No matter. Thank God it's over.

WVRed
07-09-2008, 08:38 PM
4 million buys a lot of toilet paper rolls.

And a lot of couches.

I just wish Michigan would have just payed Rodriguez out of his contract. Say what you want, but I have a feeling that if Rodriguez restores Michigan to prominence, everybody in West Virginia will idolize him the same way they do Bobby Bowden. Time heals all wounds.

WVRedsFan
07-09-2008, 09:06 PM
And a lot of couches.

I just wish Michigan would have just payed Rodriguez out of his contract. Say what you want, but I have a feeling that if Rodriguez restores Michigan to prominence, everybody in West Virginia will idolize him the same way they do Bobby Bowden. Time heals all wounds.

Nah. The wounds are too deep for most folks. I couldn't care less, but some folks here still hate Bobby Bowden and they despise Frank Cignetti. And that was over 30 years ago.

WVRedsFan
07-09-2008, 11:24 PM
This article from the Detroit Free Press.

http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080709/SPORTS06/80709105

WVPacman
07-09-2008, 11:57 PM
And a lot of couches.

I just wish Michigan would have just payed Rodriguez out of his contract. Say what you want, but I have a feeling that if Rodriguez restores Michigan to prominence, everybody in West Virginia will idolize him the same way they do Bobby Bowden. Time heals all wounds.


:laugh: There is no way in the world that all the WVU fans will like him again after all the crap he has pulled with us.I don't hate nobody but I strongly dislike the guy and my feelings will never change.He is the biggest scumbag iin football and that will never change. The whole state of West Virginia is exstatic that this whole thing is over with and we are glad that the scumbag is out of our lives FOREVER.Thank you Michigan,you wanted him and now you got him so he is your problem now.:beerme:

WVRed
07-10-2008, 10:15 AM
:laugh: There is no way in the world that all the WVU fans will like him again after all the crap he has pulled with us.I don't hate nobody but I strongly dislike the guy and my feelings will never change.He is the biggest scumbag iin football and that will never change. The whole state of West Virginia is exstatic that this whole thing is over with and we are glad that the scumbag is out of our lives FOREVER.Thank you Michigan,you wanted him and now you got him so he is your problem now.:beerme:

Talk to me in ten years. Most of the people in the state wanted Terry Bowden to take the job because his dad was the coach here once upon a time. Granted, the Bobby Bowden divorce was nothing like Rodriguez and was semi-expected, but Rodriguez is a native West Virginia, and once he wins a national title at Michigan, people will forget everything that happened.

I am not a WVU fan(originally from Kentucky), but it does give me a chance to sit back and watch how fickle some of the fans are here in the state. You have some who claim that Rodriguez threw the Pitt game because he knew ahead of time he was taking the Michigan job and didn't care.

I made the comment to people here at work, school, church, wherever the week of the Pitt game not to overlook Pitt. Fans were already booking hotel rooms to New Orleans for the championship game. One person even made the comment that "Coach Rodriguez would never let the players overlook Pitt". Needless to say, almost 48 hours later, I felt like a prophet.

I really believe though that Ken Kendrick should stay out of all matters involving WVU however. He was the one who insisted on the 4 million buyout clause and thoroughly criticized the hiring of Bill Stewart. Unfortunately he is a major booster for the program, but he is really taking opportunities to throw the university under the bus.

WVRedsFan
07-10-2008, 10:46 AM
What you say is true. Of course, most of the people who hung Bobby in effigy are long gone from the scene. That was 32 years ago.

Cockiness goes right along with fandom for some reason, and I've never liked that aspect of famdom. WVU had a nice year, and that's all that matters.

As for Rodriguez, I'm glad that's over. It would be nice to concentrate on baseball in the summer. I quit following pro football long ago and I'm just about through with college, too. Like XM Radio, I'm pretty much into baseball 24/7 these days.

BuckeyeRedleg
01-11-2011, 12:29 AM
I think Miles will be coaching there within 5 years.

Without December 1st, none of this would be happening right now.

Somewhere else I predicted RR would only last for 3 years (specifically), but it looks like I'll be right on here.