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GAC
02-17-2008, 07:50 PM
Other then a house payment or rent.

In a family of five, my biggest "peeve", and something I've been harping on the wife and kids about, is our weekly grocery/food budget. I think it is simply ridiculous! Between grocery and those 2-3 times during the week when we get some sort of fast food, we can spend close to $350-$400/week on food. I just think that is really excessive.

I work 3rd shift, and my wife works 2nd. And with three teenagers we really don't have "sit down" suppers in the evenings. My wife will, at times, make stuff up in advance, like spaghetti; but for the most part, when we go to the grocery it's buying stuff/meals for each individual. My two boys would eat pizza or some other type of pasta 24/7.

sonny
02-17-2008, 08:36 PM
Back when My wife and I first got married, we both smoked about a pack a day, at about $3 a pack x 7 days a week= $42 a week on smokes! Thats $2,184 a year on killing ourselves!

Thank God she quit. :)

GAC
02-17-2008, 09:24 PM
Back when My wife and I first got married, we both smoked about a pack a day, at about $3 a pack x 7 days a week= $42 a week on smokes! Thats $2,184 a year on killing ourselves!

Thank God she quit. :)

:lol:

Since we built our new home last year, smoking is banned at home. And I've adapted, and it really hasn't bothered me at all. I work 3rd shift so I sleep during the day. Late afternoon/early evening, when I get up, I refrain for the most part; but will walk out on the deck with a cup of coffee right before I leave for work and grab a smoke.

But the self-inflicted ban has helped me drastically cut down on my smoking. I can smoke at work during breaks/lunch; but with the new smoking ban law in Ohio you have to go outside in a designated smoking area. But the freezing cold dissuades a lot.

OldRightHander
02-17-2008, 09:50 PM
The biggest expenditure for us would have to be fuel. It's nothing for me to drop $2000 a month on diesel. Other than that, food can be a big cost at times because it's harder to eat cheap on the road unless I take a bunch of home cooked food with me when I leave. With both of us being self employed, me having a still small trucking company and my wife running a cleaning business, a lot of our expenses are at least tax deductible.

Redsfaithful
02-18-2008, 07:14 AM
Other then a house payment or rent.

In a family of five, my biggest "peeve", and something I've been harping on the wife and kids about, is our weekly grocery/food budget. I think it is simply ridiculous! Between grocery and those 2-3 times during the week when we get some sort of fast food, we can spend close to $350-$400/week on food. I just think that is really excessive.

I work 3rd shift, and my wife works 2nd. And with three teenagers we really don't have "sit down" suppers in the evenings. My wife will, at times, make stuff up in advance, like spaghetti; but for the most part, when we go to the grocery it's buying stuff/meals for each individual. My two boys would eat pizza or some other type of pasta 24/7.

GAC, this really helped my wife and I out with the food budget:

http://www.thegrocerygame.com/

It's only added like 15 min a week to the food planning/shopping, and they do charge a small fee, but we have found it to be pretty worthwhile, especially since food is usually our biggest expenditure too.

HotCorner
02-18-2008, 07:49 AM
GAC, this really helped my wife and I out with the food budget:

http://www.thegrocerygame.com/

It's only added like 15 min a week to the food planning/shopping, and they do charge a small fee, but we have found it to be pretty worthwhile, especially since food is usually our biggest expenditure too.

How much has this service helped you save on an average trip to the grocery store?

MaineRed
02-18-2008, 08:39 AM
The biggest expenditure for us would have to be fuel. It's nothing for me to drop $2000 a month on diesel.

That isn't a household expenditure.

Food is up there for us, an average of about $200 per week.

About a month ago we decided to go to Sams club and load up on the stuff they have that we use to see if we could save some money and we spent about $300.

With the trip to Sams we have spent less than $100 the last four weeks at the grocery store, so we appear to be saving some money. Plus we still have a boatload of the stuff we bought there.

Buying in bulk, even at the grocery store can save money. Don't buy one roll of paper towels, buy 8. Check the unit prices. The more you buy, usually the more you save.

SunDeck
02-18-2008, 09:33 AM
I don't think we spend quite $200 a week on groceries. The thing that helps, and we are lucky here I suppose, is that we don't buy a lot of pre-processed foods. I say we are lucky because my wife only works part time is around the house to prepare our dinners. And she is pretty strict about foods- very little sugar and sodium, which is hard to accomplish when you cook out of envelopes, boxes and soup cans. So she buys staples, fruits, vegetables and very few snacks, which I am guessing keeps our bills a little lower.

My new year's resolution was to eat out for lunch less than one time per week. My guess is that this will save me somewhere in the neighborhood of $200 this year. It's not a huge amount, but it all adds up.

Dom Heffner
02-18-2008, 11:03 AM
Since I've been obsessing on getting my grass green, it's the water bill.

Before that it was definitely the cable/internet service we have, which is definitely worth it.

minus5
02-18-2008, 11:43 AM
Daycare......:bang:

pedro
02-18-2008, 12:12 PM
property taxes, food, health insurance, internet/phone/cable, natural gas, gummy bears.



just kidding about the gummy bears.

they're really gummy worms.

GoReds33
02-18-2008, 12:12 PM
Tickets to sporting events. We usually go to about 20 Reds games, 1-2 Bengals games, and maybe 10 Bearcats games. It adds up quickly.

pedro
02-18-2008, 12:15 PM
Since I've been obsessing on getting my grass green, it's the water bill.

Before that it was definitely the cable/internet service we have, which is definitely worth it.

I haven't watered my front yard in 5 years (no grass). By now, if it isn't "native", or at least able to adapt, it's gone. I do water my backyard a few of times a week in the summer, although that's more for my raspberries and strawberries than it is for the grass.

Dom Heffner
02-18-2008, 12:40 PM
I haven't watered my front yard in 5 years (no grass). By now, if it isn't "native", or at least able to adapt, it's gone. I do water my backyard a few of times a week in the summer, although that's more for my raspberries and strawberries than it is for the grass.


I tried to do the no water thing, but I started getting attacked by every lawn care business in town. Just awful.

I went from having the worst lawn in the neighborhood to the best.

pedro
02-18-2008, 12:43 PM
I tried to do the no water thing, but I started getting attacked by every lawn care business in town. Just awful.

I went from having the worst lawn in the neighborhood to the best.

probably easier for me, my front yard is terraced and is really nothing but trees, bushes and flower beds.

westofyou
02-18-2008, 01:05 PM
I tried to do the no water thing, but I started getting attacked by every lawn care business in town. Just awful.

I went from having the worst lawn in the neighborhood to the best.

My lawn has a heavy moss undertone, green in the winter, dry in the summer, it's a pain to cultivate a classic monoculture in a rain forest, so I try not to pander to it other then cutting it.

As for biggest household expenditure?

Property taxes and wired living (4 phone lines, 3 web sites, Directv baseball/hockey package, 2 IP's, multiple computers)

oneupper
02-18-2008, 01:25 PM
Homeowners Insurance, Property Taxes (its murder in FL).
Health Insurance (self-employed).

After that...it gets more manageable.

We travel a lot...but the kennel cost for the dog is that one thing you don't count on.

BoydsOfSummer
02-18-2008, 01:54 PM
Beer.

HotCorner
02-18-2008, 02:37 PM
Daycare......:bang:

Amen brother!

SunDeck
02-18-2008, 02:50 PM
This morning, I was thinking about the differences in spending between today and when I was a kid. Overall, I'm pretty sure the tax burden and the money spent on housing is probably higher as a percentage of take home pay today. But what about spending on things that didn't even exist back then?

When I was a kid-
My parents got their television signal for free.
You listened to AM radio for the most part. No XM.
Watching a Reds game didn't cost a dime- ie, you didn't need cable or a subscription.
There were no cell phones.
There was no internet. Heck, there were no computers, no video games, no dvds, no ipods.

Strikes Out Looking
02-18-2008, 02:51 PM
Things my wife thinks we need, but that I think we can do without!

pedro
02-18-2008, 04:26 PM
This morning, I was thinking about the differences in spending between today and when I was a kid. Overall, I'm pretty sure the tax burden and the money spent on housing is probably higher as a percentage of take home pay today. But what about spending on things that didn't even exist back then?

When I was a kid-
My parents got their television signal for free.
You listened to AM radio for the most part. No XM.
Watching a Reds game didn't cost a dime- ie, you didn't need cable or a subscription.
There were no cell phones.
There was no internet. Heck, there were no computers, no video games, no dvds, no ipods.


I was reading "Tourist Season" by Carl Hiaasen which was written in 1986 and there was a mention by one of the characters about how they had gotten a really good interest rate on a house. The really good interest rate was 9.5. This really makes me wonder about the lifetime cost of ownership of a house and how even though home prices have gone up dramatically the difference isn't as big as it seems b/c of lower interest rates.

Roy Tucker
02-18-2008, 04:26 PM
Food and groceries.

We've gone to eating better and organic, so things cost a little more. Plus my son is back home.

As a friend of mine said, we shop from around the outside of the grocery store, not the middle.

I think my wine bill has gone up too. My tastes are getting a little more expensive.

Roy Tucker
02-18-2008, 04:27 PM
I was reading "Tourist Season" by Carl Hiaasen which was written in 1986 and there was a mention by one of the characters about how they had gotten a really good interest rate on a house. The really good interest rate was 9.5. This really makes me wonder about the lifetime cost of ownership of a house and how even though home prices have gone up dramatically the difference isn't as big as it seems b/c of lower interest rates.

When I first bought a house in 1984, I spent some money to buy the interest rate *down* to 16%. I think rates were about 18.5% then.

OldRightHander
02-18-2008, 04:29 PM
We've gone to eating better and organic, so things cost a little more.


I have tried to find the non organic food at the store, but I have yet to see any.

pedro
02-18-2008, 04:32 PM
When I first bought a house in 1984, I spent some money to buy the interest rate *down* to 16%. I think rates were about 18.5% then.

holy shnikies.

bucksfan2
02-18-2008, 04:47 PM
When I first bought a house in 1984, I spent some money to buy the interest rate *down* to 16%. I think rates were about 18.5% then.

I wonder if the rate and price of the house back then correlate to the same house's price and rate today?

pedro
02-18-2008, 05:25 PM
I wonder if the rate and price of the house back then correlate to the same house's price and rate today?

You can borrow 200,000 for 30 years at 5.75 % for $1167.00/ month

100,000 at 14% for 30 years is $1184.00 / month.

Roy Tucker
02-18-2008, 06:45 PM
I have tried to find the non organic food at the store, but I have yet to see any.

???

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_food

MaineRed
02-18-2008, 07:41 PM
He is joking Roy. With all the things that are labeled "organic" nobody will admit to producing stuff that isn't organic and label it accordingly.

GAC
02-18-2008, 08:15 PM
When I first bought a house in 1984, I spent some money to buy the interest rate *down* to 16%. I think rates were about 18.5% then.

I remember those days. Especially when you could refinance and get it down to 11%. You thought that was a steal!

GAC
02-18-2008, 08:18 PM
This morning, I was thinking about the differences in spending between today and when I was a kid. Overall, I'm pretty sure the tax burden and the money spent on housing is probably higher as a percentage of take home pay today. But what about spending on things that didn't even exist back then?

When I was a kid-
My parents got their television signal for free.
You listened to AM radio for the most part. No XM.
Watching a Reds game didn't cost a dime- ie, you didn't need cable or a subscription.
There were no cell phones.
There was no internet. Heck, there were no computers, no video games, no dvds, no ipods.

If they can find a way to charge you for it, they will.

Look at the bottled water industry.

Roy Tucker
02-18-2008, 09:18 PM
He is joking Roy. With all the things that are labeled "organic" nobody will admit to producing stuff that isn't organic and label it accordingly.


"USDA Organic" is a USDA certified thing. Now, their standards may not seem all hippie and granola, but its not something food producers can just slap on their product.

http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop/indexNet.htm

Now, when food manufacturers label their products "natural", that's when I laugh. There is no "natural" standard.

OldRightHander
02-18-2008, 09:30 PM
"USDA Organic" is a USDA certified thing. Now, their standards may not seem all hippie and granola, but its not something food producers can just slap on their product.

http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop/indexNet.htm

Now, when food manufacturers label their products "natural", that's when I laugh. There is no "natural" standard.

I was picking on the use of the word "organic". I might have forgotten most of my high school science, but I seem to remember that living things are organic, and darn near everything we eat had at one time been a living thing. Does it ever occur to folks that ALL fruit and vegetables are organic?

vaticanplum
02-18-2008, 09:40 PM
I was picking on the use of the word "organic". I might have forgotten most of my high school science, but I seem to remember that living things are organic, and darn near everything we eat had at one time been a living thing. Does it ever occur to folks that ALL fruit and vegetables are organic?

The "organic" refers to how they're grown, not what they are. It's a shortened version of the phrase "organic farming". Organic means grown without pesticides or fertilizers. Thus, not all fruits and vegetables are grown organically.

919191
02-18-2008, 10:03 PM
The "organic" refers to how they're grown, not what they are. It's a shortened version of the phrase "organic farming". Organic means grown without pesticides or fertilizers. Thus, not all fruits and vegetables are grown organically.

They even have to be grown so much distance away from other land that isn't organic.

OldRightHander
02-19-2008, 08:18 AM
The "organic" refers to how they're grown, not what they are. It's a shortened version of the phrase "organic farming". Organic means grown without pesticides or fertilizers. Thus, not all fruits and vegetables are grown organically.

I know all that, but I just can't help picking on language sometimes. I can be a bit of a smart :mooner: at times. The other day I saw some grapes in a grocery and I asked why they were so expensive and the young girl told me that they were organic. I asked her where the plastic ones were and she just looked at me funny.

SunDeck
02-19-2008, 10:34 AM
If they can find a way to charge you for it, they will.

Look at the bottled water industry.

Oh! Another good one. And this is probably one for the "things I don't get" thread, but I just picked up a bottle of Dasani and noticed that it has an expiration date. Riddle me that one, I tell ya.

SunDeck
02-19-2008, 10:43 AM
I know all that, but I just can't help picking on language sometimes. I can be a bit of a smart :mooner: at times. The other day I saw some grapes in a grocery and I asked why they were so expensive and the young girl told me that they were organic. I asked her where the plastic ones were and she just looked at me funny.

But taking the science thing a little further, the label organic is a reaction to the use of "inorganic" products. Essentially, by farming organically, one sticks with methods derived from natural processes, rather than inorganically created chemicals. For the most part, that means staying away from pesticides and herbicides, but it may mean other things as well.

There has always been some conflict about whether manufactured fertilizers should count as "Inorganic", and now that I'm away from the horticultural world I have lost track of the debate. But I remember that many products containing nitrogen are made from urea, which is basically chicken droppings. Organic to be sure, but still not the same as compost which generally offers lower amounts of nitrogen, but within a nice soup of materials that have been chewed up and pooped out by microorganisms.

Anyway, it may be an oversimplification of organic farming, but I think it is pretty safe to say that it is a rejection of using inorganic compounds in agriculture.

BRM
02-19-2008, 10:59 AM
Fuel
Propane (in the winter)
Groceries
Hay and grain for the horses/livestock (also in the winter)

camisadelgolf
02-19-2008, 12:27 PM
insulin and other various diabetic supplies

Free public health care would be nice.

GAC
02-19-2008, 08:27 PM
Oh! Another good one. And this is probably one for the "things I don't get" thread, but I just picked up a bottle of Dasani and noticed that it has an expiration date. Riddle me that one, I tell ya.

Most bottled water is via reverse osmosis. One can get an RO system installed in their homes for around $300 nowadays (the prices have really dropped over the last several years). Figure up the cost savings in the long run if people are so hooked on drinking "purified" water.

Ltlabner
02-19-2008, 08:32 PM
Food...by far.

Free public food would be nice.

Rojo
02-19-2008, 08:34 PM
Food...by far.

Free public food would be nice.

Food stamps.

SandyD
02-19-2008, 08:35 PM
Most bottled water is via reverse osmosis. One can get an RO system installed in their homes for around $300 nowadays (the prices have really dropped over the last several years). Figure up the cost savings in the long run if people are so hooked on drinking "purified" water.


If you had to drink lower Mississippi River water, you'd filter it or drink bottled water too.

OldRightHander
02-19-2008, 08:38 PM
If you had to drink lower Mississippi River water, you'd filter it or drink bottled water too.

I was in your neck of the woods not long ago and stopped somewhere to eat. I got water because I didn't want to pay for a drink and that was some of the nastiest water I have had in years. I'll remember that in the future.

SandyD
02-19-2008, 09:21 PM
It's only the city, and near suburbs that use river water, I think. Northshore has other sources. But I don't think any of the rivers and streams around here are very "fresh."

If you get stuck down this way some time, drop me a pm if you want.

OldRightHander
02-19-2008, 09:31 PM
It's only the city, and near suburbs that use river water, I think. Northshore has other sources. But I don't think any of the rivers and streams around here are very "fresh."

If you get stuck down this way some time, drop me a pm if you want.

The thought has crossed my mind, but that last couple times I've passed through it's been late at night and I've been on a time sensitive run. If I ever get down there with some time on my hands, I'll let you know.

bengalsown
02-20-2008, 11:23 AM
Gas and electric bill
Food
Addiction to electronics

Highlifeman21
02-20-2008, 11:40 AM
Dead cow.

We should go to livestock auctions and buy a whole cow and have it butchered how we want, and then donate what we won't eat, or sell what we won't eat.

But noooooooooo. We'll go to Costco and stock up on whole filet or ribeye or strip, or we'll see what Stew Leonard's is having on sale for whole cuts and buy from them, or if Newington Meat Center is having a sale on their 21 day dry aged delmonico I'll pick up some of that as well, but we easily put down 5 lbs of steak a week between the two of us. That adds up.

We drink plenty of wine with the dead cow, but usually we'll stock up on cheap/everyday wine at Trader Joe's, and that'll only cost between 40-50 a case, so that's not bad. It's when we're drinking "occasion wine" when it's not an occasion that the cost of grapes adds up.

SunDeck
02-20-2008, 04:24 PM
Just a nit to pick here Highlifeman21, I think you mean dead cattle. More precisely- probably dead steer. Cows do get slaughtered, but that's usually some tough meat. It certainly ain't rib eye.


This information brought to you courtesy of my son's 4H program. Me? I thought they were cows, too.
:p:

KWM
02-20-2008, 04:37 PM
My largest bill is, believe it or not, my cable bill. $90 per month. I need extended basic for Fox Sports Detroit and the only premium channel I have is HBO. Damn Time-Warner. They are bandits.

vaticanplum
02-20-2008, 04:55 PM
My largest bill is, believe it or not, my cable bill. $90 per month. I need extended basic for Fox Sports Detroit and the only premium channel I have is HBO. Damn Time-Warner. They are bandits.

My biggest bill (outside of the much-discussed student loans) is also my cable bill. The pathetic part is that my cable bill includes my phone, cable and internet, and to get a land line alone through the local telephone company would save me all of $20 a month. Which is precisely why I have cable despite my many misgivings about it.

Highlifeman21
02-20-2008, 06:00 PM
Just a nit to pick here Highlifeman21, I think you mean dead cattle. More precisely- probably dead steer. Cows do get slaughtered, but that's usually some tough meat. It certainly ain't rib eye.


This information brought to you courtesy of my son's 4H program. Me? I thought they were cows, too.
:p:

I appreciate the nitpick.

I need to be corrected when I am incorrect!

Steers and cattle would make more sense. Cows are probably more dairy, I would then assume?

Redsfaithful
02-20-2008, 06:49 PM
How much has this service helped you save on an average trip to the grocery store?

It's hard to tabulate exactly because I track our food spending overall and we go to Costco once a month or so, but our grocery food bill has dropped about 20% since we started using it. Would be higher without the Costco mixed in, but I can't say exactly how much.

nate
02-20-2008, 06:53 PM
Probably:

*property taxes
*insurance
*food
*heating gas (but only in winter)
*wine

SunDeck
02-20-2008, 07:34 PM
I appreciate the nitpick.

I need to be corrected when I am incorrect!

Steers and cattle would make more sense. Cows are probably more dairy, I would then assume?

Continuing to consult the 4H material here....
A cow is a female that has given birth. Before that she's a heifer. So, yes I believe cows are more associated with dairy farming since birthing a calve is what causes a cow to produce milk. I suppose if we lived in Wisconsin, my 4H materials would deal with dairy rather than beef and hogs, but I digress.
Obviously, or until cloning is perfected I suppose, you have to have cows to produce more beef cattle, too. I am not sure, but my guess is those cows are also used for meat after producing calves for a few years, but just not the kind you find at Jeff Ruby's.

GAC
02-20-2008, 08:12 PM
It's only the city, and near suburbs that use river water, I think. Northshore has other sources. But I don't think any of the rivers and streams around here are very "fresh."

If you get stuck down this way some time, drop me a pm if you want.

We put an RO system in when we lived in the city of Bellefontaine because their water was simply terrible. And an RO helped tremendously. We now live in the country where we have a well, and the water is far better. But we still utilize RO.

And I just don't trust water treatment plants. Why? When I worked for Drackett Co., which made such household products as Windex, Drano, and others - when we made a "bad batch" when dump it into a holding tank where we used chemicals to "neutralize" it, and then from there it went to the city water treatment plant for further "treatment". Now we are always told that by the time they are done with it it is safe for consumption. And it probably is. But it still alarmed me.