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OldRightHander
02-19-2008, 02:03 PM
I was talking with my wife last night about how some folks will go to great lengths to express themselves without using a word that could be construed as a profanity. My wife's grandmother, who passed last year was one of those. She wouldn't use the word "bugger", which is considered worse overseas than it is here, so she would substitute "bangladeshi". I wonder how people in Bangladesh would feel about that. Then you have words like darn, shoot, heck, etc. It seems that people want to use an expletive but don't want to use the actual word, so they use these substitutions, as if using another word when the original is what is actually in your mind, is any better. My wife and I don't use bad language ourselves but we still find it humorous how people find all of these silly ways to supposedly get around it. Maybe it's human nature to see how close we can get to the line without crossing it. My wife summed it up pretty well when she said, "What's the difference if you don't say it, but you were thinking it anyway?" And that's coming from someone who is offended by profane language and doesn't even like to hear it spoken by others.

WMR
02-19-2008, 02:05 PM
I tailor my language to my company.

Caveat Emperor
02-19-2008, 02:07 PM
I tailor my language to my company.

Get used to that -- I still live in a slight bit of fear that my self-filtering system will fail one day when I'm on the record in court.

BRM
02-19-2008, 02:08 PM
I tailor my language to my company.

This is what I try to do as well. It doesn't always work but I at least try.

WMR
02-19-2008, 02:08 PM
Get used to that -- I still live in a slight bit of fear that my self-filtering system will fail one day when I'm on the record in court.

hehehehehehe

I @#$%'ing object, your honor!!!

Caseyfan21
02-19-2008, 02:09 PM
I tailor my language to my company.

Always. I don't really worry too much about my language in the college environment with my friends but when I'm speaking with professors, family, etc. I never use any curse words. Spend too much time in one company or the other though and slip ups can happen.

WMR
02-19-2008, 02:09 PM
This is what I try to do as well. It doesn't always work but I at least try.

Prolly my most difficult time is when I'm watching a UK game over at my Grandparents house. :eek: I still usually manage pretty well.

BRM
02-19-2008, 02:11 PM
Prolly my most difficult time is when I'm watching a UK game over at my Grandparents house. :eek: I still usually manage pretty well.

For me it's when the kids are around. Sometimes they will sneak into the room when I'm watching IU or the Colts. They have heard some colorful words the last few years during those times.

WMR
02-19-2008, 02:12 PM
For me it's when the kids are around. Sometimes they will sneak into the room when I'm watching IU or the Colts. They have heard some colorful words the last few years during those times.

:lol:

BRM
02-19-2008, 02:16 PM
The Mike Davis era brought out the worst in me. I'm sure it had a similar affect on most Hoosier fans.

OldRightHander
02-19-2008, 02:17 PM
I still find it interesting how different words are viewed differently by different cultures. My wife and most of her family have no problem saying hell in all sorts of situations but would be shocked to hear the use of some of those more British curses that we don't have a problem with here.

Screwball
02-19-2008, 02:49 PM
I was talking with my wife last night about how some folks will go to great lengths to express themselves without using a word that could be construed as a profanity. My wife's grandmother, who passed last year was one of those.

My dad's one of those too. It's pretty funny actually to hear someone say things like "Now where'd I put those dog-gone papers?" or "Gosh darn-it Josh, what the heck were you thinking?!" He doesn't even cuss when he's upset or after a few cold ones. In fact, just the other day I heard him say the word crap and I about fell out of my chair.

Speaking of drinking and not cussing, man that gets difficult. Despite being 24, I have to avoid saying those dreaded four-letter words out of respect for my dad and stepmom - not to mention my brother and sister who have a bunch of rugrats running around. Of course every Christmas, Thanksgiving, family get-together, etc., after knocking back a few Bud Lights I've come dangerously close to dropping the F-bomb. "You won with Jack fff...reaking 6?!" or "That's such bullsh...ugar." It hasn't happened yet, but I know it will someday.

&$%#, that's gonna be awkward.

Razor Shines
02-19-2008, 02:54 PM
This is a very interesting topic to me. And one that I've been thinking about lately. I've recently switched jobs and now work with a lot of construction guys. So needless to say the amount of profanity I hear and use has gone up quite a bit.

Like WilyMo and most others I generally adjust my language according to the audience. And at work it's almost anything goes, almost. I work with guys who...I'll say believe in God(as do I), in what way is a mixture. One thing most of the guys I work with won't do is take God's name in vain. So you'll hear quite a few colorful phrases on the job site but you won't hear God's name taken in vain. My favorite curse word right now is "gosh d*****" mostly because it sounds so stupid. And because I heard Billy Bob Thorton say it in the movie Ice Harvest and it made me laugh. I'm not sure if taking the word "God" out of it makes it any better, I guess mostly it makes us feel better about it.

I know for a fact that a lot of people will think that is completely stupid, and I understand that and I'm fine with it. Feel free to let me know.

And I hope I didn't get too religious, I don't think I did, but I apologize in advance.

Screwball
02-19-2008, 03:04 PM
One thing most of the guys I work with won't do is take God's name in vain. So you'll hear quite a few colorful phrases on the job site but you won't hear God's name taken in vain..

I've atually noticed my favorite TV shows are using the phrase GD uncensored more and more. South Park, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and The Shield use several GDs in every episode.

While FX allows the "S" word to fly, I find it doesn't come close to having the same offensive ring (for lack of a better term) that GD does. I've become increasingly desensitized to it, but I remember at first cringing at the use on TV, and this is coming from a guy who's been known to sound like a sailor a time or two.

George Anderson
02-19-2008, 03:06 PM
This is a very interesting topic to me. And one that I've been thinking about lately. I've recently switched jobs and now work with a lot of construction guys. So needless to say the amount of profanity I hear and use has gone up quite a bit.



Back before I became an office guy I used to work out in the construction field and my cursing was really bad. In fact that was about the time I was coaching you and the rest of those Community Little League hooligans so you probally heard me cuss a time or two :D

Razor Shines
02-19-2008, 03:22 PM
Back before I became an office guy I used to work out in the construction field and my cursing was really bad. In fact that was about the time I was coaching you and the rest of those Community Little League hooligans so you probally heard me cuss a time or two :D

There may have been a couple times, but one thing I can say for sure that there was way more cussing done by the players than the coaches. :evil:

MrCinatit
02-19-2008, 03:30 PM
Get used to that -- I still live in a slight bit of fear that my self-filtering system will fail one day when I'm on the record in court.

"Your honor...right there is one guilty ________ ______"



I find myself having to clean up my language quite a bit at work. Until a month ago, I worked overnights, around no customers - so the foul language flowed free and easy.
Now, in the presence of customers, I have to watch my mouth. Can be difficult sometimes.

Heath
02-19-2008, 03:32 PM
What a ******* stupid *** thread. Dumb ****.


:welcome:

SunDeck
02-19-2008, 04:27 PM
I have worked at several landscaping companies and I found it interesting that some of them were "cussing shops" and some weren't. By far, the most enjoyable ones to work for were the ones where people didn't cuss. Sure, there was the occasional swear, but it was rare. In contrast, a cussing shop was one where people did it constantly and it was often accompanied by a lot of off color material.

There was also a positive correlation between the cleanliness and state of the equipment and the cleanliness of the language. And there was a positive correlation (IMO) between the cleanliness of the language and the quality of the work done. Me? I was never a big cusser at work; it's just not part of my nature whether I worked at a cussing shop or a non-cussing shop. But it did have an affect on my relationship with coworkers. The more foulmouthed the crew, the more likely I found it would be that they would think I was weird.

Now I am out of that field entirely and working at a public library. Suffice it to say, there is no cussing here at all, not by the staff at least.

Roy Tucker
02-19-2008, 04:54 PM
I cleaned it up when we had children.

Now that they are a little older, I've relaxed my rules just a smidge. Still not very often at all, but a well-timed $#(* or %$()* can make those heads whip around pretty quickly.

There are high-level execs I work around that profusely use f-bombs as verbs, adjectives, and nouns. I must say, I think a little less of them for it.

*BaseClogger*
02-19-2008, 04:57 PM
okay, I've missed a Sunday school lecture or twelve in my time, but who decided what are cuss (curse?) words and which aren't?

15fan
02-19-2008, 05:22 PM
I cleaned it up when we had children.


It's amazing what you change when there is a young, impressionable being in your presence.

Especially when that young, impressionable being is highly likely to replicate and / or repeat less than ideal actions at rather inoportune times.

TeamCasey
02-19-2008, 05:29 PM
I mother said, "Sugar!", my whole life.

I never heard her swear until I went to college.

She was a world traveller and often travelled alone or with other women. They always would get hit on. She told me, "F*** off" works in every language.

I almost fell out of my chair. I never thought it was possible that she could say that word. LOL.

It made us closer in a way because it was the day I realized that she saw me as an adult.

GoReds33
02-19-2008, 05:32 PM
okay, I've missed a Sunday school lecture or twelve in my time, but who decided what are cuss (curse?) words and which aren't?I've often wondered the same thing. I guess it's just what society's deamed as unacceptable. It goes the same with alot of things in life. For instance, who decided what's beautiful of not?

Chip R
02-19-2008, 05:34 PM
okay, I've missed a Sunday school lecture or twelve in my time, but who decided what are cuss (curse?) words and which aren't?


George Carlin. ;)

klw
02-19-2008, 05:39 PM
1. Once rented a room from a nice older southern woman who always said "H- E- double hockey sicks"
2. I sound silly swearing though some make it an artform

3. I love the line in Eurotrip "You guys swear on a whole different level over here."

4. I swear more the longer I work as a Public Defender

5. Any attempt to not swear goes down the tube if I hit my head.

SunDeck
02-19-2008, 06:11 PM
My dad has only cussed around me occasionally. And I have only heard him drop the F Bomb once and that was because he was telling me what someone else said.

I am sure his language is different around his friends, but he's held on to the "I don't cuss around my kids" philosophy for over forty years now. That's pretty impressive.

I have a couple of made up cuss words that I use; they came from A Christmas Story.

KronoRed
02-19-2008, 06:17 PM
I have lots of replacement swear words, I rarely curse no matter the company, and the replacement words always get a chuckle from others :D

Roy Tucker
02-19-2008, 06:23 PM
Don't cuss,
Call on Gus,
Gus will cuss for all of us

*BaseClogger*
02-19-2008, 06:28 PM
I have lots of replacement swear words, I rarely curse no matter the company, and the replacement words always get a chuckle from others :D

"fudgecicles"

"mother trucker!"

http://www.vivalagraham.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/butters.jpg

"Oh Hamburgers!"

KronoRed
02-19-2008, 06:39 PM
Not as awful as those though ;)

WMR
02-19-2008, 06:39 PM
Not as awful as those though ;)

Do you get especially ornery if you drink too much Sierra Mist? ;)

KronoRed
02-19-2008, 06:43 PM
I curse for real if I have to drink that swill

*BaseClogger*
02-19-2008, 06:45 PM
Not as awful as those though ;)

hmmm... "mother trucker" has always been a hit for me :D

Dom Heffner
02-19-2008, 06:50 PM
I curse like a sailor. I use the F-Bomb as a gerund, a verb, an adjective. If it made sense to put an -ly on the end, I'd be there.

I use it in business- usually when I'm annoyed and always after I've asked permission.

Most people end up cursing more than I do once they know. It's like a club- once they know you're in it, they're all about exercising the priveleges of membership right along with their fellow clubmate.

I've often argued that there should be no curse words. In other words, I think we should just allow all words into the vernacular, stripping them of the power they have. You can't get offended at something that isn't considered offensive. A few generations, and no one would know the difference.

I've always found it a bit odd that someone would be offended if I switched out the "r" for an "m" in the word darn. Frickin' is a wholly acceptable word, but look out if you switch out a few letters for the dreaded "u." They mean the same thing, I guess, but one is more acceptable than the other, because we all want a word that we can say in front of all audiences that means the same thing as the word we aren't supposed to say.

And it sounds an awfully lot like that word, but it's not that word, so it's okay. It's a little silly when you think about it.

I even had a teacher once who wouldn't let us use curse word substitutes because he would argue that they meant the same thing, so what's the difference? He had a point, I guess.

Anyway, I always thought we should go the other way and just not ban any words. But I doubt that would ever work, because I think we enjoy having these words that only we can say. They make us feel grown up, or they make us feel rebellious against our parents. Either way is a win, isn't it?

And they're powerful, and nobody likes to give up power.

Johnny Footstool
02-19-2008, 06:59 PM
I was talking with my wife last night about how some folks will go to great lengths to express themselves without using a word that could be construed as a profanity. My wife's grandmother, who passed last year was one of those. She wouldn't use the word "bugger", which is considered worse overseas than it is here, so she would substitute "bangladeshi". I wonder how people in Bangladesh would feel about that. Then you have words like darn, shoot, heck, etc. It seems that people want to use an expletive but don't want to use the actual word, so they use these substitutions, as if using another word when the original is what is actually in your mind, is any better. My wife and I don't use bad language ourselves but we still find it humorous how people find all of these silly ways to supposedly get around it. Maybe it's human nature to see how close we can get to the line without crossing it. My wife summed it up pretty well when she said, "What's the difference if you don't say it, but you were thinking it anyway?" And that's coming from someone who is offended by profane language and doesn't even like to hear it spoken by others.

It's all about manners. We can think anything we like, but if we're considerate of our company, we'll avoid saying things that will offend them. Using substitute curse words is infinitely more considerate than blurting out whatever vile junk we're thinking.

Much like the father in "A Christmas Story", I am a bit of an artist in profanity in my private conversations. But in public, I turn into Yosemite Sam -- "razza-frazzin' friggity frack".

I find that a well-delivered substitute word can have as much, if not more, impact than a curse. Saying "son of a *****" in public will garner some scowls, but blurt out an unexpected "son of a filth", and you'll get a few chuckles.

And at the ballpark, screaming "Hit the friggin' ball" won't get you ejected from the family section.

Unassisted
02-19-2008, 07:01 PM
I cleaned it up when we had children.

Now that they are a little older, I've relaxed my rules just a smidge. Still not very often at all, but a well-timed $#(* or %$()* can make those heads whip around pretty quickly.

There are high-level execs I work around that profusely use f-bombs as verbs, adjectives, and nouns. I must say, I think a little less of them for it.Amen to all of that, Roy.

It's amazing how the addition of kids to the household makes it easier to put a profanity filter on the brain. Mine will hear it from me not more than once or twice a year now but only when a point needs special emphasis.

I've worked in some ultra politically-correct academic settings where nary a profanity was uttered. Yet I've also observed first-hand how salty the tongues get among upper management when the door is closed in those same settings. It always made me wonder whether those upper management folks were two-faced in other ways when I heard the f-bombs rolling out on select occasions.

Razor Shines
02-19-2008, 07:09 PM
But I doubt that would ever work, because I think we enjoy having these words that only we can say. They make us feel grown up, or they make us feel rebellious against our parents. Either way is a win, isn't it?

And they're powerful, and nobody likes to give up power.
I think you're most certainly correct on this.


I curse like a sailor. I use the F-Bomb as a gerund, a verb, an adjective. If it made sense to put an -ly on the end, I'd be there.

The F-Bomb as an adverb. Why not? I'm sure people could work that in.

OldRightHander
02-19-2008, 08:29 PM
Bill Cosby is the master of getting you to think of a word without saying it, and sometimes that's more funny than if he just came out and said it. The joke that comes to mind is where he says that if you're about to get hit by a truck, "First you say it, then you do it."

Ltlabner
02-19-2008, 08:58 PM
I've often argued that there should be no curse words. In other words, I think we should just allow all words into the vernacular, stripping them of the power they have. You can't get offended at something that isn't considered offensive. A few generations, and no one would know the difference.

I tend to agree with you. I'd much rather people put their energy into saying what they really mean, instead of dancing around trying to choose the right safe, PC and euphamistic words.

sonny
02-19-2008, 11:13 PM
I like to say just half-cuss words. It still has the rawness of the actuall cuss word PLUS the added bonus of me being so agitated that I can't even finish the word.

Ex: What the Ffffff....
Well Ain't this some shhhhh....

the last sound usually coming from clenched teeth. Very satisfying indeed.

BUTLER REDSFAN
02-20-2008, 12:29 AM
Much like the father in "A Christmas Story", I am a bit of an artist in profanity in my private conversations. But in public, I turn into Yosemite Sam -- "razza-frazzin' friggity frack".

Oh Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuddgggggggggggeeeeeeeeeeee

BUTLER REDSFAN
02-20-2008, 12:32 AM
My boss at the rent to own store I worked at a long time ago was a woman. We got along great in everyway except when she got real upset at something she lost it. She loved yelling out "Oh,JFC." I would try to get as far away from her as I could so the lightning bolt would only hit her.

WVRed
02-20-2008, 01:32 AM
I cuss a lot more than I used to.

To me it helps get the point across a lot better. Obviously there are some places that I bite my tongue, especially at work.

I hate it when kids use half-cuss words like shoot, darn, dang-it etc. I want to tell them "Look, if you are wanting to say the actual word, just say it. Nobody thinks you are cool doing it."

BoydsOfSummer
02-20-2008, 01:56 AM
Depending on time and place, I could make Al Swearengen blush.

ABEsolutely
02-20-2008, 09:24 AM
Believe it or not, the "fake" words aren't always substituting for what someone's really thinking. It's possible that some people don't have the "bad" words on their mind at all. For me, words like shoot and daggone just come out. You don't have to worry about something else slipping in that case. And I know I'm not cool, so who cares? I don't think people should assume that any word is a substitute for anything else. Don't you think that maybe they should be given the benefit of the doubt?

OldRightHander
02-20-2008, 09:48 AM
Believe it or not, the "fake" words aren't always substituting for what someone's really thinking. It's possible that some people don't have the "bad" words on their mind at all. For me, words like shoot and daggone just come out. You don't have to worry about something else slipping in that case. And I know I'm not cool, so who cares? I don't think people should assume that any word is a substitute for anything else. Don't you think that maybe they should be given the benefit of the doubt?

I see your point. That's pretty much where I am. I just don't like to use foul language. But you have to wonder about the origin of the substitute words. I think they came about in an effort to avoid the other word, even if some of us aren't tempted to use the other words in the first place. And of course the point of my initial post was to kind of poke fun at that mindset, like my wife's grandmother using bangladeshi instead of bugger.

Red in Chicago
02-21-2008, 12:21 AM
I love to swear in both English and Italian ;)

OldRightHander
02-21-2008, 12:30 AM
The worse cuss word I can think of right now is "cheap freight." I just lost a load bid on an expedited load board to some other company that bid .50 a mile to run a 600 mile time sensitive run. Who in the @#$% can afford to run for .50 a mile? A trend nowadays is for carriers to combine several small loads onto a larger truck and run each load for a rate too low to be run in an exclusive vehicle. That's making it harder for smaller companies like me that run smaller vehicles to find freight that pays well enough. When companies do junk like that, the shippers start expecting to pay those rates going forward and then more drivers are forced to either haul cheap junk or sit. It has me on the verge of using some language I'm normally not tempted to use.

Stephenk29
02-21-2008, 12:35 AM
my college coach says "dookie" a lot. It's hard not to erupt in laughter when he's trying to chew us out. "Stop playing grab butt out there. Dookie plays!"

WVRed
02-21-2008, 11:21 AM
Believe it or not, the "fake" words aren't always substituting for what someone's really thinking. It's possible that some people don't have the "bad" words on their mind at all. For me, words like shoot and daggone just come out. You don't have to worry about something else slipping in that case. And I know I'm not cool, so who cares? I don't think people should assume that any word is a substitute for anything else. Don't you think that maybe they should be given the benefit of the doubt?

I am speaking more about kids than I am anything. You know they want to cuss, but are afraid of getting in trouble, so they use the "fake" words.

WVRed
02-21-2008, 11:23 AM
my college coach says "dookie" a lot. It's hard not to erupt in laughter when he's trying to chew us out. "Stop playing grab butt out there. Dookie plays!"

http://kenny.smoovenet.com/grabpics/mackey.gif

OK, Who made a dookie in the school urinal?

GoGoWhiteSox
02-22-2008, 04:54 PM
I cuss only when I'm mad, or agitated. I've found that if I use a substitute like "darn," or something like that, I'm only holding in my anger. Since I'm not one that holds in anger well, I usually just say what I want to say, and move on. I feel a little better if I just vent, rather than hold it in.

There are some people that I've met before that would see me for almost a month before they heard me cuss. The looks on their faces when they would hear me drop a F-bomb for the first time would be priceless!

Spring~Fields
02-22-2008, 05:19 PM
I think that words and language for cultures change over time.

It seems to me that most usage of words today that are called profanity are expressions of frustration or fear. They don’t really reference an act of procreation or the passing of bodily waste, they are often used to express an upset or a frustration.

Instead of correctly saying that I am perplexed and frustrated over something, I in the past might have uttered you f ing such and such gd this and that. Or ah S… when actually I was afraid of some negative consequences that might not even occur, I should have just said that I was worried and afraid of a bad outcome.

Sometimes I just found myself being lazy and not expressing or communicating correctly, opting for profanity and eventually through not exercising a proper vocabulary, losing that vocabulary to the use of profanity. I think that I have changed that in my mind now and no longer take the cheap way out with profanity that really doesn‘t explain much to other‘s that might hear me anyway. I think!! I hope so, I got tired of hearing myself. :(

sonny
02-22-2008, 10:46 PM
I think that words and language for cultures change over time.

It seems to me that most usage of words today that are called profanity are expressions of frustration or fear. They don’t really reference an act of procreation or the passing of bodily waste, they are often used to express an upset or a frustration.

Instead of correctly saying that I am perplexed and frustrated over something, I in the past might have uttered you f ing such and such gd this and that. Or ah S… when actually I was afraid of some negative consequences that might not even occur, I should have just said that I was worried and afraid of a bad outcome.

Sometimes I just found myself being lazy and not expressing or communicating correctly, opting for profanity and eventually through not exercising a proper vocabulary, losing that vocabulary to the use of profanity. I think that I have changed that in my mind now and no longer take the cheap way out with profanity that really doesn‘t explain much to other‘s that might hear me anyway. I think!! I hope so, I got tired of hearing myself. :(

F@#$'in Good Post!

WebScorpion
02-25-2008, 11:14 AM
I think that words and language for cultures change over time.

It seems to me that most usage of words today that are called profanity are expressions of frustration or fear. They don’t really reference an act of procreation or the passing of bodily waste, they are often used to express an upset or a frustration.

Instead of correctly saying that I am perplexed and frustrated over something, I in the past might have uttered you f ing such and such gd this and that. Or ah S… when actually I was afraid of some negative consequences that might not even occur, I should have just said that I was worried and afraid of a bad outcome.

Sometimes I just found myself being lazy and not expressing or communicating correctly, opting for profanity and eventually through not exercising a proper vocabulary, losing that vocabulary to the use of profanity. I think that I have changed that in my mind now and no longer take the cheap way out with profanity that really doesn‘t explain much to other‘s that might hear me anyway. I think!! I hope so, I got tired of hearing myself. :(

Man, you must be really old. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/old.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

Just kidding. My mother always told me curse words were largely used by people who were either too lazy to think of a more descriptive word or too poorly educated to know one. I'm old too, so I now agree with her assessment. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/loopy.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)