PDA

View Full Version : Another reason to hate MLB: CTR game blogs clipped



LoganBuck
03-04-2008, 01:09 PM
From C. Trent's blog

and BREAKING NEWS...

I will not be live blogging, because MLB is cracking down on giving you information. They don't want any competition for their gamecast. I will, however, update after every half-inning. I'll proabably still write live, just delay it. It's a battle of semantics, but I'm only doing what I'm told by my people at 1530Homer.com. I appologize. It seems MLB doesn't feel its content is good enough to go for a straight-up competition. I'll do what I can. And again, I'm sorry.

M2
03-04-2008, 01:12 PM
Wow, unbelievably stupid decision by MLB. Hasn't anybody explained to them that they should want an ecosystem around their games?

Tom Servo
03-04-2008, 01:12 PM
wow lame

Cyclone792
03-04-2008, 01:15 PM
And the dumb continue to get dumber.

Oh well, hopefully Trent can get away with delaying his postings by a few minutes.

Unassisted
03-04-2008, 01:16 PM
If MLB's out there looking for this stuff, don't be surprised if your favorite Reds message board gets a cease and desist letter about PBP in game threads. The best way to prevent that is to not do PBP. React, but don't describe.

Chip R
03-04-2008, 01:17 PM
Shmucks.

registerthis
03-04-2008, 01:29 PM
Looks like someone's been taking their cues from the RIAA.

What an absurd demand.

registerthis
03-04-2008, 01:31 PM
If MLB's out there looking for this stuff, don't be surprised if your favorite Reds message board gets a cease and desist letter about PBP in game threads. The best way to prevent that is to not do PBP. React, but don't describe.

Maybe you could just put the word "Yay!" or "Boo!" in front of everything. As in:

"Yay! A 2-0 count to Keppinger."

"Boo! Arroyo just threw ball four."

"Casual indifference! Corey Patterson just entered the game."

dabvu2498
03-04-2008, 01:39 PM
If MLB's out there looking for this stuff, don't be surprised if your favorite Reds message board gets a cease and desist letter about PBP in game threads. The best way to prevent that is to not do PBP. React, but don't describe.

I wonder if it would make a difference that this site is completely non-commercial. Probably not.

Unassisted
03-04-2008, 01:44 PM
I wonder if it would make a difference that this site is completely non-commercial. Probably not.Competition is competition. Whether a site profits from providing a service that competes with MLB.com is not likely to be something that would matter to MLB.com.

Unassisted
03-04-2008, 01:47 PM
Maybe you could just put the word "Yay!" or "Boo!" in front of everything. As in:

"Yay! A 2-0 count to Keppinger."

"Boo! Arroyo just threw ball four."

"Casual indifference! Corey Patterson just entered the game."Nice try, but no. That still competes with the descriptions and accounts of the game provided on MLB.com.

registerthis
03-04-2008, 01:52 PM
Competition is competition. Whether a site profits from providing a service that competes with MLB.com is not likely to be something that would matter to MLB.com.

Would that be a service that competes with MLB.com though?

KronoRed
03-04-2008, 01:52 PM
MLB really knows how to give fans what they want

KronoRed
03-04-2008, 01:54 PM
Competition is competition. Whether a site profits from providing a service that competes with MLB.com is not likely to be something that would matter to MLB.com.

Hey Reds.com has a message board, should we be worried that RZ will be shut down because it's "competition" to the official board? :help:

CTA513
03-04-2008, 01:55 PM
Fay posted the same thing on his blog.

BCubb2003
03-04-2008, 01:58 PM
Nice try, but no. That still competes with the descriptions and accounts of the game provided on MLB.com.

Yes, MLB invented "expressed written consent."

The solution is to code everything.

"That's a three-run shot by Abner Dean of the Porkopolitans. I can't believe manager Salty Cooker is batting him sixth ..."

Dan
03-04-2008, 01:59 PM
MLB HAS to do this, because, they DO own the rights to the game descriptions. Legally, they can be sued successfully if they AREN'T cracking down on others using the accounts and descriptions, especially if sites are making a profit off the information.

or something like that

Chip R
03-04-2008, 02:03 PM
If MLB's out there looking for this stuff, don't be surprised if your favorite Reds message board gets a cease and desist letter about PBP in game threads. The best way to prevent that is to not do PBP. React, but don't describe.


I doubt that's going to happen. We're getting the content in the games that go into the game thread second hand (radio, Gametracker, TV, blogs). I don't think there is anyone at the game typing play by play into their Blackberries or whatever mobile device they are using and posting it in the game thread. I think they would have a problem with that.

Strikes Out Looking
03-04-2008, 02:16 PM
Bud Selig is satan.

dougdirt
03-04-2008, 02:17 PM
MLB HAS to do this, because, they DO own the rights to the game descriptions. Legally, they can be sued successfully if they AREN'T cracking down on others using the accounts and descriptions, especially if sites are making a profit off the information.

or something like that

I wasn't aware that that applied to games you attended. If you listened to the game on the radio, or watched it on tv, I know its good for that, but I was not aware that it applied to games you are physically at.

BCubb2003
03-04-2008, 02:44 PM
They're basically enforcing it through press passes, at least for now.

TRF
03-04-2008, 03:08 PM
I don't think this is legal, and I think their wording hurts them. I don't think MLB can own a description. I'm sure they think they do, but my description of the game may be very different than theirs, and they do not own my opinions or view of the game. Fascists.

Everytime MLB does something this stupid it boggles my mind. Have they not realized that one of the reasons they have seen the increase in attendance is because of sites like Redszone and writers blogs? Hell half the time the pbp come from gamecast or sportsline or MLB's whatever. who cares as long as it reaches more fans withou costing them money?

dumb, dumb, dumb.

Caseyfan21
03-04-2008, 03:26 PM
So will they soon be blocking cell phone reception inside stadiums for fear that I may be at a game, call a friend, and describe the action?

This is really getting ridiculous.

BCubb2003
03-04-2008, 03:46 PM
NBA vs. Motorola decided that you can't copyright facts, but MLB can still limit access, which means C. Trent would have to buy a ticket, or just join the RedsZone game thread, I guess.

RedsManRick
03-04-2008, 03:50 PM
I don't understand this at all. The courts just ruled that the events of the game, as recorded in statistics, are public information and as such can be used by fantasy sports sites without royalty to MLB. How is blogging any different that a live box score?

redsmetz
03-04-2008, 03:52 PM
I don't think this is legal, and I think their wording hurts them. I don't think MLB can own a description. I'm sure they think they do, but my description of the game may be very different than theirs, and they do not own my opinions or view of the game. Fascists.

Everytime MLB does something this stupid it boggles my mind. Have they not realized that one of the reasons they have seen the increase in attendance is because of sites like Redszone and writers blogs? Hell half the time the pbp come from gamecast or sportsline or MLB's whatever. who cares as long as it reaches more fans withou costing them money?

dumb, dumb, dumb.

I checked after this question came up and it was a Louisville Courier Journal reporter who had his press credentials withdrawn and was ejected from an NCAA baseball tournament game when he was blogging from Louisville's game in the 2007 tournament.

All the media sources were incensed and talked about taking legal action, but I can't find any further stories as to a follow up.

RedsManRick
03-04-2008, 03:56 PM
It's possible that this isn't a "legal" decision so much as it is MLB saying "if you want to keep your press passes, we recommend you don't live blog our games." It's not a legal barring so much as it is a new condition by which they are now choosing to do business with their media coverage providers.

I agree though, it's like the RIAA -- game coverage is not a closed system where you need to fight for your piece of the pie. More coverage in more ways makes the pie bigger.

TRF
03-04-2008, 03:59 PM
It's possible that this isn't a "legal" decision so much as it is MLB saying "if you want to keep your press passes, we recommend you don't live blog our games." It's not a legal barring so much as it is a new condition by which they are now doing business with their contracted content deliverers.

This I buy. But with stadiums offering wi-fi access, how can they stop the live blogging by us mere amateurs? Their actions contradict their design.

TeamCasey
03-06-2008, 06:45 PM
How is blogging about a game any different than reporting about a game in the day's newspaper or getting the scores on the TV news?

Hello ...... mlb ....... the world is faster ..... the world is connected ...... this is the information age.

Catch up or get left behind.

jojo
03-06-2008, 06:59 PM
I don't think this is legal, and I think their wording hurts them. I don't think MLB can own a description.

They do until a someone forces a court to tell them they don't.....

Chip R
03-06-2008, 07:07 PM
How is blogging about a game any different than reporting about a game in the day's newspaper or getting the scores on the TV news?

Hello ...... mlb ....... the world is faster ..... the world is connected ...... this is the information age.

Catch up or get left behind.


Because it's live and the blogger hasn't paid for the privilege to broadcast the action like TV and radio and the online gametrackers do. Newspapers and the 6:00 news isn't live. They are reporting something that has already happened. MLB doesn't have a problem with that.

CrackerJack
03-06-2008, 08:24 PM
Radio hosts can't report action as it happens either in any major sport, always having to wait a period of time or limit updates to scores every so often.

I think this is pretty typical and not an evil Bud Selig conspiracy. I just didn't know it would apply to spring training games.

Unassisted
03-06-2008, 10:09 PM
I think this is pretty typical and not an evil Bud Selig conspiracy. I just didn't know it would apply to spring training games.
Networks and stations paid for the rights to broadcast those games. If people can read live blogs as a substitute for listening to/watching the broadcasts, that has the potential to affect the ratings and ultimately dilute the value of the broadcast rights. That's why MLB cares... it has the potential to cost them money down the line.

Roy Tucker
03-06-2008, 11:25 PM
"Bob Bowman" and "MLBAM" make for some interesting googling... He's got a keen eye for new media ventures and is a watchdog.

http://www.bizofbaseball.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1810&Itemid=81