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*BaseClogger*
03-04-2008, 08:57 PM
I bought a bunch of these cards when I was younger but I never learned how to play the game. A friend and I were going through my card collection, and he recognized them. Turned out, he also had some from his earlier days. Anyways, after learning how to play I have realized this is a really fun game, but I am just at the cusp of understanding it. Is there anybody else who has played Magic? What would you suggest to better understand the game? If it helps, I'm 17 and I think I got these cards when I was about 11, so they are from around... 2001?

dougdirt
03-04-2008, 09:20 PM
I played in middle school for two years or so, so that was about 11-12 years ago (man I am getting old fast). Honestly, with the internet at your fingertips I would suggest finding some websites and do some reading. Play a bunch and I am sure you will learn more as you go along.

*BaseClogger*
03-04-2008, 09:23 PM
I played in middle school for two years or so, so that was about 11-12 years ago (man I am getting old fast). Honestly, with the internet at your fingertips I would suggest finding some websites and do some reading. Play a bunch and I am sure you will learn more as you go along.

I have tried this, but man its really hard to follow what they are saying because there are so many cards and it is so complex...

dougdirt
03-04-2008, 09:25 PM
Have any friends who are a bit more experienced than you?

*BaseClogger*
03-04-2008, 09:30 PM
Have any friends who are a bit more experienced than you?

nah... we all just collected the cards for the pictures... kinda like pokemon :D

dougdirt
03-04-2008, 09:33 PM
I don't know what pokemon was all about.... that was well past my age group when it came out. I know that there was a MTG video game at one time. Maybe tracking it down would help you understand the game a little more. I haven't played the game in probably 8 years, so I don't really have much to offer in terms of what things mean/do or even where the game has gone since then.

WMR
03-04-2008, 09:34 PM
Wikipedia it.

NorrisHopper30
03-04-2008, 09:34 PM
I'm 17, you can have all of my Magic cards, I ran into them the other day..

Caveat Emperor
03-04-2008, 09:34 PM
Wow... I had a ton of Magic cards when I was in junior high. I guess that would've been about the same time as you, doug -- 11 or 12 years ago.

I think they're all in a box somewhere in my basement. Probably next to the POGs and the Hootie & The Blowfish CDs.

*BaseClogger*
03-04-2008, 10:07 PM
Well I've got the basics of gameplay down, but whats the proper way to make a deck? It seems like some of my cards are really basic (apparently from a base set) with a white background and then some have a black background...

Johnny Footstool
03-04-2008, 10:33 PM
You want to design your deck so that you can play a card on each turn, including the first. You want a lot of small creatures, a few big ones, and two or three ways to keep your opponent from attacking you (artifacts, counterspells, etc.). It's a good idea to make a 50 card deck with 18 lands, 10 small creatures, 7 big creatures, 5 artifacts, 5 protection/dispell cards, and 5 offensive spells. Always use 2 different colors in your deck. And remember not to include more than 4 of any one card -- it's against the rules.

BTW - Yes, I've played before.

dougdirt
03-04-2008, 10:35 PM
Well I've got the basics of gameplay down, but whats the proper way to make a deck? It seems like some of my cards are really basic (apparently from a base set) with a white background and then some have a black background...

Just from different sets thats all. It all depends on what kind of deck you want to build. I know there are websites out there that will tell you what cards to use to build your decks and what kind of things they can accomplish with the deck itself. I used to use some of the websites around to help me build specific decks, I assume there has to be sites out there still just like it.

*BaseClogger*
03-04-2008, 10:45 PM
You want to design your deck so that you can play a card on each turn, including the first. You want a lot of small creatures, a few big ones, and two or three ways to keep your opponent from attacking you (artifacts, counterspells, etc.). It's a good idea to make a 50 card deck with 18 lands, 10 small creatures, 7 big creatures, 5 artifacts, 5 protection/dispell cards, and 5 offensive spells. Always use 2 different colors in your deck. And remember not to include more than 4 of any one card -- it's against the rules.

BTW - Yes, I've played before.

This was very helpful--thank you. Always 2 colors? Which colors do you suggest?

Johnny Footstool
03-05-2008, 12:09 AM
This was very helpful--thank you. Always 2 colors? Which colors do you suggest?

Yes, always 2 colors. One-color decks can be negated with just a few cards. Three-color decks are too unwieldy -- you never seem to get the right colors in your hand.

As for which combinations work best, it depends on the cards you own. I haven't played in 10 years, but I remember having good luck with red and green decks. I'd use a bunch of red attack spells like lightning bolt and fireball, plus some small red creatures to use as cannon fodder. On the green side, I'd use a bunch of those elves that give you an extra land, plus a handful of the larger green creatures.

SteelSD
03-05-2008, 12:13 AM
I bought a bunch of these cards when I was younger but I never learned how to play the game. A friend and I were going through my card collection, and he recognized them. Turned out, he also had some from his earlier days. Anyways, after learning how to play I have realized this is a really fun game, but I am just at the cusp of understanding it. Is there anybody else who has played Magic? What would you suggest to better understand the game? If it helps, I'm 17 and I think I got these cards when I was about 11, so they are from around... 2001?

Heh.

I hold two Magic the Gathering State Championships and multiple top 8 and top 4 finishes. I've played in a ton of Pro Tour qualifiers and have played against pro players in Minneapolis during the last Grand Prix held there. I'll also be competing in MTG Regionals again later this spring. That tourney allows for Nationals slots for the top players so I'll be playtesting hard with my team over the next couple of months. I've spent thousands of dollars on this game, but I've won thousands of dollars as well by playing it. Just depends on how serious you are about winning.

So I'm your huckleberry.:)

Here's the best Magic the Gathering website out there:

http://magic.tcgplayer.com/

Here's another website where you can download a program called Apprentice and add every MTG virtual card ever created (it's free) for online play against real live opponents:

http://magic-league.com/

Johnny is giving you good feedback, except that a tourney-legal deck is a minumum of 60 cards. His four of any one card maximum is in effect for current standard play. He's right in that you want enough low-cost cards that you can play something on every turn, but the power of each card comes into play as well.

Just because a card costs less mana than another, that doesn't mean it's a better option for your deck. If you want a fast and consistent deck you want is a collection of 60 cards that can inflict maxim damage within the first five turns of the game. If you're looking for a deck that denies resources (cards, creatures, etc.) then you'll need cheap early-turn kill and/or counter spells followed by medium-to-large creatures your opponent can't easily remove.

In short, you need to figure our your plan, find the best cards for their mana cost, and then commit to a strategy that maximizes deck efficiency. And considering that you'll be shuffling, you'll also want to keep only the good starting hands that fit your strategy and throw the rest back to a mulligan. Each mulligan you take means you draw one less card. The major issue I see with mulligans is too few land. If you're playing a 60-card deck and have a ton of low-mana spells, you should be playing at least 23 land. If your mana curve is a bit higher or if you really want a chance at casting spells that are five mana or higher, you need 24 or even 25 land. That's easy to do considering the amount of potentially dangerous land (stuff that can turn into creatures) in this cycle.

The best advice I can give you at this point is to find your play style. There are the following card colors:

White (small creatures, some creature control, enchantment kill, and some lifegain)

Blue (counterspells, bounce, card drawing, playing things on your opponent's turn)

Black (opponent discard, life loss for effect, creature control)

Red (direct damage, fast small creatures, some artifact kill, more direct damage)

Green (big creatures for good costs, mana development, some lifegain, enchantment and artifact kill)

Multi-color (some fatties and under-costed stuff but for different and sometimes off-color mana)

Artifacts (generally crap except for Pithing Needle and Loxodon Warhammer)

Land (Basics that you'll need to cast stuff, and some lands you can turn into creatures in every color)

Right now the standard format is up in the air. There are a lot of viable competitive decks. Go to the second link I gave you and click on "Decks" on the left. Right now, Blue/White, Green/White/Black, and mono-Red seem to be the decks to beat given the right cards, but that can change on a moment's notice given the environment.

If you just want to play for fun, then remember- 60 cards, maximum two colors, and make sure you have at least 23 land. And don't get all giddy about huge creatures because they always cost more.

Good luck and have fun!

SteelSD
03-05-2008, 12:29 AM
Yes, always 2 colors. One-color decks can be negated with just a few cards. Three-color decks are too unwieldy -- you never seem to get the right colors in your hand.

Noooo...

I've won a State Championship with a mono-colored deck (Academy), have two other top 4 finishes with mono-colored decks (Goblins, Rogue Black), and a top 8 Pro Tour qualifier finish with a pure-black Necropotence creation. And I finished second in 2006 States with a three-color deck (Solar Peace), losing two games to one in the final. During Grand Prix Minneapolis, mono-color White Weenie dominated the format. For a newer player, mono-color decks are actually a good thing because they eliminate the need for expensive multi-colored land and they can actually be more consistent and faster than a two-color deck.

You'll just have to trust me on this one, but multiple Pro-Tour qualifiers, Grand Prix's, Nationals, and even World Championships have been won using mono-color and 3-color or 4-color decks.

camisadelgolf
03-05-2008, 07:41 AM
I played for a few years in junior high, but it wasn't worth the money it took to stay the best, so I stopped playing. I still have hundreds of cards ordered alphabetically, but I figure I'll just set them aside, let them collect value, and then sell them on eBay in a few decades.

FutureRedsGM
03-05-2008, 08:49 AM
I was a player from around 93 to around 05. I thought the game became stale when they starting sanctioning events and limiting the cards that you could play with. I never played the sanctioned tourneys because I liked my "old" cards and the market was getting saturated with new sets that were being forced on players if they wanted to be active on the tournament scene. My favorite deck of all time was a mono black discard and land descruction deck (hymns, spectors, sink holes). I sold out on ebay a couple years ago for around $1000.

Johnny Footstool
03-05-2008, 10:45 AM
Johnny is giving you good feedback, except that a tourney-legal deck is a minumum of 60 cards.

Yeah, my memory is fuzzy. I thought it was a 40 card minimum.

Still, you want to be as close to the minimum as possible. The more cards you use, the greater the chance that the one card you really need won't come up.


Noooo...

I've won a State Championship with a mono-colored deck (Academy), have two other top 4 finishes with mono-colored decks (Goblins, Rogue Black), and a top 8 Pro Tour qualifier finish with a pure-black Necropotence creation. And I finished second in 2006 States with a three-color deck (Solar Peace), losing two games to one in the final. During Grand Prix Minneapolis, mono-color White Weenie dominated the format. For a newer player, mono-color decks are actually a good thing because they eliminate the need for expensive multi-colored land and they can actually be more consistent and faster than a two-color deck.

You'll just have to trust me on this one, but multiple Pro-Tour qualifiers, Grand Prix's, Nationals, and even World Championships have been won using mono-color and 3-color or 4-color decks.

I believe you about tournament play, where card cost and card scarcity are not issues. I'm thinking more along the lines of recreational play, with decks build from common cards found in foil packs.

I played a couple of small tournaments and did well (2nd and 3rd). I gave up the game when I realized the game was less about creativity and more about economics. Building a deck from limited resources is a challenge and a lot of fun. Building a deck of "perfect" cards is a different game.

TRF
03-05-2008, 10:55 AM
my god you guys need to get out more. :)

kidding. I played a bit when most of you were in middle school (I was in college). It's fun but IMO requires a lot of time and devotion. Maybe requires is not the right word. the game can suck you in real quick, causing you to lose track of time.

SteelSD
03-05-2008, 11:50 AM
Yeah, my memory is fuzzy. I thought it was a 40 card minimum.

Still, you want to be as close to the minimum as possible. The more cards you use, the greater the chance that the one card you really need won't come up.

40-card minimum is for sealed deck or booster draft tournament play. And you're 100% accurate about wanting to keep it at the minimum number in order to maximize card drawing probability.


I believe you about tournament play, where card cost and card scarcity are not issues. I'm thinking more along the lines of recreational play, with decks build from common cards found in foil packs.

Ok. Sure. You're right there, although there are cheap options for mono-Red (weenies/burn), mono-White (White Weenie/Kithkin) and mono-Green (mana acceleration into fat creatures) even in casual play.


I played a couple of small tournaments and did well (2nd and 3rd). I gave up the game when I realized the game was less about creativity and more about economics. Building a deck from limited resources is a challenge and a lot of fun. Building a deck of "perfect" cards is a different game.

It's an investment, that's for sure. I've played tourneys with decks worth well over $500.00. But I've also done quite well at tourneys with decks worth less than $50.00 and with almost no rares. Early versions of mono-Red "Sligh" (named for it's creator) used zero Rares and a very low mana-curve to dominate the tournament scene for quite a while. "Red Deck Wins" was a huge cheap uppercut to the MTG tourney scene when it won Pro Tour LA a few years ago. A cheap White Weenie deck with four (IIRC) cheap rares took a World Championship quite a few years back. I've made States top 8 with a mono-Red Goblin deck using exactly four Rares cards in the main deck.

Unfortunately, things have gone in the other direction more recently.

I think you'd really like the sealed Two Headed Giant format. That's a blast as you and a partner build two decks out of sealed product and then play collaboratively against another team. Unfortunately, it appears that format had a very short run (two years) as a sanctioned "State" tournament, but it's still pretty popular for weekend tourneys.

RedsManRick
03-05-2008, 03:32 PM
I played back during 4th edition and ice age -- mid 90's, middle school -- the heyday apparently. I always like my green/white deck because it felt more strategic, but it took forever to develop (green creatures tend to be bigger and more expensive) and I often got killed before I got anything rolling due to land problems. Always had problems finding the right balance. My brother was almost always Red and/or Black, focused on quicker, often direct damage with a wall off tinier creatures (damn you Will o' the Wisp!) to stop my green brute offense. I was never a big fan of blue, which seemed to me like a meta-game.

In the later sets, they started introducing more mechanics which complicated strategy and I got bored with it. I never really embraced my nerdom either, and Magic wasn't too popular with the athletic types. I never really played it competitively and ended up giving all my good cards to my brother for Christmas one year.

Fun stuff though. My only advice is to think simple and think synergy. Sort of like baseball, designing your offense around a string of unlikely events is a poor strategy. Get 'em on, get 'em in, and prevent your opponent from doing the same.

*BaseClogger*
03-05-2008, 04:11 PM
I played back during 4th edition and ice age -- mid 90's, middle school -- the heyday apparently. I always like my green/white deck because it felt more strategic, but it took forever to develop (green creatures tend to be bigger and more expensive) and I often got killed before I got anything rolling due to land problems. Always had problems finding the right balance. My brother was almost always Red and/or Black, focused on quicker, often direct damage with a wall off tinier creatures (damn you Will o' the Wisp!) to stop my green brute offense. I was never a big fan of blue, which seemed to me like a meta-game.

In the later sets, they started introducing more mechanics which complicated strategy and I got bored with it. I never really embraced my nerdom either, and Magic wasn't too popular with the athletic types. I never really played it competitively and ended up giving all my good cards to my brother for Christmas one year.

Fun stuff though. My only advice is to think simple and think synergy. Sort of like baseball, designing your offense around a string of unlikely events is a poor strategy. Get 'em on, get 'em in, and prevent your opponent from doing the same.

Yeah, I certainly won't be buying any of the new sets. I prefer looking/using the old cards. I wish I could find a bunch of cards from the 90's for cheap.
Anyways, I checked and I've got cards from the sixth, seventh, and eight core sets. I like the idea of a red deck with goblins and spells that directly inflict damage on an opponent. So far, I'm looking at a deck of cheap goblins, Goblin King, Trained Org, an array of Lava Axes/Lightning Blasts/Shocks, and about 20 mana. How does that sound?
Also, what is a "mana curve"?
And, I read on a site that Blue is considered the strongest color. Is that true?

Joseph
03-05-2008, 04:24 PM
Any of you cats nerdy enough to have played the Star Wars CCG Decipher put out back in the early/mid 90s?

For the record, I was, so I'm not pointing fingers.

*BaseClogger*
03-05-2008, 04:25 PM
Any of you cats nerdy enough to have played the Star Wars CCG Decipher put out back in the early/mid 90s?

For the record, I was, so I'm not pointing fingers.

I see... hide your shame in my thread! :D

Joseph
03-05-2008, 04:28 PM
Its easier than taking all the shame into its own thread. :)

pahster
03-05-2008, 04:37 PM
Any of you cats nerdy enough to have played the Star Wars CCG Decipher put out back in the early/mid 90s?

For the record, I was, so I'm not pointing fingers.

Yep. Also the Star Trek CCG. :cool:

Johnny Footstool
03-05-2008, 05:13 PM
Yep. Also the Star Trek CCG. :cool:

I own a few of those cards, given to me by a friend who wanted me to play him.

I think I played it twice.

Dom Heffner
03-05-2008, 05:38 PM
I've won a State Championship with a mono-colored deck (Academy), have two other top 4 finishes with mono-colored decks (Goblins, Rogue Black), and a top 8 Pro Tour qualifier finish with a pure-black Necropotence creation. And I finished second in 2006 States with a three-color deck (Solar Peace), losing two games to one in the final. During Grand Prix Minneapolis, mono-color White Weenie dominated the format. For a newer player, mono-color decks are actually a good thing because they eliminate the need for expensive multi-colored land and they can actually be more consistent and faster than a two-color deck.

Steel, I'll bet you a beer at the next Redszone gathering that savafan breathed a sigh of relief in regards to you hitting on his soon to be wife when he read the above.

;)

Caveat Emperor
03-05-2008, 05:54 PM
Any of you cats nerdy enough to have played the Star Wars CCG Decipher put out back in the early/mid 90s?

I had a couple decks of that when I was in middle school / freshman year. I collected more for the sake of collecting all things Star Wars. I think I've played a grand total of 3 games of that in my life.

As to Magic cards -- are the older ones from the 90's worth anything at this point? I had a ton of the regular white-border cards from c1994-1995. I think they're still in the basement somewhere.

Ltlabner
03-05-2008, 06:38 PM
http://www.caltanco.com/mypictures/NA_LOGO.jpg

:p:

*BaseClogger*
03-05-2008, 09:43 PM
As to Magic cards -- are the older ones from the 90's worth anything at this point? I had a ton of the regular white-border cards from c1994-1995. I think they're still in the basement somewhere.

I have a feeling they are worth a decent amount of change...

SteelSD
03-05-2008, 10:17 PM
Steel, I'll bet you a beer at the next Redszone gathering that savafan breathed a sigh of relief in regards to you hitting on his soon to be wife when he read the above.

;)

Meh. I'd never really hit on sava's wife-to-be.

Now, that's not to say she wouldn't hit one me...:p:

It is sort of funny though when my buddy and I (both upper-30's professional types) are playing at a tourney and one of our wives shows up. It's like most of the players have no idea what to do. I swear that the best Two-Headed Giant tourney partner is a hot chick in a low-cut tee shirt. She doesn't even know how to play. All she has to do is sit there, take direction, and the waning attention span of the opposition will take care of itself. ;)

SteelSD
03-05-2008, 10:36 PM
I have a feeling they are worth a decent amount of change...

Depends on what set they're from and what they are. For example, Unlimited was the last white border set to contain "Power Nine" cards like Black Lotus, the five Mox cards, Ancestral Recall, Time Walk, and Timetwister.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_Nine

I've owned three of the five Moxen (Jet, Pearl, Ruby) and Time Walk in my day (all Unlimited white border), but sold them for well over $100 each. A few other Unlimited white border cards can draw some cash (Forcefield, Gauntlet of Might, Berserk, Chaos Orb, Illusionary Mask) but most of those are strictly for collector value as they're not major Vintage tourney cards. The rest of the Unlimited "money" cards (the dual lands) were reprinted in Revised as well (and for the last time). Those are well worth having, but the dropoff in potential value from Unlimited to Revised sets is quite severe.

Of course, both Alpha (the first printing) and Beta are both more valuable than their later printings due to the black borders. It might seem weird that a Beta Black Lotus will likely bring more dollars in the market than an Alpha Black Lotus, but the Alpha set isn't actually tournament-legal because they have slightly different card "corners"; leaving them as "marked" cards if included in a tourney deck. So if a player wants a black-bordered "Power Nine" card, they have only the Beta set from which to select.

Lots of nuances on the value scene for older cards and value is pretty consistently driven by either rarity or what's playable at the time.

*BaseClogger*
03-05-2008, 10:57 PM
Depends on what set they're from and what they are. For example, Unlimited was the last white border set to contain "Power Nine" cards like Black Lotus, the five Mox cards, Ancestral Recall, Time Walk, and Timetwister.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_Nine

I've owned three of the five Moxen (Jet, Pearl, Ruby) and Time Walk in my day (all Unlimited white border), but sold them for well over $100 each. A few other Unlimited white border cards can draw some cash (Forcefield, Gauntlet of Might, Berserk, Chaos Orb, Illusionary Mask) but most of those are strictly for collector value as they're not major Vintage tourney cards. The rest of the Unlimited "money" cards (the dual lands) were reprinted in Revised as well (and for the last time). Those are well worth having, but the dropoff in potential value from Unlimited to Revised sets is quite severe.

Of course, both Alpha (the first printing) and Beta are both more valuable than their later printings due to the black borders. It might seem weird that a Beta Black Lotus will likely bring more dollars in the market than an Alpha Black Lotus, but the Alpha set isn't actually tournament-legal because they have slightly different card "corners"; leaving them as "marked" cards if included in a tourney deck. So if a player wants a black-bordered "Power Nine" card, they have only the Beta set from which to select.

Lots of nuances on the value scene for older cards and value is pretty consistently driven by either rarity or what's playable at the time.

why isn't "Sol Ring" as valuable as the other nine?

SteelSD
03-05-2008, 11:59 PM
Also, what is a "mana curve"?

The "mana curve" is really nothing more than the concept that you want to be able to cast something every single turn or have the ability to cast something on every single turn. So the casting costs of your cards are important. The following link contains a pretty good explanation of the "curve":

http://www.magic-league.com/article/79/how_to_build_a_deck.html


And, I read on a site that Blue is considered the strongest color. Is that true?

It's cyclical and it depends on the available card pool. In practice, the best color is the deck that's capable of winning most often versus the rest of the field. But that field is ever-changing and sometimes it can morph overnight into something completely unexpected. That happened in 1998 with the printing of Urza's Saga, when Blue became the best color on the planet because of the printing of the following card:

http://magic.tcgplayer.com/db/cards/7073.jpg

Tolarian Academy is the best MTG Land ever printed. In fact, outside of Black Lotus and the five Moxen, I consider Tolarian Academy to be the most powerful Magic the Gathering card ever printed as it, in combination with other cards, allowed a first-turn kill by forcing the opponent to draw every card in their deck plus one. If a card is supposed to be drawn and can't be, that's a win. Here's the creatureless decklist drawn from memory:

Academy 1998

Instants (12):

2x Power Sink
2x Meditate
4x Intuition
4x Stroke of Genius

Sorcery (8):

4x Windfall
4x Time Spiral

Enchantment (3):

3x Mind over Matter

Artifacts (15):

4x Lotus Petal
4x Grim Monolith
3x Scroll Rack
4x Voltaic Key

Land (22):

4x Tolarian Academy
4x Ancient Tomb
12x Island

A first-turn kill is pretty complicated and invovles a pretty good draw (but nowhere near impossible), and my teammate got it the very first time he playtested the deck. What you want to do is drop a bunch of cheap artifacts and then build huge mana using Mind Over Matter to constantly untap your Tolarian Academy.

At the time, we didn't have the kind of online info or play we have now so the deck was actually created by a good number of folks in isolation. Personally, I feel that my version was the best to ever hit the tournament scene and my work rewarded me with a State Championship after finishing the last game of the finals on my turn two on the play after my opponent cast only a Jackal Pup. It was the last play he got to make. The rest of the time he just sat there watching me tap and untap stuff in order to make him draw his deck plus about 250 cards.

It was fun, but it was also completely unfair. It was so unfair that within a month of States over half of the deck was banned. But those cards weren't banned quickly enough to keep Tomi Hovi from winning Pro Tour: Rome with an optimized "Extended" format deck.

Today, it's a rock/paper/scissors game. Everything good has its foil and as soon as that foil is found, the game shifts. Blue is still good in some ways, but that color's ability to just flat out counter anything for two mana is gone so it relies on the color's ability to cast most stuff (including creatures) on the opponent's turn. Right now, just about every color is good in some combination. It's a healthy format.

*BaseClogger*
03-06-2008, 12:04 AM
I saw a listing for a deck with no creatures and thought it had to be a mistake... :eek:

camisadelgolf
03-06-2008, 08:54 AM
I saw a listing for a deck with no creatures and thought it had to be a mistake... :eek:

I always did that. I loved my direct damage decks. I consistently defeated nearly all my opponents in four turns or less.

SteelSD
03-06-2008, 10:59 AM
why isn't "Sol Ring" as valuable as the other nine?

http://magic.tcgplayer.com/db/cards/1571.jpg

It's not as valuable due to the combination of availability and power level. While the "Power Nine" are all Rares, Sol Ring is an Uncommon; so there are a lot more of them around. Also, Sol Ring was reprinted in the Revised set and the Power Nine were discontinued after Unlimited.

While Sol Ring is a powerful card, it's not nearly as broken as its 0-casting cost completely unfair cousins, the Moxen and Black Lotus. A Revised or Unlimited Sol Ring will likely bring anywhere between $10 to $20 on the open market depending on condition. A Beta Sol Ring can likely end up well over $50.00 even in lightly played condition as it's currently the only black-bordered tourney-legal issue of the card.

cincyinco
03-06-2008, 05:53 PM
is there anywhere online to view prices for cards.. like a "beckett" but for MTG? I also have a ton of cards sitting around, collecting dust.

SteelSD
03-06-2008, 11:16 PM
is there anywhere online to view prices for cards.. like a "beckett" but for MTG? I also have a ton of cards sitting around, collecting dust.

You can check both eBay and http://magic.tcgplayer.com/ for prices. Just understand that if you're selling to a dealer, you'll likely get only near 25% to 50% of the value for most cards. If you have high-dollar rares like any of the "Power Nine" you'll probably be able to do a bit better than that.

If you've done the research and have some good stuff, feel free to shoot me a PM as I'm always interested in buying collections.

camisadelgolf
09-11-2012, 07:01 AM
I just rediscovered my cards. It's a good thing I have no one to play the game with.

Brisco
09-11-2012, 10:22 PM
I just rediscovered my cards. It's a good thing I have no one to play the game with.

I taught my kids to play and just play with them. I love the game because it combines the strategy of chess, the people skills of poker and the random fun of craps.

I have always been more the collector than player... I have probably 30-40 thousand cards... Most of which I have won in tournaments or traded for. I have assembled a fair number of complete sets and have a set of power nine plus two extra moxen. My biggest collection is dual lands... I have 92 of them including two full playsets.

Spazzrico
09-11-2012, 10:50 PM
I just revealed the game to my nephew. I told him he could have my cards if I could find them, but I have no clue where they have gone.

My memories of Magic are good ones, mostly college when I'd go home.....get stoned and play for hours listening to Zeppelin. Good Times.

TeamSelig
09-11-2012, 11:55 PM
I catch losers stealing these cards all the time at Wal Mart

*BaseClogger*
02-17-2013, 04:26 PM
Uh oh, I played with some friends last night and have an itch that can't be satisfied right now...

camisadelgolf
02-17-2013, 04:40 PM
Uh oh, I played with some friends last night and have an itch that can't be satisfied right now...
I play with friends every Sunday before Walking Dead starts.