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GAC
03-19-2008, 06:19 PM
My daughter, who has had her license just over 6 months, has joined to the ranks of the ticketed. :lol:

It seems that upon leaving school this afternoon she rear-ended another student. There was a line of cars waiting to turn onto the main road. So as each car was able to make the turn the line would creep forward.

My daughter creeped too far and bumped the car in front of her. There was no damage to either car. The girls got out, surveyed the situation, exchanged information and went on their way. But when the girl got home her Mother made her call the police, who in turn came out to each house to file a report.

In the long run, my daughter got sighted for failure to assure a clear distance.

What was funny was listening to her "explain" to me what had happened. When I finally got all the info out of her, I told her that whenever you rear-end someone it's your fault and you're going to get sighted.

Her response?.....

"It's not my fault Dad! The car's too friggin long!"

All I can say is.....She's a blonde. :p:

KronoRed
03-19-2008, 06:22 PM
I have a short car if you wanna trade.
http://www.avto-otchet.net/CarReviews/2425_0.jpg
;)

GAC
03-19-2008, 06:37 PM
That's a Matchbox!

OldRightHander
03-19-2008, 07:28 PM
Car...too long?:laugh: Let her drive what I drive for a while.

rotnoid
03-19-2008, 07:36 PM
You just made my night. Glad to hear no one or car was hurt.

Spring~Fields
03-19-2008, 07:50 PM
But when the girl got home her Mother made her call the police, who in turn came out to each house to file a report.

In the long run, my daughter got sighted for failure to assure a clear distance.



Gee thanks mom, always nice to donate cash to the courts when it wasn't necessary.

GAC
03-19-2008, 08:02 PM
Gee thanks mom, always nice to donate cash to the courts when it wasn't necessary.

I thought the same thing too. On one hand I can understand her wanting to get a police report to protect themselves because they don't know anything about the other party involved in the accident.

But her actions ended up getting my daughter sighted, and she now has to appear in juvenile court. Thanks Mom. :thumbup:

My daughter said the other car was packed with six teenage girls in it, and not one of them had their seatbelts on. So they are lucky, in that sense, that the didn't stay at the scene and wait for the police to come and do the report, or else someone else would have been sighted. ;)

Spring~Fields
03-19-2008, 08:11 PM
But her actions ended up getting my daughter sighted, and she now has to appear in juvenile court. Thanks Mom. :thumbup:



Yeah, well maybe it will serve some good down the road, I know my one and only visit to juvenile court over speed sharpened my senses. :)

GAC
03-19-2008, 08:26 PM
Yeah, well maybe it will serve some good down the road, I know my one and only visit to juvenile court over speed sharpened my senses. :)

Thats what I told my daughter. It's a "learning" life lesson. Take this situation, see what you did was wrong, which was not paying attention, and take corrective action for future reference. I've taught my kids - in fact I've drilled it into them - be a defensive driver, not an offfensive one. Always be on the lookout because you don't know what the "other guy" is going to do.

kbrake
03-19-2008, 09:06 PM
I wish that could have been my way to learn about "failure to assure a clear distance". My senior year of high school I was going with a group of about 20 friends to a Reds game and about 15 miles from GABP I slammed my Honda Accord into the back of a Ford Explorer. I was going about 40 and got distracted with 4 other people in the car. Lesson learned, just wish I would have thought about that excuse when my dad was asking me what happened haha.

OldRightHander
03-19-2008, 10:48 PM
But her actions ended up getting my daughter sighted, and she now has to appear in juvenile court. Thanks Mom. :thumbup:


Was she blind before?

Caseyfan21
03-19-2008, 10:59 PM
I thought the same thing too. On one hand I can understand her wanting to get a police report to protect themselves because they don't know anything about the other party involved in the accident.

But her actions ended up getting my daughter sighted, and she now has to appear in juvenile court. Thanks Mom. :thumbup:

My daughter said the other car was packed with six teenage girls in it, and not one of them had their seatbelts on. So they are lucky, in that sense, that the didn't stay at the scene and wait for the police to come and do the report, or else someone else would have been sighted. ;)

I had a similar situation happen when I was in high school. We always left school and crept down the main road for about 2 miles. Undoubtedly at least once a week someone would rear end someone with all the kids being distracted. One day I was rear ended. Funny thing was it was by my best friend and our families were best friends too. Since the police in my hometown were notorious for citing any possible violations, especially with young drivers, I knew he was toast. Right after it happened he started to get out to see what happened but it was a light tap so I waved him back in and told him to follow me home (and definitely saved him a ticket). We got to my house and surveyed the damage. I had a 1/2" scratch on my bumper while he had hit right on his front light so he ended up having a few hundred in damage. I still make fun of him to this day about how much better my "foreign made POS" (as all my friends liked to call it) stood up his dependable ol' Chevy. Good times. :laugh:

Johnny Footstool
03-20-2008, 12:23 AM
I thought the same thing too. On one hand I can understand her wanting to get a police report to protect themselves because they don't know anything about the other party involved in the accident.

But her actions ended up getting my daughter sighted, and she now has to appear in juvenile court. Thanks Mom. :thumbup:

My daughter said the other car was packed with six teenage girls in it, and not one of them had their seatbelts on. So they are lucky, in that sense, that the didn't stay at the scene and wait for the police to come and do the report, or else someone else would have been sighted. ;)

Can't a person just go down to the police station and fill out a report on their own? I don't think it's necessary to dial 911 and have an officer visit the alleged offender.

Caveat Emperor
03-20-2008, 01:02 AM
Yeah, well maybe it will serve some good down the road, I know my one and only visit to juvenile court over speed sharpened my senses. :)

We tend to get fewer repeat customers on the traffic stuff. ;)

GAC, you're daughter is lucky on the license thing -- there's a new law on the books that requires the court to impose a mandatory "accompaniment" restriction on any minor that gets convicted on a moving violation prior to age 17 and within the first 6 months of having his/her license. The restriction requires the juvenile to be accompanied by a parent whenever they drive -- effectively ending any driving other than "practice" driving.

If she's had her license longer than 6 months, she's all good on that end.

AccordinglyReds
03-20-2008, 02:44 AM
Was she blind before?

I think the OP meant was looking for "cited." ;)

klw
03-20-2008, 09:19 AM
Get her the "Smart Car"

http://www.pinklily.com.au/images/media/smartcar.jpg

Chip R
03-20-2008, 09:20 AM
Was she blind before?

:lol:

GAC
03-20-2008, 09:32 AM
We tend to get fewer repeat customers on the traffic stuff. ;)

GAC, you're daughter is lucky on the license thing -- there's a new law on the books that requires the court to impose a mandatory "accompaniment" restriction on any minor that gets convicted on a moving violation prior to age 17 and within the first 6 months of having his/her license. The restriction requires the juvenile to be accompanied by a parent whenever they drive -- effectively ending any driving other than "practice" driving.

If she's had her license longer than 6 months, she's all good on that end.

She 's under 17. She turned 16 this past Sept 16th. She took her test somewhere right after that, so she is going to be close on the 6 months.

So if she is within the 6 months, are you saying there is a mandatory law on the books that she can then only drive with a parent "accompanying" her in the car? For how long? Till she is 17?

If that is true, then that is going to kill any plans she had of getting a part time job. She just put her application in at several places this past week.

And I'm certainly not driving her to and fro to work. ;)

I was hoping I might be able to just pay the bond and not have to appear in juvenile court.

GAC
03-20-2008, 09:53 AM
I just wish this mother had called us first before calling the police. Even the police officer said that to me when he came out to the house. But once they are called them there is nothing else they can do.

If she talked with her daughter, and if her daughter was honest about the situation - that my daughter was stopped and then inched/coasted forward and bumped the back of her car - while also going out to examine the car and seeing no damage, then we may have been able to resolve any issues/questions she may have had prior to having to call the police.

My wife had a similar situation about 2 years ago where she and another woman were backing out at the same time at a local McDonalds. The back of their vehicle bumped. They got out and looked over the vehicles, saw there was no damage to either car, and exchanged info. I guess when the woman got home her husband raised a fuss, so she called and asked me if our insurance would look her car over to see if there was possibly other damage. Now if I wanted to be a dick about it, I guess I could have said that you were both backing out at the same time when you bumped, so how do we know who was at fault? But I didn't. I called my insurance and they sent an adjustor out to their house to look the car over. Nothing was found and it was all dropped.

If that was the concern of this mother, then we could have alleviated all of this by one simple phone call.

My daughter is obviously at fault, and I want her to learn a lesson from this situation; but now it's going to not only be on her record, but it's going to cost us (her eventually) court costs/ fine and her possibly losing her license for a bit.

But I think I know why this girl might have wanted to wait to get home first. She goes to the same school as my daughter and is the same age. She had her car packed full of teenagers, which violates the law of only one other non-sibling, and none had their seatbelts on. She might have not wanted Mom to find out about that, and she would have if a police officer had been called to the scene.

Caveat Emperor
03-20-2008, 01:27 PM
She 's under 17. She turned 16 this past Sept 16th. She took her test somewhere right after that, so she is going to be close on the 6 months.

So if she is within the 6 months, are you saying there is a mandatory law on the books that she can then only drive with a parent "accompanying" her in the car? For how long? Till she is 17?

If the date she is found guilty of the moving violation (which ACDA would be) is within 6 months of her getting her license AND she is under 17, there will be a court-order requiring a parent to be present while she drives for the NEXT 6 months or until she turns 17.

The two key dates are 1.) Date of Issuance for the License and 2.) Date of Adjudication in juvenile court. She can be cited w/in the 6 month period and not get the restriction so long as the adjudication occurs outside of 6 months.

And, my understanding is that you can't just pay out juvenile court tickets -- you're required to actually be present in court for a hearing.

GAC
03-21-2008, 11:12 AM
The two key dates are 1.) Date of Issuance for the License and 2.) Date of Adjudication in juvenile court. She can be cited w/in the 6 month period and not get the restriction so long as the adjudication occurs outside of 6 months.

I was told by the police officer that I would be receiving a letter from the juvenile court. So what you are saying, if I understand you correctly, is that if she was issued her license on September 23rd, meaning she'd have her 6 months in on March 23rd, and she is not scheduled to appear in court until sometime after that date, she "technically" is outside that 6 month range and may not have to have a parent present when driving?

I'd really like to see that happen. She's a darn good kid, never a problem, and up to this point has been an excellent driver. And she won't turn 17 until this next September, and it would prevent her from getting any type of summer job if she can't drive.

Caveat Emperor
03-21-2008, 01:06 PM
I was told by the police officer that I would be receiving a letter from the juvenile court. So what you are saying, if I understand you correctly, is that if she was issued her license on September 23rd, meaning she'd have her 6 months in on March 23rd, and she is not scheduled to appear in court until sometime after that date, she "technically" is outside that 6 month range and may not have to have a parent present when driving?

You've got it.

As long as her date of admission (date she admits to the traffic offense in juvenile court) is past March 23, she won't be impacted by the new law.

If this is her first moving violation in the State of Ohio, there are no other mandatory requirements for the Magistrate to follow in terms of sentencing.

LoganBuck
03-21-2008, 02:06 PM
Have fun in Logan County Juvenile Traffic Court, GAC! My brother just had a seat belt violation and a trumped up rolling stop charge over there. The judge was reasonable, and congratulated the group of kids because no one threw up during court. He said their normally is at least one. My guess is she loses her license for 30 days, and is forced to attend "Carteens" which is a driving course for juvenile offenders.

Whoever the police officer was couldn't he have just looked the other way? I guess it is all about county revenue, but whatever happened to no harm, no foul?

OldRightHander
03-21-2008, 03:53 PM
Get her the "Smart Car"

http://www.pinklily.com.au/images/media/smartcar.jpg

That thing looks more like a speed bump than a car. I could probably fit a couple of those in my back end with some room to spare.

KronoRed
03-21-2008, 04:01 PM
I'll take one and the 70MPG it gets.

GoReds33
03-21-2008, 04:02 PM
How much does that car cost?

Ltlabner
03-21-2008, 04:16 PM
http://www.pinklily.com.au/images/media/smartcar.jpg

When in Germany we all refered to these as "Not So Smart Cars".

The guys at the plant were supprised that these weren't a hot ticket in the US. They never did quite understand that while some folks in the city might like them, most people with a brain wouldn't want to be stuck in one driving long distances (read: anything over 60 miles).

Caveat Emperor
03-21-2008, 07:33 PM
http://www.pinklily.com.au/images/media/smartcar.jpg

So where do my golf clubs hook on?

GAC
03-22-2008, 12:07 AM
Have fun in Logan County Juvenile Traffic Court, GAC! My brother just had a seat belt violation and a trumped up rolling stop charge over there. The judge was reasonable, and congratulated the group of kids because no one threw up during court. He said their normally is at least one. My guess is she loses her license for 30 days, and is forced to attend "Carteens" which is a driving course for juvenile offenders.

I am no fan or supporter of either the Logan Co. Courts or their Sheriff Dept. I deeply respect the law, but the Sheriff and a couple of their judges are jokes. They love to come down hard on the populace as a source of revenue generation; but when there are abuses ans unethical behavior discovered among their own ranks, like sheriffs taking their share of any drugs they confiscate, having sex in their cars with underage girls, or an alcoholic judge who has had 7 DUIs, yet they are handled "quietly" and he gets preferential treatment while he puts the hammer down on anyone who comes in his court charged with one, then most have little respect for them.


Whoever the police officer was couldn't he have just looked the other way? I guess it is all about county revenue, but whatever happened to no harm, no foul?

It was a city police officer who was as nice as nice could be. He wasn't called to the scene. My daughter and the other girl got out and looked at the cars, saw there was no damage but still exchanged info, and went their own way.

It was when this girl got home and told her Mom that this Mom decided she wanted a police report and called them. Therefore, once that is done,there is nothing the police officer could do. He had to follow through, which meant he had to cite my daughter.

He felt really bad about it, His sentiment was that situations like this can easily be handled between the parties involved without involving the police who then not only have to make a report, but also have to most likely cite someone.

My daughter edged forward and bumped the back of this girl's car. There was absolutely no damage to either car.

Like I said earlier - I wish this mother had used better judgment and called me first. If there had been anything wrong with her car then my insurance would have made it right. And you don't need a police report. A similar situation happened a couple years ago with my wife and my insuranace sent someone out to check over the cars.

SandyD
03-22-2008, 09:28 AM
The mom may have wanted a police report to protect her and her daughter against injury claims by her passengers or their parents. No matter how light an impact, injuries claims often creep up.

RFS62
03-22-2008, 10:22 AM
The mom may have wanted a police report to protect her and her daughter against injury claims by her passengers or their parents. No matter how light an impact, injuries claims often creep up.


Yep, exactly.

It's a sad statement on our litigious society, but I'll bet you are right, Sandy.

VR
03-22-2008, 11:15 AM
gac...my son just turned 17 this week, and has no desire to drive. Hallelujah

Long car? Pffttt.....I moved from Iowa to Oregon in this baby in 1986. At one point I was in Montana, Idaho, and Washington at the same time :thumbup:

http://www.mercuryarchive.com/1973to1978/1973MercuryMontery.jpg

redhawkfish
03-22-2008, 12:21 PM
I totalled a 68' Mustang in 1983 when I was 17 years old. No one was hurt, but I hit a Buick Electra(also used by our military as a tank:D) My dad got more for the horse insignia on the front(that was some how undamaged) than he did for the entire rest of the car.:eek:

Spring~Fields
03-22-2008, 05:46 PM
Like I said earlier - I wish this mother had used better judgment and called me first. If there had been anything wrong with her car then my insurance would have made it right. And you don't need a police report. A similar situation happened a couple years ago with my wife and my insuranace sent someone out to check over the cars.

Yes. I slid on ice and bumped into someone down at Fairfield Commons Mall and Fairfield Rd. in Jan we just pulled off at a Speedway across from the Nutter Center and exchanged information, our insurance paid them for the minor damage.
They didn't want to at first because the damage was so minor but I told them no we will pay to make it right as it was my mistake, that and the black ice that I couldn't see just crossing the over pass.

Funny thing speaking of mom's, I told the story to my mother and she said, "did you call the police" I looked at her and asked have you stopped taking your B-12 and B complex, :) I don't make donations to government agencies if I can help it.

No one was hurt but like Sandy is eluding too, afterward I was a bit nervous wondering if one of the three in the car might later come up with some alledged injury after the fact and lie.

GAC
03-23-2008, 06:34 AM
gac...my son just turned 17 this week, and has no desire to drive. Hallelujah

My oldest boy, who just turned 19, was the same way when he turned 16. He wanted to wait, and I gave no argument. Then he had major surgery on both of his Achilles tendons when he was 17, and the recup/physical therapy time carried him till last year. Now he is 19.... and the boy needs to get his license. His grandparents gave him a nice car. In fact, it's the car his sister was driving in this thread. Some one has to be driving the darn thing. I can't let it just sit parked.

11larkin11
03-23-2008, 12:58 PM
So GAC, would this be Bellefontaine High School? I'll be there tomorrow for the first baseball scrimmage of the year!! A rivalry in a scrimmage, IL vs. Bellefontaine

GAC
03-23-2008, 08:38 PM
So GAC, would this be Bellefontaine High School? I'll be there tomorrow for the first baseball scrimmage of the year!! A rivalry in a scrimmage, IL vs. Bellefontaine

It would be. Bellefontaine has a very solid baseball program and one heck of a nice field. Top notch.

11larkin11
03-25-2008, 09:37 PM
Very solid program, great facility, but the field itself isnt as great as it looks. I personally think ours at the Lake is better. Don't get me wrong, the facility is much better but I think our field is better and I love our wall.

GAC
04-11-2008, 07:52 PM
Well.... my daughter and I went to Juvenile Court this morning. The judge was very fair and objective. For a first time offender she got a 45 day suspension with driving privileges to/from school and work, a $5 fine w/court costs of $59.

BUT... and the judge told everyone this prior to court. If your child is on a restricted license, meaning being under 17, the state mandates that they will have to be accompanied by a parent/guardian at all times whenever operating a vehicle until they reach 17. They can receive no driving privileges, such as for work or school.

So any judgment he hands down will be superseded later on by the state when we receive that letter. Until then, the judge's decree stands.

Rachel just got hired at a part time job this week and starts Monday. So she is going to lose her first job when that letter arrives from the state because my wife and I both work and are going to be unable to transport her.

One other boy was there for speeding. It was his first offense - 43 mph in a 35. But because he was in the same situation as my daughter he got the same sentence, which will also cause him to lose his job.

I don't agree with that law not allowing for driving privileges for work. Punish the kids, hold them accountable; but lets be reasonable here.

LoganBuck
04-11-2008, 09:03 PM
That is terrible.

Write our State Rep about this. That is just an outrage. Some kids out there still work jobs to earn money for college, or to make ends meet at home.

http://www.house.state.oh.us/jsps/MemberDetails.jsp?DISTRICT=83

GAC
04-13-2008, 08:49 PM
That is terrible.

Write our State Rep about this. That is just an outrage. Some kids out there still work jobs to earn money for college, or to make ends meet at home.

http://www.house.state.oh.us/jsps/MemberDetails.jsp?DISTRICT=83

The judge said that the reason for the law is because 52% of first time offenders will be back before they are 17. OK. That still doesn't make sense. That's barely over half. What about that other 48% that won't?

What do kids at this age, who just acquired their license, need more then anything? Driving experience. So what does the state do? Tells them they can't drive unless Mom or Dad are with them, which is going to vastly decrease that opportunity due to work schedules. My daughter is in school all day. My wife works 2nd shift. I get up late afternoon/early evening because I work 3rds. But even then, unless I have someplace to go, some errand to run (which is rare), I stay home until I have to leave for work.

So now I guess I am suppose to find ways to take her out and let her drive so her driving skills don't deteriorate and get rusty? That seems like I, the parent, is being punished.

Like I said - I believe in responsibility and accountability; but this law is simply stupid. Again, we're talking about a 1st time offender over a very minor traffic infraction. The judge was very fair and objective... he fined her, made her attend the CarTeens class, suspended her license for 45 days with driving privileges to/from school/work. That's punitive, the punishment fits the crime, and yet she is still allowed to drive under limitations and grow in experience. But why waste his time and mine by even going to court if the state is gonna send out a letter superseding any judgment he hands down? I guess it's so a person can enter their plea to the charges. But still, the entire bureaucracy is ridiculous.

Let the local judges handle these on a case by case situation. Isn't that why they are elected? To make judgments.

Now I have to wait even longer for her to pay me back for that fine because she will loss her very first job over this. I was really looking forward to her going to work. I was going to have her start a checking account, BUY HER OWN FUEL, pay her own cellphone bill, and begin to experience how to manage/budget money, and that it doesn't grow on trees. Again - why do I feel I'm being punished? I didn't do anything? :lol:

Oh well. I told my daughter "Welcome to the wonderful world of adulthood where insanity rules!" :lol:

I know Representative Tony Core very well. They live near me, and his daughter and mine go to school together, and are good friends. I am going to send that letter too.

LoganBuck
04-13-2008, 10:09 PM
Tony is a good guy isn't he? I ate lunch with him a few years ago, and he was so cool.

Caveat Emperor
04-13-2008, 11:53 PM
BUT... and the judge told everyone this prior to court. If your child is on a restricted license, meaning being under 17, the state mandates that they will have to be accompanied by a parent/guardian at all times whenever operating a vehicle until they reach 17. They can receive no driving privileges, such as for work or school.

Wow.

That's a completely a different reading of the law than I've seen down here.

If I get a free moment tomorrow, I'm going to call the BMV to clarify the statutory interpretation that they use. Since they hand out the suspensions, they'll know the full story on this.

flyer85
04-14-2008, 09:31 AM
Filing a police report and issuing a citation is a criminal proceeding and may have little or no impact on the civil proceedings.

In this case the only thing filing the report did was get your daughter hauled into juvenile court and enrich the coffers of the local jurisdiction.

GAC
04-14-2008, 08:09 PM
Wow.

That's a completely a different reading of the law than I've seen down here.

If I get a free moment tomorrow, I'm going to call the BMV to clarify the statutory interpretation that they use. Since they hand out the suspensions, they'll know the full story on this.

Thanks CE. I appreciate that.

GAC
04-14-2008, 08:22 PM
In this case the only thing filing the report did was get your daughter hauled into juvenile court and enrich the coffers of the local jurisdiction.

I'm not going to fault that other girl's mother for wanting a police report. Her daughter had other passengers in the car. If one of them claimed injury, then she would want a police report. She has to protect herself. I don't know this mother, or have ever met her; but I don't think her end intent was to see that my daughter got hauled into court.

I've told my daughter to chalk it up as a "life lesson". It may not seem fair or right, as far as the results received, but that's life sometimes. It's not the end of the world. Take it, learn from it, and grow. Don't be bitter.

Degenerate39
04-14-2008, 11:00 PM
I got my license a few months ago so whenever I get a car I'll keep this excuse under my hat. Hopefully I won't need to use it though.