PDA

View Full Version : How Many Redszoners are prison inmates?



cincinnati chili
02-16-2008, 09:45 PM
It is my understanding that a minority of American prison systems and some international prison systems give their inmates internet access.

That got me wondering, will any of you admit to currently being incarcerated?

Are there any 'zoners who you expect are incarcerated?

I can think of a few who should be. ;)

RedFanAlways1966
02-16-2008, 09:47 PM
I was married September 27, 2003. Does that count?!? ;)

SunDeck
02-16-2008, 09:55 PM
Don't know about that, but one of the weirdest things about working in a public library is helping people locate relatives via state inmate locators. Just about every state has one on the internet; I probably help about half a dozen people look someone up each week.

These people's lives are so different than mine.

WMR
02-17-2008, 03:26 AM
I am. Luckily I've been able to keep my Blackberry hidden, Shawshank Redemption style.

24/7 prison posting, baby!!!

Ravenlord
02-17-2008, 03:38 AM
if/when i'm incarcerated, this will still be my first stop on the net.

GAC
02-17-2008, 04:17 AM
I was married September 27, 2003. Does that count?!? ;)

rookie!

almost 26 years here and still waiting for parole!

[and to all you ladies out there - I'M JOKING!] :p:



But I once spent a night in Kalamazoo. Does that count?

Highlifeman21
02-17-2008, 08:43 AM
I spent 3 years at tOSU, does that count?

WMR
02-17-2008, 08:47 AM
I spent 3 years at tOSU, does that count?

:eek:

OldRightHander
02-17-2008, 02:31 PM
I spent 3 years at tOSU, does that count?

I passed through Ann Arbor last night. Does that qualify?

reds44
02-17-2008, 02:32 PM
I am. Luckily I've been able to keep my Blackberry hidden, Shawshank Redemption style.

24/7 prison posting, baby!!!
Where did you hide it?

Nevermind, I don't want to know.

:eek:

Highlifeman21
02-17-2008, 02:34 PM
I passed through Ann Arbor last night. Does that qualify?

Yours counts if mine counts.

Deal?

WMR
02-17-2008, 02:41 PM
Where did you hide it?

Nevermind, I don't want to know.

:eek:

It's stashed behind my Adam Dunn poster. :cool:

pedro
02-17-2008, 02:41 PM
Not enough?

WMR
02-17-2008, 02:41 PM
Not enough?

hahaahahahahahahahah

PEDRO!!!!!!

:lol:

TeamBoone
02-17-2008, 07:31 PM
I know this off topic, but it's a pet peeve... I hate that inmates have Internet access. Personally, I don't think they should. Read a book instead.

Raisor
02-17-2008, 07:34 PM
I'm guessing Puffy has spent plenty of time in the gray-bar motel.

sonny
02-17-2008, 08:16 PM
I'd bet RFS had spent some time in the joint. Casting lots for cigarettes and what not.:)

Chip R
02-17-2008, 08:27 PM
I'd bet RFS had spent some time in the joint. Casting lots for cigarettes and what not.:)


Yeah. I heard his cell mate was Capone.

sonny
02-17-2008, 08:31 PM
Yeah. I heard his cell mate was Capone.

Yep, Billy Capone, Al's dad.

cincinnati chili
02-17-2008, 10:10 PM
Yeah. I heard his cell mate was Capone.

Or was it Jean Valjean?

Spitball
02-18-2008, 09:12 AM
I know this off topic, but it's a pet peeve... I hate that inmates have Internet access. Personally, I don't think they should. Read a book instead.

Unless they are working on a degree, I'm not sure many really have unlimited internet access. I have a friend who used to tutor inmates, and they were not even allowed to use real pencils.

cincinnati chili
02-18-2008, 02:31 PM
Unless they are working on a degree, I'm not sure many really have unlimited internet access. I have a friend who used to tutor inmates, and they were not even allowed to use real pencils.


It's highly unusual in the U.S. but it does occur. http://www.topix.com/forum/city/schuylkill-haven-pa/TUV4916SDIKLB85NM

RFS62
02-18-2008, 05:45 PM
Or was it Jean Valjean?


Bread stealin' young punk he was.

SunDeck
02-18-2008, 06:20 PM
I know this off topic, but it's a pet peeve... I hate that inmates have Internet access. Personally, I don't think they should. Read a book instead.

So they can look up information on breaking out of prison.

And porn, of course. But surely their internet must be filtered, which we all know works. Right?

vaticanplum
02-18-2008, 07:24 PM
I know this off topic, but it's a pet peeve... I hate that inmates have Internet access. Personally, I don't think they should. Read a book instead.

Books are extremely hard to come by in prisons. There is almost no budget for them, so jails rely on donations (Books Behind Bars is one of the biggest organizations). But, unsurprisingly, prisons are not the first charity people think of when they want to give old books away, nor the most appealing for many.

Books are also more difficult to control in prison, especially high-security facilities. There are places to hide dangerous things in books and there is not staff to review every bit of all reading material that comes in, whereas internet usage can be regulated and moderated. You may not like them having access, but in some cases it's actually a safety precaution.

Hollcat
02-18-2008, 09:14 PM
I'm in the joint 8 hours a day. The THUGS (Temporarily Housed Under Gov't Supervision) who reside there do not have any internet access.

Krusty
10-29-2008, 02:33 AM
I work at a federal institution and if inmates have internet access it isn't at the federal level.

TRF
10-29-2008, 09:25 AM
I work at a federal institution and if inmates have internet access it isn't at the federal level.

Does being on a chain gang count as working at a federal institution?

OldRightHander
10-29-2008, 11:22 AM
I'd bet RFS had spent some time in the joint.

It was Andersonville. Hard time there.

BoydsOfSummer
10-29-2008, 04:04 PM
It was Andersonville. Hard time there.
:roll::lol:

Dom Heffner
10-29-2008, 04:19 PM
Oh boy, I better get thrown in jail so I can get free internet access. :)

RBA
10-30-2008, 08:13 PM
Oh boy, I better get thrown in jail so I can get free internet access. :)

Be careful, it's not unlimited. You may have to barter your wares with other inmates to check redszone.com.

Razor Shines
10-31-2008, 07:15 AM
I work for a small business owner in the construction industry and he's willing to pretty much give anyone who asks for a job a chance. So we've had several guys come and go who've been in prison. Currently we have one and yesterday I asked him about this. He was in federal prison at Pendleton in Indiana. He said he had never heard of anyone getting internet access. And as far as books go, he said he (and a lot of other inmates) had a TV in his cell so he didn't care too much about trying to get a book and doesn't know how scarce they were.

919191
10-31-2008, 09:18 AM
I ran into a guy I used to work in a state prison in Indiana as a guard. He said there is internet access there, but it is for the employees and guards, not the inmates.

TeamSelig
10-31-2008, 12:48 PM
the Wabash Valley max has internet access but it is for legal research on their cases.... they acted like this was a law to allow them to research their appeals, etc. It had a small library too. The only people eligible for these things were those who had extended good behavior.

As for TVs, I think most are allowed to have them (if they aren't in the bad behavior section), but you have to buy them from the prison itself (jacked up prices).

WV also had an education program for college credits that they could use the internet for. It wasn't free, however. Pretty sure their computers were heavily monitored and blocked basically everything but the legal research program.

Mario-Rijo
11-08-2008, 04:59 PM
I just got out in April, did 5 years in a local jail....as a Corrections Officer. :D We had some very, very limited internet access for inmates. It was filtered down to just a couple of particular sites, just for the purposes of learning basic skills for future purposes on the outside. Was attended bye only 4-5 inmates up to twice a week (one 1 hour class 1-2 wkly) and was closely monitored by an instructor. Obviously no known troublemakers were ever really granted permission to attend. They did have pencils but they were just long enough to use (about 2 inches long) with no erasers. Their toothbrushes were about as long as their pencils also, (nobody likes a shank). But they would roll up paper really tight (in the shape of a straw basically), harden it with toothpaste, deodorant and the like and insert their pencils to make them longer.

We also had quite a few books we distributed to inmates once a week. It was a 3 book a week max, rotation deal. I took in a dozen or so books a few times to add to the selection, it aggravated even me to see that selection at times. Yeah they are inmates but when you work with them everyday you learn to not bend over backwards for them but be reasonable. And too me it was reasonable to give them something to do other than them have nothing but time to plot something "else" to do.

We also had TV's but in our Pods (small dorms) we had only 1 per about 20-25 inmates maximum. We also had a Male Dormitory that had 60 men and 3 TV's. The same with the female inmates sans the large dorm. Our maximum security was single cells but only one TV that they would get out of their cells to watch. 1 guy at a time for 1 hour a day, the rest of the day they could watch it if they stood at their doors looking out of their 12x 4 windows.

I'll tell ya what it was a very interesting 5 years of my life. I'm glad I worked it as I gained a better appreciation for all involved but that said I hurt my back and that career is over. But I wouldn't wanna do it again anyways, it can be extremely stressful.

Handofdeath
11-08-2008, 06:28 PM
Don't know about that, but one of the weirdest things about working in a public library is helping people locate relatives via state inmate locators. Just about every state has one on the internet; I probably help about half a dozen people look someone up each week.

These people's lives are so different than mine.

I work in a public library too and we get letters from inmates wanting all kinds of crap like addresses of strip clubs. And no, I haven't ever been to prison. Although, I was just released recently from a 28 day stay at a "medical facility.";)

OldRightHander
11-10-2008, 12:45 PM
Does being stuck in Texas without a load count?

TRF
11-10-2008, 02:06 PM
Does being stuck in Texas without a load count?

Actually, yes.

SunDeck
11-10-2008, 03:53 PM
I work in a public library too and we get letters from inmates wanting all kinds of crap like addresses of strip clubs.

Maybe since they don't have internet access, they write to ask for autographed pics?

BoydsOfSummer
11-10-2008, 06:02 PM
This thread needs a poll!

I wonder how many Zonies have spent any time at all in the gray bar hotel; even if it was just overnight.

Hollcat
11-10-2008, 08:58 PM
Krusty where do you work at? I work at McCreary is south Kentucky.

OldRightHander
11-10-2008, 09:29 PM
This thread needs a poll!

I wonder how many Zonies have spent any time at all in the gray bar hotel; even if it was just overnight.

I posted my story a couple years back. I don't know if it's still on here somewhere or not.

klw
11-13-2008, 10:10 PM
I have had clients in a number of jails and prisons in a number of states. None have ever said they internet access. Most have limited and espensive phone options. They can buy tv's but other than jobs paying 15 dollars a month they are dependant on money sent from home to buy the tv or toliteries.

Falls City Beer
11-14-2008, 02:34 PM
In the jails and prisons I've been in (as a visitor; I work with inmates upon their release) it's mostly crappy TVs (one per cell bloc--in common rooms), board games (primarily chess) and junky popular paperback fiction. And that's about it.

RedlegJake
11-16-2008, 11:52 AM
My youngest son is in prison right now. Drugs. Its a drag visiting but I do it every Sunday, line up to get searched, take my baggie full of quarters so I can buy him a Coke and a couple candy bars while we visit (at a buck each!). I don't know about anywhere else but Missouri doesn't allow internet access. He can buy a phone card from the commissory to call home after years of complaints that collect calls to families were outrageous and a burden to families who hadn't broken any laws. (Before he got some money on his books he called us collect and the bills for twenty minutes once a week were right at fifty bucks a month). It's crazy because one major factor in preventing rescidivism is family contact yet they make it prohibitively expensive. I put twenty bucks in his account monthly just for the phone card, which lets him call us the same amount for quite a bit less.

Now I have a dilemma concerning Rich, my son. He wants to live with us when he gets out this coming January and needs a home plan. I really hate to admit this but he's been untrustworthy, a liar, and quite a con man - he can look you in the eye and tell you he's doing this and that to straighten out his life but then turn around and do whatever the hell he wants in the next second. His brothers and I are glad he went to prison actually as we feel it has saved his life at least for now. What he does when he gets out will determine whether he lives or dies, imo. If he goes back to the drugs, he's doomed. He's stolen from me many times, and I've thrown him out more than once before he went to prison for lying, stealing and laying around doing nothing. I mean it - no one can know the heartbreak this causes a parent and the anger. Why is it so damn hard for him to figure out? His brothers and sisters have all become grown, responsible people I'm proud of - he was raised in the same home, same rules, same everything. Now I am remarried with a 5 year old step daughter and have to make a very difficult decision. He has an alternative - a halfway house. I think the rules and strictures he'd have to follow would be good for him but he desperately wants to live here instead. My wife says she'll support me whatever I decide (and she means it - she is a gem, how I got so lucky twice in my life I'll never know) but I have to think of Saide, my 5 year old s/d. I don;t want Rich here if it means he goes back to his old ways, and I wonder if I can set rules that he'll feel compelled to follow. My heart goes out to him but I wonder if the right thing is to let him live in the halfway house and "prove out" on his own. That's the course my head says is the 'tough love' one, my heart cries otherwise. He's 22 now, it's past time to grow up obviously. So why do I feel I'm abandoning him if I say no?

I've decided to post this as it's own post and maybe get more replies. I've discussed Reds with all of you many, many times and really would like to hear your advice. FCB has been a teacher, and I know some of you have been attorneys, or corrections officers, etc. and most of you are parents who can understand, maybe, the angst and concerns. What do you think ? Rich is a non-violent drug abuser, head in rock music and dreamy clouds of unreality about becoming a rock star, funny and engaging to talk to (like I said quite the con man) and has many, many friends (many of em the wrong kind but a lot surprisingly level headed good people). At this point he's still more confused kid than hard criminal but I do mean it - I know if he returns to his former lifestyle he is likely a hardened criminal before long. Noithing has ever confused me and made me so indecisive before in my entire life.