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View Full Version : Jason Kendall will bat 9th for the Brewers



cincinnati chili
03-09-2008, 01:41 PM
http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20080308&content_id=2413512&vkey=spt2008news&fext=.jsp&c_id=mil&partnered=rss_mil

Discuss.

WMR
03-09-2008, 01:43 PM
Everyone's mimicking the genius. :lol:

M2
03-09-2008, 01:49 PM
If this is going to be in vogue throughout the division, maybe Corey Patterson can be the Reds' #9 hitter?

rotnoid
03-09-2008, 02:05 PM
I see the argument they're trying to make. But I can't stop thinking about the number of plate appearances this is going to cost a guy like Kendall. If they're sold on his versatility with the bat, why take it out of his hand several dozen times a year?

I can see the sense in flipping the 8 and 9 guys, just because it will give the top of the order more chances to drive in runs, but why take a guy from the top and move him all the way to the bottom? I'm sure there are some here much smarter than me that can explain it. I'm just at a loss.

PuffyPig
03-09-2008, 02:31 PM
If the theory is that the worst hitter on your team should bat 8th, isn't that the perfect spot for Kendall?

redsrule2500
03-09-2008, 02:32 PM
Dunn should bat 9th. All those solo homers would just make it a perfect +1 run spot.

KronoRed
03-09-2008, 02:40 PM
If this is going to be in vogue throughout the division, maybe Corey Patterson can be the Reds' #9 hitter?

Patterson, Castro, Ross, we have a lot of competition for the 9th spot.

MrCinatit
03-09-2008, 02:52 PM
Patterson, Castro, Ross, we have a lot of competition for the 9th spot.

Castro should be in the 11 spot - at the highest.

RedsManRick
03-09-2008, 03:07 PM
Bravo Ned Yost. Yost, Bob Melvin (bullpen usage), Manny Acta (OBP emphasis & approach). It's happening slowly, but analytically derived strategies are finding advocates in active managers. It's interesting to me the way in which analytical people are labeled by certain people -- be it respectful or hostile.



"You've had a lot of smart people looking at it and crunching numbers and seeing if, numbers-wise, it made sense."

Those smart people decided that batting Kendall ninth, a departure from the conventional baseball wisdom of batting the pitcher in the final spot, did make sense. They thought it gave the Brewers an edge, which should translate into an opportunity to score more runs.

"More runs means more wins," Yost said. "Sometimes, you've gotta get outside the box a little bit."

KronoRed
03-09-2008, 03:10 PM
Castro should be in the 11 spot - at the highest.

I was thinking 26th ;)

RedsManRick
03-09-2008, 03:11 PM
I was thinking 26th ;)

42nd in my book. Right behind Stanton at 41. :thumbup:

traderumor
03-09-2008, 04:54 PM
Bravo Ned Yost. Yost, Bob Melvin (bullpen usage), Manny Acta (OBP emphasis & approach). It's happening slowly, but analytically derived strategies are finding advocates in active managers. It's interesting to me the way in which analytical people are labeled by certain people -- be it respectful or hostile.As if this is a new wave? Managers have always been thinking through things and looking at numbers to make decisions, obviously at varying levels. This isn't a new thing, its just publicized more because of places like this. One of our very own, known as "Captain Hook" wrote the book on modern bullpen usage patterns with the BRM, just as one example.

Spitball
03-09-2008, 11:01 PM
If your pitcher is likely to go only five and bat maybe once, I can maybe see the strategy. Otherwise, jeesh...:rolleyes: