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jmac
03-27-2008, 11:44 PM
Okay, I do not like starting threads. First one in fact.
Here is my problem. We live outside city limits and have a problem with a neighbor who has a dog which has got loose on several occassions lately. The dog is a pitbull or part pitbull and when loose has cornered a neighbor on two different occassions.
They have been warned repeatedly about keeping this dog chained but he continously gets loose.
I have a little girl and I have stated I dont plan on her being scared all summer to go outside.
My question is what can I legally do ?
If I go to the authorities, can they do something or what is the best action to take?
I would appreciate genuine advice from any Redzoners.

WMR
03-27-2008, 11:47 PM
Wow that is scary, rocko. If it were me, I'd call the sheriff's department, tell them about the situation, and tell them that if the dog "threatens" you, you'll shoot it. Tell the neighbors the same thing. Next time the dog gets out, kill it. That's harsh, I know, but it's not worth risking your little girl's life.

The owner's will either take care of the problem or you'll take care of it for them.

The police can't really do anything proactive, but if you call ahead about your worries and what you're planning on doing, you will have your concerns on record. You do not have to be scared in your own neighborhood of a rogue, dangerous animal.

919191
03-27-2008, 11:53 PM
I actually agree with Willy. If you feel threatened by an animal on your property, and ca n do away with it without putting others (people or pets) in jeopardy, you may want to do it. Warn the neighbor first and see what happens. I'm not some kind of redneck or neanderthal who thinks this is a normal way of solving problems, but if I was concerned about me family's safety I wouldn't think twice about it.

Use a shotgun.

George Foster
03-28-2008, 01:14 AM
You tell the owner, "if the dog is in my yard again I will put a hole it it's head"

You don't take a chance on your daughter getting killed or permenently disfugured. NO CHANCE.

Don't worry about the law, do the right thing. No jury is going to convict you for killing a pit bull in your yard.

Who cares if they do, your daughter is safer. You must protect your daughter, period. Nice guys end up with dead or disfigured children.

The exact same thing happen to me 4 years ago. A neighbor had a pit bull that was chained in the back yard with one of those screw in the ground chains. It rained about 2 inches one day and the dog pulled the chain out of the mud. He was running around the neighborhood draging the chain and almost attacked my next door neighbor, he fought off the dog with a lawn chair.

That night me and him went to the dog owners house. I had my pistol visable in my pants. I told him If his dog was ever in my yard, I was not going to call anybody...I was just going to kill it.

I also told him if the dog ever attacked my daughter it would be the worse day in his life. ( I let his imagination wonder!) My neighbor pretty much said the samething.

The guy got rid of the dog within the week.

Protect your family....no one else will.

Ltlabner
03-28-2008, 06:34 AM
Or instead of going all rambo you could simply call your county government and see if there is a "animal control agency". Make sure they understand how threatening the dog has been and request that they come pick up the dog right away. Be insistant and make sure they respond yesterday.

They can most safely capture the animal, determine if it is unsafe, and if neccessary humanely put the animal down. Also, many communities have viscious or nuiscence dog laws so the owers will be cited as well.

Do not kill the dog unless it is activley attacking someone. If you do shoot it while it is mearly taking a dump in your yard or sniffing your flowers you will be convicted for negligent discharge of a firearm, possibly have your firearm confiscated and will likely open yourself up to a civil suit.

If it's got someone cornered or is attacking someone I wouldn't have a moments hesitation to shoot the animal. However, just taking things into your own hands and being the neighborhood enforcer is a bad, bad idea.

Ltlabner
03-28-2008, 06:42 AM
That night me and him went to the dog owners house. I had my pistol visable in my pants. I told him If his dog was ever in my yard, I was not going to call anybody...I was just going to kill it.

You do realize you committed a crime there right? Check out "brandishing a firearm".

This is peanut gallery stuff, but it's those sorts of bonehead moves that cause responsible gun owners so many headaches.

rotnoid
03-28-2008, 07:20 AM
Or instead of going all rambo you could simply call your county government and see if there is a "animal control agency". Make sure they understand how threatening the dog has been and request that they come pick up the dog right away. Be insistant and make sure they respond yesterday.

They can most safely capture the animal, determine if it is unsafe, and if neccessary humanely put the animal down. Also, many communities have viscious or nuiscence dog laws so the owers will be cited as well.

Do not kill the dog unless it is activley attacking someone. If you do shoot it while it is mearly taking a dump in your yard or sniffing your flowers you will be convicted for negligent discharge of a firearm, possibly have your firearm confiscated and will likely open yourself up to a civil suit.

If it's got someone cornered or is attacking someone I wouldn't have a moments hesitation to shoot the animal. However, just taking things into your own hands and being the neighborhood enforcer is a bad, bad idea.


Well said.

Be forceful. Let them know that you're that you're not going away. Keep causing a stir until something is done, it's your right to complain. The kind of vigilante non-sense advocated elsewhere is the kind of stuff that makes the news and sheds a bad light on gun owners in general. (I'll stop now, that line's getting very close).

That being said, if you or your family ever are in danger though, take it out.

cumberlandreds
03-28-2008, 08:38 AM
The next time the dog comes around,be nice to it. Offer it a nice cool bowl of some sweet anti-freeze. It's much cleaner than a gun.

Actually,I'm just kidding. Call the your local animal warden. I'm sure nearly every county in the country has one of those. Also call the sherriff's department and make a complaint and ask them to go by to talk to your neighbors. At the every least you will have a record of what's happening in case you do have to resort to more forceful means.

Red in Chicago
03-28-2008, 08:45 AM
That night me and him went to the dog owners house. I had my pistol visable in my pants. I told him If his dog was ever in my yard, I was not going to call anybody...I was just going to kill it.


So it's ok for you to go onto his property showing a gun for an incident that didn't even happen to you? If some nosy neighbor comes up to my door with a gun, they will be leaving my property very sorry. Go ahead, make my day ;)

bucksfan
03-28-2008, 09:21 AM
I strongly advocate calling the animal control officer, and as rotnoid has said, be forceful and persistent. It would not hurt to call sheriff as well. This is obviously nothing that should be taken lightly and it needs to be addressed now. The next time that dog is loose (if there is a next time) needs to be the last time. I am a dog owner and dog lover and I have nothing but disdain for irresponsible dog owners, ranging from those who do not pick up for their dogs to those who do not control them. No matter what the neighbor may say (I believe I understand you have talked with him first), this is no trivial matter and not something that can keep happening, regardless of how nice he may claim the dog to be.

We live out in the country, with no neighbors within 1000 linear yards. Fortunately this removes me from many (but not all) of the concerns about neighbors' dogs trespassing. However we will occasionally get a stray, which when that happens is even a little more disconcerting as we have no idea or knowledge of the animal. One time it was a pitbull and it was not cool at all. The animal was obviously not well. In this case, since it was a pitbull, the sheriff dept was willing to take care of it and they had it off my property within the hour.

Do not rest until that dog is in a secured fenced in area or is removed from that owner. And certainly be ready to protect your family when outside until the threat is gone. Just so it is clear, I am not saying this just because it is a pitbull, I would say the same thing for any larger dog that could certainly cause harm to any person. I cannot imagine that person will continue to own this dog very long.

Best of luck getting this resolved quickly.

BRM
03-28-2008, 09:28 AM
Ltlabner with the voice of reason...who woulda thunk it? ;)

Calling animal control is definitely step one. Give them a chance to handle it first. If that fails, then I'd have no problems shooting the dog if it was on my property threatening anyone in my family. But give the animal control folks a chance to resolve it peacefully first.

westofyou
03-28-2008, 10:17 AM
I had my pistol visable in my pants.

That's two gun incidents eh George... the guy in the road and your neighbor.

Charming approach you have there.

redsfanmia
03-28-2008, 02:59 PM
That's two gun incidents eh George... the guy in the road and your neighbor.

Charming approach you have there.

I thought the same thing you just beat me to it.

GoReds33
03-28-2008, 03:34 PM
I would go with something a little less deadly than a shotgun. BB guns are very quiet, and they give the dog a good reminder to stay off your property. Lots of firecrackers can do the same thing.

The only way I would shoot the dog would be if it was loose, and your daughter is outside. Of course, not if the dog is even remotely close to your daughter though.

MWM
03-28-2008, 03:36 PM
The ironic thing about all the "get your gun" responses is that if he takes a gun onto a neighbors property he might just get shot himself by someone wondering why someone is onhis property with a gun.

919191
03-28-2008, 03:56 PM
I think only anidiot would venture onto another's property to shoot their dog, or to show off what they're packing in their pants.

On my property, however...but only if i think the animal is a hazard.

OldRightHander
03-28-2008, 03:57 PM
I had my pistol visable in my pants.

Today's out of context winner?

Falls City Beer
03-28-2008, 03:57 PM
Nah, I'd go all Rambo. It LOOKS awesome.

LoganBuck
03-28-2008, 04:00 PM
I live far enough away from anyone else, that the dog would just disappear, without a word ever being spoken. If it gets loose that often it may just runaway...........to a shallow grave.

Dog wardens can be ultra serious or ultra lame. So be prepared, also if this retard has a pitbull that he allows to run loose, my guess is he has a limited respect for the law.

BRM
03-28-2008, 04:08 PM
George is the only one who mentioned carrying a gun onto the neighbor's property. Not everyone who mentioned a gun in this thread was going "Rambo".

dabvu2498
03-28-2008, 04:13 PM
George is the only one who mentioned carrying a gun onto the neighbor's property. Not everyone who mentioned a gun in this thread was going "Rambo".

But that is the best idea here, isn't it???

BRM
03-28-2008, 04:14 PM
But that is the best idea here, isn't it???

Carrying a gun onto the neighbor's property? I would think not. Shooting an aggressive or attacking dog when it's on your property? Certainly.

dabvu2498
03-28-2008, 04:15 PM
Carrying a gun onto the neighbor's property? I would think not. Shooting an aggressive or attacking dog when it's on your property? Certainly.

I meant "going Rambo."

That's what I'd do on a daily basis. Dogs or no dogs. :D

BRM
03-28-2008, 04:16 PM
I meant "going Rambo."

That's what I'd do on a daily basis. Dogs or no dogs. :D

Gotcha. Going Rambo every morning will keep the blood pressure down from what I hear. It's a good stress reliever.

Spring~Fields
03-28-2008, 04:16 PM
Okay, I do not like starting threads. First one in fact.
Here is my problem. We live outside city limits and have a problem with a neighbor who has a dog which has got loose on several occassions lately. The dog is a pitbull or part pitbull and when loose has cornered a neighbor on two different occassions.
They have been warned repeatedly about keeping this dog chained but he continously gets loose.
I have a little girl and I have stated I dont plan on her being scared all summer to go outside.
My question is what can I legally do ?
If I go to the authorities, can they do something or what is the best action to take?
I would appreciate genuine advice from any Redzoners.

Play it by the book first. Call your law enforcement and animal control repeatedly, get some digital photos with dates/time if possible, showing the dog running lose, the photos make it easier for law enforcement and animal control, cover your butt first. Explain the threats, then do what you have to do.

If you have a slick lying neighbor like I do, the police will come out each time, but the pit bull will be back in the house by the time they get there with the owner saying that it wasn't their dog and that their dog has been in the house the entire time, same way when the animal control comes out. Thus you will need some objective proof.

Yachtzee
03-28-2008, 04:18 PM
Gotcha. Going Rambo every morning will keep the blood pressure down from what I hear. It's a good stress reliever.

Is that what the kids are calling it these days?

dabvu2498
03-28-2008, 04:19 PM
Gotcha. Going Rambo every morning will keep the blood pressure down from what I hear. It's a good stress reliever.

Wearing ammo strapped across your chest when doing chores is good cardio as well.

Chip R
03-28-2008, 04:50 PM
I meant "going Rambo."

That's what I'd do on a daily basis. Dogs or no dogs. :D


Going "Rambo" or Commando? :eek:

George Foster
03-28-2008, 09:37 PM
You do realize you committed a crime there right? Check out "brandishing a firearm".

This is peanut gallery stuff, but it's those sorts of bonehead moves that cause responsible gun owners so many headaches.

Not it my state, the firearm was visable, and I have a permit, you need to learn the law. The saftey of my children comes first, I make no apology for that ever. I will not allow someone else's irresponsible behavior put my children in danger. I will be proactive, always. My children will never be in danger of someone else or someone else's dog in their own yard. If you do not feel the same way I feel sorry for your kids, if you have any.

You can also shot any dog in your yard that is not on a leach in my county. Guess what...that law does a good job in keeping other people's dog's out of your yard.

Raisor
03-28-2008, 09:49 PM
Wearing ammo strapped across your chest when doing chores is good cardio as well.


I find that they pinch my chest hairs.

ouch

WMR
03-28-2008, 09:54 PM
I wrote a paper in my Animal Law class on leash laws and pitbull attack numbers were a significant aspect of my work. The percentage of pitbull attacks on children that end up being fatal are staggeringly high. After I call the sheriff and tell the neighbor to keep their dangerous animal secured, I would be totally within my rights to kill the animal if it came on my property. Anyone who wouldn't do such a thing is the irresponsible one, IMO.

jmac
03-28-2008, 09:54 PM
Thanks everyone for your insight !

WMR
03-28-2008, 10:06 PM
Or instead of going all rambo you could simply call your county government and see if there is a "animal control agency". Make sure they understand how threatening the dog has been and request that they come pick up the dog right away. Be insistant and make sure they respond yesterday.

They can most safely capture the animal, determine if it is unsafe, and if neccessary humanely put the animal down. Also, many communities have viscious or nuiscence dog laws so the owers will be cited as well.

Do not kill the dog unless it is activley attacking someone. If you do shoot it while it is mearly taking a dump in your yard or sniffing your flowers you will be convicted for negligent discharge of a firearm, possibly have your firearm confiscated and will likely open yourself up to a civil suit.

If it's got someone cornered or is attacking someone I wouldn't have a moments hesitation to shoot the animal. However, just taking things into your own hands and being the neighborhood enforcer is a bad, bad idea.

If a pitbull is on your property you had better not wait until it is actively mauling your little girl or your little girl will likely be dead.

Pitbulls are bred for aggressiveness and the ability to kill.

We're not talking about a toy poodle here.

Razor Shines
03-28-2008, 10:15 PM
Wearing ammo strapped across your chest when doing chores is good cardio as well.

Happiness is a belt fed weapon.:)

Razor Shines
03-28-2008, 10:17 PM
If a pitbull is on your property you had better not wait until it is actively mauling your little girl or your little girl will likely be dead.

Pitbulls are bred for aggressiveness and the ability to kill.

We're not talking about a toy poodle here.

I agree. I know a guy who had to beat his pit bull to death to get it to stop mauling a neighbour's dog. And he got another one.:rolleyes: Owning a pit bull is dumb, IM-not so-HO.

15fan
03-28-2008, 10:55 PM
Call animal control and the authorities.

Had an incident a few months ago where my wife & 4 year old took a walk to a park. Yippee little dog that barks incessantly down at the end of the street saw us coming, ran through the electric fence, and bit Mrs. fan while we were on the sidewalk. Owner was nowhere in sight.

Got the dog off my wife, then stormed to the front door. Told the owners that if they have a dog, they have a responsibility to either keep it inside, or properly secured and supervised outside. Then I let her know how lucky she was that it chose to bite my wife and not my 4 year old. Or any other kid in the neighborhood. It would have gotten all kinds of nasty at that point.

As it was, the dog was quarantined for 10 days by the county. Haven't seen it or heard it since.

If you have a little kid and the neighbor has a pitbull, the time to act is yesterday. My guess is that your neighbors will gladly join the cause.

cincinnati chili
03-29-2008, 12:27 AM
I agree. I know a guy who had to beat his pit bull to death to get it to stop mauling a neighbour's dog. And he got another one.:rolleyes: Owning a pit bull is dumb, IM-not so-HO.

Ahhh. I wouldn't go that far. It Probably had something to do with the owner.

Pit bulls are illegal in Denver, so they get confiscated and sent up to the Boulder shelter. A large portion (half?) of the dogs in the Boulder shelter are pit bulls or pit-mixes. For the most part, the pit bull owners in Boulder are responsible and even-tempered and (big surprise) so are their dogs.

In metro-Boston, such was not the case. A lot of times, the bullethead gangbangers were drawn to pit bull ownership. It wasn't uncommon for the MS-13-wannabes in my 'hood to brandish their pit bulls in a menacing way.

OTOH, if you are an experienced dog owner WITHOUT small children, a lot of time to train your dog, a lot of time to spend with your dog, then they can be extremely loyal and loving pets. The non-pit below is my dog. The pit is his former girlfriend back in Boston, who he misses terribly. As you can see from the Marv Albert impersonation, he's into the kinky rough stuff.

TeamCasey
03-29-2008, 07:56 AM
Those of you waving guns around the neighborhood ready to shoot the dog ........ what happens when you miss and shoot a child? Please don't tell me that it couldn't possibly happen. It can and does.

Quite frankly, I find you more dangerous than the loose dog.

Call the authorities - animal control and sheriff.

919191
03-29-2008, 09:08 AM
Those of you waving guns around the neighborhood ready to shoot the dog ........ what happens when you miss and shoot a child? Please don't tell me that it couldn't possibly happen. It can and does.

Quite frankly, I find you more dangerous than the loose dog.

Call the authorities - animal control and sheriff.

I don't know about all cities, but here it is impossible to get anything done. I have made that call several times. I get the animal control department, and all you can do is leave a message with whoever answers the phone. Maybe an hour later the officer drives by. Wonder where that dog is now?

Couple of years ago there was a medium sized mutt loose around here. It was left by someone who moved away, I think. I would step outside and it would approach me growling pretty aggressively. My kids were afraid to go outsisde. I called the police several times. Once he even darted it, but it escaped and he couldn't find him. Finally, it seemed to disappear (not by anything I did).

In this case what other alternatives exist? I mean, if it did not disappear? Make my kids stay inside all summer waiting for the police to take care of something they didn't seem to care about?


I don't advocate killing every dog that runs through my yard- that doesn't bother me. I don't own a gun. Probably 99% of the strays I see are friendly, and probably most are loose accidentily. Occaisionally there is a problem.


If one of my kids had to go to the hospital after a mauling and it was an animal that had presented a threat previously, would I not be remiss in my responsibilities as a a parent by not averting a danger that I knew existed, but chose to wait in hopes of the city taking care of it?

Is that a run-on sentence?


And if I had to deal with this problem by killing a dog, it isn't like I would enjoy it. I would view it as something I unfortunately had to do. It would probably bother me.

Yachtzee
03-29-2008, 10:46 AM
Some dog owners give the rest of us a bad name.

I have a neighbor who has had a number of dogs he's failed to properly control. The first was a little yippie dog that was cute, but always loose. Mom and dad would never chase after it, so it was always up to the kids and their friends to go after it. These kids and their friends were pretty young, certainly too young to be chasing a dog through neighborhood streets unsupervised. One night my wife and I were coming home from a night out and saw the dog in the street in front of our house. I drove right up to it before turning into my driveway and said, "That dog is going to get hit." Sure enough, right as I park in the garage and get out of the car, another car comes by and hits it. Poor thing makes it into a neighbor's yard and starts yelping. I run to catch the dog and comfort it while my wife runs down the street to get the owners. When she got there, it was clear the kids heard what happened, as they were standing there with looks of shock on their faces. Meanwhile, dad is completely uninterested. She had to tell him his dog was still alive so that he would come get it. The next day, his wife comes by and starts asking me questions in an accusatory tone. Hey, I caught your dog and tried to keep it calm, lady. I heard months later that they never took the dog to the vet and let it die a slow death in their garage.

They then got two dobermans. The dobermans were left outside all the time and barked incessantly. When they got a divorce and the wife moved out (she always acted like a 30 yr old teenager), the dogs were left outside until animal control came by and told him to get rid of the dogs or face charges.

Now the dude has a new girlfriend moving in and two new dogs, one for her kids and one for his. This new dog for his kids is smaller like the first dog, but once again he lets it roam free through the neighborhood, leaving the kids to chase it. It's always in the street and I'm ticked off because I don't want to be the one who has to take care of it when it gets hit and I certainly don't want my two young boys traumatized if they witness it.

bucksfan
03-29-2008, 10:57 AM
It was something I had to do, believe it or not, with a stray cat. The thing was like a miniature bobcat or something, obviously not a pet, and it beat the crap out of one of ours (to the tune of a few hundred dollars vet bill). I did not feel good about it at all, but something I had to do. Our officials will respond well to dog issues, but I would not expect them to do the same for cats. I have also see a coyote or 2 on our property but thankfully not often and our cats have made it 9 + years on guts, instincts, and undoubtedly some luck.

I know not all pitbulls are mean. However history shows many are. THe likelihood increases with the fact that the owner does not keep his confined properly, (i.e. irresponsibility). You seriously cannot run any sort of risk with your daughter or yourself. By all means follow the normal channels but if they cannot resolve asap once you show a photo of it on your property or something (great idea by the way!), you need to do what you can to reasonably protect your family. If you are not familiar or comfortable with a gun, by all means don't start now. But possibly find a friend who is. Of course all this depends on where you live also. I am far from where I can harm anyone. If I was in town I would not be comfortable with such an undertaking due to safety concerns.

Falls City Beer
03-29-2008, 12:11 PM
I don't know about all cities, but here it is impossible to get anything done. I have made that call several times. I get the animal control department, and all you can do is leave a message with whoever answers the phone. Maybe an hour later the officer drives by. Wonder where that dog is now?

Couple of years ago there was a medium sized mutt loose around here. It was left by someone who moved away, I think. I would step outside and it would approach me growling pretty aggressively. My kids were afraid to go outsisde. I called the police several times. Once he even darted it, but it escaped and he couldn't find him. Finally, it seemed to disappear (not by anything I did).

In this case what other alternatives exist? I mean, if it did not disappear? Make my kids stay inside all summer waiting for the police to take care of something they didn't seem to care about?


I don't advocate killing every dog that runs through my yard- that doesn't bother me. I don't own a gun. Probably 99% of the strays I see are friendly, and probably most are loose accidentily. Occaisionally there is a problem.


If one of my kids had to go to the hospital after a mauling and it was an animal that had presented a threat previously, would I not be remiss in my responsibilities as a a parent by not averting a danger that I knew existed, but chose to wait in hopes of the city taking care of it?

Is that a run-on sentence?


And if I had to deal with this problem by killing a dog, it isn't like I would enjoy it. I would view it as something I unfortunately had to do. It would probably bother me.

Write your congressman. No, I'm not being a smart ass. Go to the press. Say something about it to someone higher up. Yeah, it's more work--but it's for the general good.

Look, in extreme circumstances, you got to do what you got to do; but see to it that the bureau in your community gets a reaming for not doing their job.

TeamCasey
03-29-2008, 12:11 PM
Yeah, we used to have a problem with our neighbor's cats fighting with ours. One was particularly insane and attacked me while I was out raking leaves.

I went out and banged pots and pans everytime they entered our yard. Eventually they learned the boundaries and stayed clear.

It was comical. I'd walk out of the house and calmly say ..... "Hi, Dandy or Hi *insert forgotten cat name*"

They'd run away as fast as they could.


We also have a beautiful chocolate lab that roams free in our neighborhood. He's friendly enough and I've made a point to see how he behaves around TeamGriffey and other children. I think he's safe enough but it's still troubling how the owners let him roam. I usually take him by the collar and bring him home or chase him off.

My next door neighbor has 5 dogs and you'd never know it. They are so well behaved and well cared for. I offer to babysit when they go away. They're a pleasure to be with.

The house next door to them has 4 dogs and 3 of them live in the backyard like livestock. It makes me sick. The little dog that lives in the house is so overfed, it waddles. I think the guy loves the dogs but simply doesn't know how to care for them.

redsfanmia
03-29-2008, 12:30 PM
Happiness is a belt fed weapon.:)

I thought Happiness is a warm gun.

WMR
03-29-2008, 12:50 PM
It was something I had to do, believe it or not, with a stray cat. The thing was like a miniature bobcat or something, obviously not a pet, and it beat the crap out of one of ours (to the tune of a few hundred dollars vet bill). I did not feel good about it at all, but something I had to do. Our officials will respond well to dog issues, but I would not expect them to do the same for cats. I have also see a coyote or 2 on our property but thankfully not often and our cats have made it 9 + years on guts, instincts, and undoubtedly some luck.

I know not all pitbulls are mean. However history shows many are. THe likelihood increases with the fact that the owner does not keep his confined properly, (i.e. irresponsibility). You seriously cannot run any sort of risk with your daughter or yourself. By all means follow the normal channels but if they cannot resolve asap once you show a photo of it on your property or something (great idea by the way!), you need to do what you can to reasonably protect your family. If you are not familiar or comfortable with a gun, by all means don't start now. But possibly find a friend who is. Of course all this depends on where you live also. I am far from where I can harm anyone. If I was in town I would not be comfortable with such an undertaking due to safety concerns.

:lol: :laugh: :lol: :laugh: :lol:

That's hilarious!

WMR
03-29-2008, 12:54 PM
Those of you waving guns around the neighborhood ready to shoot the dog ........ what happens when you miss and shoot a child? Please don't tell me that it couldn't possibly happen. It can and does.

Quite frankly, I find you more dangerous than the loose dog.

Call the authorities - animal control and sheriff.

I've been responsibly using guns my entire life. If I fire my shotgun with the intent to kill a dog, you can damn sure bet that it will be done in a way that ENSURES the safety of everyone else.

There's a reason why 200 men can congregate on the same field and go dove hunting without anyone getting shot.

GoReds33
03-29-2008, 01:02 PM
There's a reason why 200 men can congregate on the same field and go dove hunting without anyone getting shot.Unless one of those men is Dick Cheney.:D

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

WMR
03-29-2008, 01:15 PM
Unless one of those men is Dick Cheney.:D

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

:lol: :lol: :lol:

TRUE!!!

LoganBuck
03-29-2008, 03:25 PM
TeamCasey, if you are going to shoot a gun, you had better darn well be sure that you hit what you are aiming at. Wildly aiming guns is not something that responsible people do. Call the authorities, but my family will not be terrorized or harmed by some idiot's vicious dog.

Ltlabner
03-29-2008, 05:57 PM
Ltlabner with the voice of reason...who woulda thunk it? ;) .

Crazy aint it? I my meds are working great today. :)


Not it my state, the firearm was visable, and I have a permit, you need to learn the law. If you do not feel the same way I feel sorry for your kids, if you have any.

If you don't understand the difference between open carry and brandishing then I'd suggest you are the one who needs to crack the law books a bit.

If you read my original post I said I'd drop a dog that was threatening my family in a heartbeat. But shoot any ole dog that wanders into my yard? No, I think most folks with brains realize what a bad idea that is.

Ltlabner
03-29-2008, 06:06 PM
If a pitbull is on your property you had better not wait until it is actively mauling your little girl or your little girl will likely be dead.

Pitbulls are bred for aggressiveness and the ability to kill.

So were Rotwilers. Do you shoot them without cause also?

Cesar Milan has many pits in his pack. Do you just plunk them too?

I don't think it makes a lot of sense to shoot a dog on your property just because it's there, Wily. There's a lot of other more reasonable and safe steps to take before running for the shotty. Besides a lot of people can't even properly identify a pit, let alone make a determiniation if it's agressive. And if it's a mut that appears to be a pit? What then? Or it is a pit, but has been in a family with kids for 9 years and never once shown a sign of agressiveness? You really want to carry a dead dog carcas back to little Timmy down the street and say "opps"?

I agree pits can be dangerous, and are more likely to be dangerous. But ANY stray dog comes in my yard, the kids are in the house or seperated by a fence right now. My wife or I go out and make a determination as to whether its a neighborhood dog who escaped, a stray or possibly sick/threatening and respond appropriatley. And there's a bunch of steps in between pull the kids inside to chambering a round into the Wingmaster.

BTW, totally agree on using a deer slug. Cops have empted entire Glock 17 mags into attacking pits (that's 17rounds of 9mm jacketed hollowpoints) without killing the animal or stopping the attack.

TeamSelig
03-29-2008, 07:48 PM
Crazy aint it? I my meds are working great today. :)



If you don't understand the difference between open carry and brandishing then I'd suggest you are the one who needs to crack the law books a bit.




He doesn't have them mixed up, there is simply no brandishing law in the state of PA.

George Foster
03-30-2008, 02:30 AM
Crazy aint it? I my meds are working great today. :)



If you don't understand the difference between open carry and brandishing then I'd suggest you are the one who needs to crack the law books a bit.

If you read my original post I said I'd drop a dog that was threatening my family in a heartbeat. But shoot any ole dog that wanders into my yard? No, I think most folks with brains realize what a bad idea that is.

Your comparing apples and oranges. IF YOU READ my origional post this dog already tried to attack my neighbor and he had to fight it off with a lawn chair. This was not some old lab, your making stuff up to justify your argument.

Having a gun visible in your pants, is not concealed and is not brandishing, were do you come from? This definiton should help educate you.



Brandish \Bran"dish\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Brandished; p. pr. & vb. n. Brandishing.]

[OE. braundisen, F. brandir, fr. brand a sword, fr. OHG. brant brand. See Brand, n.]

1. To move or wave, as a weapon; to raise and move in various directions; to shake or flourish.

The quivering lance which he brandished bright. --Drake.

2. To play with; to flourish; as, to brandish syllogisms.

Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

757690
03-30-2008, 03:51 AM
My ex-girlfriend worked for the city in animal control. Let me dispel a few myths and mis-conceptions that have been stated on this post.


1) A pitt bull which is properly raised will be as gentle, loving and loyal as a lab, poodle, cocker spaniel, or any other dog. The problem with pitt bulls is that if they do attack, they have a lock jaw, which is capable of killing a person. This is why dog fighters use, and train them. Just a few decades ago, Pitt bulls were actually considered the safest dogs to be with children, and nicknamed the "Nanny" dog. It was only when they started being used and bred for dog fighting did they get the reputation they have now.

2) There is a huge difference between a pitt bull and a pitt bull mix. There are almost no pitt bull mixes that are dangerous. Nearly all pitt bull mixes would not have the lock jaw, so they would not be capable of killing a human. Also, mixes are almost by definition better tempered than pure breds of any kind. (Being inbred would make anyone meaner, and less stable) Of course it all depends on what it is mixed with. Still, virtually no one would train the pitt bull mix to be aggressive, since it would not make a good fighter. The weakest pure bred pitt bull will destroy nearly any pitt bull mix.

3) Nearly any dog, away from its home, will be aggressive towards strangers. In her job, my ex girlfriend has been cornered by golden retrievers, labs, and even small "Paris Hilton" dogs. Dogs away from home are very scared, and their instinct is to defend themselves so they get very defensive. So, Rocko, the behavior you see in your neighbor's dog is very common and does not mean that it will attack humans. The fact that it has cornered humans and not attacked them suggests that he will not attack unless he is attacked.


Still, because anything can happen, stay away from any stray dogs, and make sure to keep all children away from all stray dogs. You are very justified in being worried, and your neighbor must be taught to keep his dog secure at all times. Simply report him to the police. The city will have no problem taking away a dog from a owner who can't keep it secure. That is the first rule of owning a dog. You must keep it secure and safe. If you can back up that this has happened more than once, there is a good chance the city will take the dog away, at least until it can be sure that the owner has taken proper measures to keep the dog secure. The city has zero tolerance for owners like your neighbor.

That is a very scary situation, good luck.

Ltlabner
03-30-2008, 07:55 AM
Having a gun visible in your pants, is not concealed and is not brandishing, were do you come from?

You should have looked at more than one website. Had you done so, you would have quickly seen the error of your ways. I'll assume you didn't omit these web entries since they didn't happen to support your position and simply overlooked them....(by the way, they were all located on the first page of my websearch).

(1) bran·dish (brndsh)
tr.v. bran·dished, bran·dish·ing, bran·dish·es
1. To wave or flourish (a weapon, for example) menacingly.
2. To display ostentatiously. See Synonyms at flourish.

From here (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Brandishing)

(2) Verb: brandish brandish
Move or swing back and forth
- flourish, wave

Exhibit aggressively

From here (http://www.wordwebonline.com/en/BRANDISH)

(3) brandish Definition bran·dish (bran′dis̸h)

transitive verb

to wave, shake, or exhibit in a menacing, challenging, or exultant way; flourish

From here (http://www.yourdictionary.com/brandish)

(4) Main Entry: 1bran·dish
Pronunciation: \ˈbran-dish\
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English braundisshen, from Anglo-French brandiss-, stem of brandir, from brant, braund sword, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English brand
Date: 14th century
1 : to shake or wave (as a weapon) menacingly
2 : to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive manner

From here (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brandishing)

No, I'm not a lawer, but I am someone who is passionate about common sense with firearms. You see, I don't want your dumb decisions like yours to jeprodize my rights. And having a gun tucked into your pants to add extra weight to giving your neighbor what-for over a dog qualifies squarely as D-U-M-B. I'm currious, what reason did you have for having that gun showing? Was it an accident? Was it because you feared the ower would attack you? No, you did that on purpose to help make your point with more gusto.

Your EXACT words were...


That night me and him went to the dog owners house. I had my pistol visable in my pants. I told him If his dog was ever in my yard, I was not going to call anybody...I was just going to kill it.

I also told him if the dog ever attacked my daughter it would be the worse day in his life. ( I let his imagination wonder!) My neighbor pretty much said the samething.


Yea, I'd say that qualifies as brandishing, or at least there'd be enough grounds for an officer to haul you in. Unless, of course, you are exagerating the nature of the exhange for some internet bravado.

By the way, while I'm no lawer, I found this little nugget in another quick websearch. "The court of appeals has cited the following examples of conduct constituting wanton endagerment: dishcarging or brandishing a firearm in public...." From here (http://162.114.92.72/COA/2007-CA-000366.pdf) Thats from a Kentucky court of appeals ruling. No, it's not a statute but I'd say that gives us a good hint as to the legal standing of brandishing in your state.

Beyond a legal definition (and I'd certinally welcome a Kentucky police officer or laywers opinion on this) a common sense view of what you did is that it clearly was a bad, bad, bad choice. I woln't go into all the reasons, but if you can't see that using a firearm as a little extra intimidation is poor judgement, then you are unsafe to use and own firearms. Period. I certinally wouldn't want to be next to you at the range or near you while hunting.

Since you clearly are confused over what brandishing means, I'm sure you'll fight this next nugget tooth-and-nail, but had that exchange of words escelated and you ultimatley shot him YOU would very likely have no legal leg to stand on and would be charged with some form of murder. YOU started the confrentation by walking over there, YOU escleated it by brandishing a weapon and YOU further esclated it by dropping threats (see bolded part of your quote). And based on your charming responces on this thread, I don't think it's unreasonable to assume you would have kept upping the ante in my hypothetical.

Sorry bud, I'm sure I'll get a lengthy and charming responce, but you chose very poorly by tucking the weapon in your wasteband and equally bad judgement to brag about it on an internet forum.

Ltlabner
03-30-2008, 08:01 AM
IF YOU READ my origional post this dog already tried to attack my neighbor and he had to fight it off with a lawn chair. This was not some old lab, your making stuff up to justify your argument.

Once again, your exact words in a subsequent post...


My children will never be in danger of someone else or someone else's dog in their own yard. If you do not feel the same way I feel sorry for your kids, if you have any.

You can also shot any dog in your yard that is not on a leach in my county. Guess what...that law does a good job in keeping other people's dog's out of your yard.

See the bolded parts. You are clearly talking about shooting ANY dog that walks into your yard, and have moved beyond just shooting your neighbors dog.

Further, since I've posted several times that I'd shoot a threatening dog (or any other animal) without a moments hesitation, I'm clearly not talking just about your neighbors dog and have broadened the topic to ANY dog.

So yea, my comments about you drilling any ole dog that wanders in your yard were dead on the mark.

Red in Chicago
03-30-2008, 08:41 AM
The annoying part is that the dog threatened one of his other neighbors, not him. Yet, he feels the need to go onto the dog owners property and try to intimidate the owner. Let the police do their job. Stop trying to be Charles Bronson:rolleyes:

RFS62
03-30-2008, 10:33 AM
Lot of brandishing going on in here.

westofyou
03-30-2008, 10:38 AM
Lot of brandishing going on in here.

Yeah but the real thing being swung around in big man town when brandishing is the phallus.

The Greeks would make a great play out of aforementioned scenario.

MWM
03-30-2008, 11:09 AM
My ex-girlfriend worked for the city in animal control. Let me dispel a few myths and mis-conceptions that have been stated on this post.


1) A pitt bull which is properly raised will be as gentle, loving and loyal as a lab, poodle, cocker spaniel, or any other dog. The problem with pitt bulls is that if they do attack, they have a lock jaw, which is capable of killing a person. This is why dog fighters use, and train them. Just a few decades ago, Pitt bulls were actually considered the safest dogs to be with children, and nicknamed the "Nanny" dog. It was only when they started being used and bred for dog fighting did they get the reputation they have now.

2) There is a huge difference between a pitt bull and a pitt bull mix. There are almost no pitt bull mixes that are dangerous. Nearly all pitt bull mixes would not have the lock jaw, so they would not be capable of killing a human. Also, mixes are almost by definition better tempered than pure breds of any kind. (Being inbred would make anyone meaner, and less stable) Of course it all depends on what it is mixed with. Still, virtually no one would train the pitt bull mix to be aggressive, since it would not make a good fighter. The weakest pure bred pitt bull will destroy nearly any pitt bull mix.

3) Nearly any dog, away from its home, will be aggressive towards strangers. In her job, my ex girlfriend has been cornered by golden retrievers, labs, and even small "Paris Hilton" dogs. Dogs away from home are very scared, and their instinct is to defend themselves so they get very defensive. So, Rocko, the behavior you see in your neighbor's dog is very common and does not mean that it will attack humans. The fact that it has cornered humans and not attacked them suggests that he will not attack unless he is attacked.


Still, because anything can happen, stay away from any stray dogs, and make sure to keep all children away from all stray dogs. You are very justified in being worried, and your neighbor must be taught to keep his dog secure at all times. Simply report him to the police. The city will have no problem taking away a dog from a owner who can't keep it secure. That is the first rule of owning a dog. You must keep it secure and safe. If you can back up that this has happened more than once, there is a good chance the city will take the dog away, at least until it can be sure that the owner has taken proper measures to keep the dog secure. The city has zero tolerance for owners like your neighbor.

That is a very scary situation, good luck.


Thank you! Lots of misinformation going on in this thread related to pit bulls.

TeamSelig
03-30-2008, 01:44 PM
Whatever the meaning of brandishing is - there is still no brandishing law in PA.

jmac
03-30-2008, 02:19 PM
The annoying part is that the dog threatened one of his other neighbors, not him. Yet, he feels the need to go onto the dog owners property and try to intimidate the owner. Let the police do their job. Stop trying to be Charles Bronson:rolleyes:

If this is directed at my original post, let me explain something.
We live in an area where there are basically 3 families.
The dog owner,myself,my neighbor which happens to be my mother-in-law/father-in-law.
My father-in-law was the one cornered and all three families are in easy walking distance.
My mother-in-law was taking garbage out one night when it got out and barely got back to house.
Also, I asked in my original post what i "can legally do !
There was no trying to be charles bronson insinuated on my part so before you accuse and roll eyes, please read more carefully.

Anyway, I did go the the authorities the other day about it as the dog has got out again since i originally posted it thursday night.
They said for me to go to the county attorney and get something sent to them on paper which I am doing.
He also said " Rocko, I will say if that dog gets on your ground and is menacing or terrozing in any way, you have every right to take care of the problem yourself".

Oh yeah Red in Chicago, No, I havent directly been outside when this has happened. However the other night my daughter who is six was at her grandma's and it was time for her to come home which her grandma always walks her home.
I heard a commotion outside and opened door to hear the search party (neighbors) out yelling to try to find the dog before someone got hurt.
I immediately made the call telling grandma to keep my daughter inside till this thing was caught.
They was running ten minutes late in leaving or my little girl would have been outside at the time and that was the last straw as far as I am concerned !

Red in Chicago
03-30-2008, 04:50 PM
If this is directed at my original post, let me explain something.
We live in an area where there are basically 3 families.
The dog owner,myself,my neighbor which happens to be my mother-in-law/father-in-law.
My father-in-law was the one cornered and all three families are in easy walking distance.
My mother-in-law was taking garbage out one night when it got out and barely got back to house.
Also, I asked in my original post what i "can legally do !
There was no trying to be charles bronson insinuated on my part so before you accuse and roll eyes, please read more carefully.

Anyway, I did go the the authorities the other day about it as the dog has got out again since i originally posted it thursday night.
They said for me to go to the county attorney and get something sent to them on paper which I am doing.
He also said " Rocko, I will say if that dog gets on your ground and is menacing or terrozing in any way, you have every right to take care of the problem yourself".

Oh yeah Red in Chicago, No, I havent directly been outside when this has happened. However the other night my daughter who is six was at her grandma's and it was time for her to come home which her grandma always walks her home.
I heard a commotion outside and opened door to hear the search party (neighbors) out yelling to try to find the dog before someone got hurt.
I immediately made the call telling grandma to keep my daughter inside till this thing was caught.
They was running ten minutes late in leaving or my little girl would have been outside at the time and that was the last straw as far as I am concerned !

Um, my post wasn't geared toward you Rocko.

vaticanplum
03-30-2008, 04:58 PM
Not it my state, the firearm was visable, and I have a permit, you need to learn the law. The saftey of my children comes first, I make no apology for that ever. I will not allow someone else's irresponsible behavior put my children in danger. I will be proactive, always. My children will never be in danger of someone else or someone else's dog in their own yard. If you do not feel the same way I feel sorry for your kids, if you have any.

The implication that any parent who does not own firearms isn't interested in protecting his kids is a little bananas, George.

You can have a rational discussion about your rights without pitying Ltlabner's theoretical unprotected children.

jmac
03-30-2008, 05:09 PM
Um, my post wasn't geared toward you Rocko.

No problem.
Just misunderstood ya. :thumbup:

SunDeck
03-30-2008, 09:53 PM
I think threatening to shoot someone's dog is justified, but I also think that should be a last resort. Well, actually killing the dog is the last resort, but you get my drift. And just as an aside, if some guy comes into my yard with a handgun tucked in his belt, the first thing I'm doing is ducking into the house to unlock my 12 gauge. That idea is just crazy talk- you don't need to carry the gun with you to threaten to kill the dog, and if you do carry it with you there is a very good chance you may get a nice hole in yourself. That ought to make it pretty hard to protect your kids in the future, if you ask me. You can just as easily pick up the phone and tell the guy what to expect if he doesn't take care of this.

Anyway, I'm not sure what you mean by saying the neighbor has been warned repeatedly, but if it's not been by the authorities my suggestion would be to make sure they get involved. You have every right in the world to ask them to intervene in this situation. I assume that you have also asked this person in a reasonably tone to take appropriate measures to keep the dog under control, but if you haven't there is no harm in trying to do so. But I don't know the guy, so you know better whether that will work or not.

Having said that, if you or your loved ones are threatened by this dog before the sheriff can help iron it out, then by all means, do what you have to do. Just make sure you don't end up shooting the person you are trying to protect.

Ltlabner
03-31-2008, 06:20 AM
Off on a tangent, but there always seems to be a dog on the loose in my neighborhood. Just the other day I got a frantic lab that had no collar back home after he was spotted just "hanging out" all day.

I understand that dogs can get loose now and again, but it happens so regularly that I wonder if some folks around here even try to keep their dogs fenced in. I don't mind playing "search & rescue" for the local dogs, but it's not really fair to the dog.

Yachtzee
03-31-2008, 06:19 PM
Off on a tangent, but there always seems to be a dog on the loose in my neighborhood. Just the other day I got a frantic lab that had no collar back home after he was spotted just "hanging out" all day.

I understand that dogs can get loose now and again, but it happens so regularly that I wonder if some folks around here even try to keep their dogs fenced in. I don't mind playing "search & rescue" for the local dogs, but it's not really fair to the dog.

I like the invisible fence, personally. I wish more dog owners would get them because it lets the dog run around in the yard without worrying about it getting loose in the neighborhood. Works great for my border collie mix. Unfortunately, I don't think they work well with pit bulls because their necks are so big and strong the shock collar doesn't phase them. The only other problems is that some people run the fence right along the sidewalk, when you should really have it at least 10 ft off the sidewalk so that your dog can't run right up to people walking past.

WMR
03-31-2008, 06:39 PM
Well, the other scary thing like that is for dog owners like me. I have a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Not exactly the most vicious dog. hehe. I would always worry about another dog coming into the yard and attacking them.

SunDeck
03-31-2008, 06:57 PM
"A yard is just a bigger cage."

That's what a vet said to me once. What he meant was that having a yard should not replace exercising your dog. Male dogs especially need to get out into the neighborhood to mark, to see who else is occupying their territory, and to learn about their surroundings. Keeping a male dog in a yard prevents them from doing what their instincts tell them to do.

That's no reason to let them wander; instead the critters need to get out with you on that leash a couple times a day. The particular dog that caused the quote above was a male Labrador Retriever I had just taken off a friends hands. The vet was telling me I had just taken on the responsibility to make sure this sporting dog got the right care and attention. It was a lot of work, but I'm convinced he was a better dog for it.

Ltlabner
03-31-2008, 07:33 PM
The vet was telling me I had just taken on the responsibility to make sure this sporting dog got the right care and attention. It was a lot of work, but I'm convinced he was a better dog for it.

That was part of the problem of the stray lab I returned the other day. Poor thing was grosly overweight and the owner couldn't figure out why it always darted out of the yard at any given chance after sitting inside doing nothing all day.

We have to get back into the pattern of walking our girl now that winter is over. Mrs Ltlabner usually walks the dog 3 or 4 times week and I'll do it once or twice. Now that it isn't subzero and snowy the dog has been giving us subtle hints like standing at the front door or staring longinly at her leash.

Yachtzee
03-31-2008, 08:34 PM
Well, the other scary thing like that is for dog owners like me. I have a Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Not exactly the most vicious dog. hehe. I would always worry about another dog coming into the yard and attacking them.

Watch out for those Corgis. They can take you right out at the ankles. ;)

RFS62
03-31-2008, 11:21 PM
Watch out for those Corgis. They can take you right out at the ankles. ;)

TeamCasey
04-01-2008, 04:30 PM
I don't think they had invisible fence back in my dog's day.

Scares the crap out of me when I'm out walking and loose dogs come tearing at you right to the edge of the road.

They seem cool though. All the neighborhood kids loved my dog and vice versa. We lived on a quiet dead end street. He would've loved sitting at the edge of our yard while they were out playing ball and whatnot. He was a a big dopey Samoyed/Lab mix. I don't think the shock through all that fur would've phased him enough to keep him in the yard.

I couldn't trust him with anyone in a uniform though. He had a habit of pinning the meter man against the wall in our garage. (Who was dumb enough to open a garage door with a big Beware of Dog sign on it).

The cops came to our house because my brother's car died and was left somewhere. My dog wouldn't let the cop get out of the car. He didn't bite or growl ...... he just put his big paws on the windows and told the uniformed stranger that he should stay where he was. :)

Ltlabner
04-01-2008, 07:53 PM
So on the invisable fence deals...do they do anything to keep other dogs out of your yard? I'd hate to have the loose dogs in the neighborhood driving my dog nuts while she is basically "trapped" in her yard.

WMR
04-01-2008, 08:42 PM
No, Lt. It is totally dependent on the collar capable of delivering a shock if the boundary is breached. The animal learns the boundaries and will stay within them. Outside animals can enter at will.

Yachtzee
04-01-2008, 09:41 PM
No, Lt. It is totally dependent on the collar capable of delivering a shock if the boundary is breached. The animal learns the boundaries and will stay within them. Outside animals can enter at will.

This is true. Personally I feel it's much better than putting the dog out on a chain like some folks do. The poor things start running after another dog, reach the end of the chain, and get choked. With invisible fence, I've never really had issues with dogs roaming into my yard too much because my dog is a dominant border collie mix and chases any that enter out of the yard. She stays in the yard and keeps the others out. In fact, the neighbor whose dog is always roaming free just broke down and got invisible fence installed because the neighbors got together and had a talk to him.

By the way WMR, how's school treating you?

WMR
04-01-2008, 09:42 PM
Umm, ready to get the hell out of here, quite honestly. :D

Yachtzee
04-01-2008, 09:51 PM
Umm, ready to get the hell out of here, quite honestly. :D

I know the feeling. It will be over soon, right? Good luck. :thumbup:

WMR
04-01-2008, 09:53 PM
Thanks buddy. Yep, the end is nigh.

bucksfan
04-02-2008, 12:01 PM
So on the invisable fence deals...do they do anything to keep other dogs out of your yard? I'd hate to have the loose dogs in the neighborhood driving my dog nuts while she is basically "trapped" in her yard.

My opinion on invsible fences is that they are a decent solution for supervised control of your pet. However I would never trust them for unsupervised simply because of the fact you mention that other animals can get in.

Of course everyone's situation is different, and with me having no neighbors and lotsa room, the invisible fence is not necessarily attractive to me from a containment perspective (altho' I can see some applications for it like keeping our dog out of the garden, especially when it is planted and/or muddy!!). We have a large portion of our yard well fenced in (though of course not 100% critter proof). We still do not leave our dogs outside unsupervised for any great length of time.

Our golden accompanies me on my general outside chores and he is able to be trusted un-restrained under supervision. But that is because of where we live. I would not do it in a town setting because he still may want to chase something and run into the street, scare other people walking by (even tho' he's harmless they do not know that!) , etc... That is where IMO an invisible fence does come in handy if you do not want or cannot have real fencing.

MWM
04-02-2008, 12:49 PM
So on the invisable fence deals...do they do anything to keep other dogs out of your yard? I'd hate to have the loose dogs in the neighborhood driving my dog nuts while she is basically "trapped" in her yard.

Nope and that was one of the reasons we decided against it. Instead, I put up a chain link all by myself.

Not only can you not keep oterh animals out of your yard, but if your dog somehow gets out, they will not want to go near the line for fear of getting shocked so they won't go back in.

Also, some types of dogs are more motivated by chasing something like a squirrel that they'll go right through it without thinking about it. And once they realize that it's only a brief shock that doesn't last, they'll have little hesitation to go through it again. If that happens you've just spend a lot of money on something that no longer works.

Yachtzee
04-02-2008, 08:24 PM
Nope and that was one of the reasons we decided against it. Instead, I put up a chain link all by myself.

Not only can you not keep oterh animals out of your yard, but if your dog somehow gets out, they will not want to go near the line for fear of getting shocked so they won't go back in.

Also, some types of dogs are more motivated by chasing something like a squirrel that they'll go right through it without thinking about it. And once they realize that it's only a brief shock that doesn't last, they'll have little hesitation to go through it again. If that happens you've just spend a lot of money on something that no longer works.

That's when you increase the shock on the collar. Invisible fence is also only as effective as the training you give the dog to familiarize it with the boundaries.

I can't do a regular fence with my dog. She can easily jump a 6 foot fence and can get close enough to the top of an 8 foot fence to make us nervous. Since we don't feel like surrounding our yard with the Green Monster (and I doubt zoning laws would permit it), Invisible Fence has been our only option.

bucksfan
04-02-2008, 09:06 PM
She can easily jump a 6 foot fence and can get close enough to the top of an 8 foot fence to make us nervous. Since we don't feel like surrounding our yard with the Green Monster (and I doubt zoning laws would permit it), Invisible Fence has been our only option.

Yeah, that would be a problem! I am fortunate that the jumping talent is allocated completely to our little Havanese while our golden is more earthbound. Otherwise I'd have to rethink my situation. :)

Red in Chicago
04-02-2008, 11:39 PM
Nope and that was one of the reasons we decided against it. Instead, I put up a chain link all by myself.

Not only can you not keep oterh animals out of your yard, but if your dog somehow gets out, they will not want to go near the line for fear of getting shocked so they won't go back in.

Also, some types of dogs are more motivated by chasing something like a squirrel that they'll go right through it without thinking about it. And once they realize that it's only a brief shock that doesn't last, they'll have little hesitation to go through it again. If that happens you've just spend a lot of money on something that no longer works.

That was my thought on the invisible fence as well. I opted for the 6' stockade fence, despite the fact that my dog is a toy fox terrier. He acts like a big dog ;)