PDA

View Full Version : Cueto's Start - Wow



reds44
04-03-2008, 04:22 PM
Video and Story (http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/gameday_recap.jsp?ymd=20080403&content_id=2488067&vkey=recap&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin)



CINCINNATI -- In his Major League debut, Reds righty Johnny Cueto was perfect through five innings and earned the victory in Thursday afternoon's 3-2 Reds win over the Diamondbacks at Great American Ball Park.
Cincinnati took two of three from Arizona in the clubs' opening series of the 2008 season.

Working under a steady rain all day, Cueto retired eight of his first 15 batters on strikeouts. He had a 3-0 lead when Arizona finally broke through in the sixth with Justin Upton's leadoff home run into the left-field seats.

It was the only blemish of Cueto's day. Overall, the 22-year-old right-hander pitched seven innings and struck out 10 without issuing a walk. He faced one batter over the minimum before being lifted after the seventh with 92 pitches.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Cueto was the first pitcher since Boston's Daisuke Matsuzaka last season to strike out 10 batters in his Major League debut. Since 1900, no Reds pitcher had accomplished the feat.

Using a two-out rally in the bottom of the first inning, the Reds took a 2-0 lead on D-backs starter Doug Davis. Ken Griffey Jr. started the rally with a blooped ground-rule double near the line in short left field. Brandon Phillips' RBI double into the left-field corner scored Griffey.

After Davis issued back-to-back walks, second baseman Orlando Hudson booted Scott Hatteberg's routine ground ball, which would have been the final out. Phillips scored on the error.

With two outs in the second, Reds shortstop Jeff Keppinger made it a three-run game with a home run into the left-field seats. Davis (0-1) lasted 3 2/3 innings and allowed three runs (two earned) on four hits, walking six. He struck out four.

The game still got tight for Cincinnati in the eighth, when reliever David Weathers walked the bases loaded with one out. Mike Lincoln, in his first big league apperance since May 3, 2004, put out the fire by getting pinch-hitter Alex Romero to hit a sacrifice fly and striking out Chris Young.

Francisco Cordero pitched the ninth and earned his first save as a member of the Reds.

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 04:29 PM
For some reason I can't get MLB.com videos to work for me anymore ever since they upgraded the media player. Can someone upload it to youtube or something?

redsrule2500
04-03-2008, 04:29 PM
For some reason I can't get MLB.com videos to work for me anymore ever since they upgraded the media player. Can someone upload it to youtube or something?

You just need to install microsoft silverlight....it takes a few seconds.

EDIT: or was that a joke lol

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 04:30 PM
You just need to install microsoft silverlight....it takes a few seconds.

I did and it's still not working.

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 04:40 PM
I just tried to download Silverlight 1.0 and it says the download failed because Silverlight 1.1 is already installed and needs to be deleted first. I looked all over my computer and don't see 1.1 anywhere.

TOBTTReds
04-03-2008, 04:53 PM
You just need to install microsoft silverlight....it takes a few seconds.

EDIT: or was that a joke lol

I've been on the phone with MS about Silverlight way too much this week. My comp is rejecting it. Is the video quality a lot better?

HumnHilghtFreel
04-03-2008, 04:54 PM
I've been on the phone with MS about Silverlight way too much this week. My comp is rejecting it. Is the video quality a lot better?

The quality is only better on the 1.2MB stream, which they only offer when watching live.

MrCinatit
04-03-2008, 04:57 PM
His stuff looks absolutely evil - and it looked like Bako rarely had to move his glove after calling for the pitch.
Nice debut effort. Now, if he can keep this up, we might be onto something.

HumnHilghtFreel
04-03-2008, 05:00 PM
His slider is hard and nasty. And his changeup just drops at the end. Complemented by a 96 mph heater, that ain't bad.

The most impressive thing today though, was his control. Especially given the rainy conditions. I also loved the way he responded after Upton tagged the homerun. He just kind of shook it off and got right back to work on the next batter.

klw
04-03-2008, 05:01 PM
I guess the dead arm period is done.

What speed was his change coming in at?

RedsManRick
04-03-2008, 05:04 PM
I've been on the phone with MS about Silverlight way too much this week. My comp is rejecting it. Is the video quality a lot better?

I haven't noticed better video quality, but I've found Silverlight seems to load video faster than just about anything else.

Stormy
04-03-2008, 05:14 PM
I guess the dead arm period is done.

What speed was his change coming in at?

A consistent 85-86, and what seems most impressive is that his arm motion appears to be almost identical on all 3 plus pitches. Indiscernible as to what's coming, and if you start the bat early looking fastball (as you almost have to) and get either offspeed pitch, you're toast. He's filthy, and his pinpoint control and composure were almost unreal today. He works both sides of the plate so well, and with such frequency, batters don't even know where to look for that 95+ heat, which only makes it that much more effective.

Ravenlord
04-03-2008, 05:23 PM
i can't help but notice that Cueto hit 96 on the gun at GAB...

...just sayin'



http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66809

princeton
04-03-2008, 05:24 PM
should promote that Almaraz guy who signed Cueto for $3500.

Whoops.

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 05:44 PM
Check out the quote from Eric Byrnes:

Cueto sensational in big league debut
Reds righty loses perfect game in sixth amid 10-strikeout gem
By Mark Sheldon / MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Not even Mother Nature could mess with Johnny Cueto.

Steady rain pelted away at Great American Ball Park on Thursday afternoon, but not enough to stop a game. The Diamondbacks kept swinging away, but they could not stop Cueto, either.

As far as Major League debuts go, they rarely get more sensational. The 22-year-old Cueto pitched seven innings -- retiring the first 15 batters he faced -- and struck out 10 in the Reds' 3-2 win over the Diamondbacks. It gave Cincinnati two out of three in the season's first series.

"Boy, that is some debut there," Reds manager Dusty Baker said. "The way he threw the ball today has no age to it."

No Major League pitcher had debuted with at least five perfect innings since Seattle's Ken Cloude in 1997. With his fastball often reaching 96 mph, Cueto (1-0) pumped fastballs inside and then got nastier with a low-90s slider and high-80s changeup. Armed with an early 3-0 lead, the right-hander retired eight of his first 15 batters with strikeouts.

Cueto was off and running after he struck out the game's first batter, Chris Young, swinging on a 96 mph fastball.

"I was very confident," Cueto said through interpreter and mentor Mario Soto. "I was thinking of throwing seven shutout innings. That's what I had in mind."

He almost got there. Arizona finally broke up the perfect game in the sixth inning with Justin Upton's leadoff home run into the left-field seats. It was the D-backs' only hit of the game.

The home run didn't seem to faze Cueto, however -- he retired his final six batters. To finish the sixth, he got pinch-hitter Jeff Salazar to whiff on an 88 mph changeup, and Young was frozen on a 94 mph fastball for strike three.

"I went back and started the same way I was throwing before," Cueto said. "I knew I was throwing a no-hitter, but it went away. I just went back, and I didn't want to give up any more runs. I worked harder."

In a two-out rally in the bottom of the first, the Reds took a 2-0 lead on D-backs starter Doug Davis. Ken Griffey Jr. started the rally with a blooped ground-rule double near the line in short left field. Brandon Phillips' RBI double into the left-field corner scored Griffey.

After Davis (0-1) issued back-to-back walks, second baseman Orlando Hudson booted Scott Hatteberg's routine ground ball, which would have been the final out. Phillips scored on the error. With two outs in the second, Reds shortstop Jeff Keppinger made it a three-run game with a home run into the left-field seats.

Defense played a part in keeping Arizona down. In the fourth, left fielder Adam Dunn made a nice catch on Hudson's fly ball for the third out before he crashed into the fence. Cueto waited on the field to gratefully high-five Dunn, who also made a nice catch on Mark Reynolds' low liner in the fifth.

Other than that, Cueto had taken over the game.

Cueto threw 92 pitches overall in seven innings, including an astounding 68 for strikes. There were only a handful of two-ball counts, and he never reached three balls against any batter. Since he never had anyone on base, Cueto never had to work from the stretch.

"The fact he had no walks, that was most impressive," Baker said. "I'm excited to hear the guys on the bench talking. They're saying they haven't seen this in a long time. I don't think they've ever seen it."

No Reds player has seen it, at least -- this century or last. Cueto's 10 Ks was the most during a Cincinnati debut since that kind of record started being kept in 1900. Boston's Daisuke Matsuzaka was the last pitcher to record 10 strikeouts in his Major League debut, which he did last season.

"He throws everything hard -- his changeup drops, too," said Arizona left fielder Eric Byrnes, who struck out three times, twice against Cueto. "We didn't count on him throwing so many strikes. For the most part, he threw good strikes -- you know, strikes on the corner. He made it difficult."

A native of San Pedro de Macoris, Cueto became a product of the Reds' Dominican academy after he signed in 2004. At this time last year, he was pitching for Class A Sarasota but reached Triple-A for four games.

Did Baker have any words of advice for Cueto before the game got under way?

"I just told him, 'Con calma y confidencia,'" Baker said. "It means 'Confidence and be calm.' And he was."

"Seeing his face, you can tell he's not worried about nothing," said closer Francisco Cordero, a fellow Dominican who has taken Cueto under his wing.

The game got tense, though, for Cincinnati after Cueto departed. Reliever David Weathers walked the bases loaded with one out in the eighth. Mike Lincoln, in his first big league appearance since May 3, 2004, after undergoing two Tommy John elbow reconstruction surgeries, put out the fire. He got pinch-hitter Alex Romero to hit a sacrifice fly and struck out Young.

Cordero retired all three of his batters in the ninth for his first save as a member of the Reds before the handful of the 11,987 fans that braved the inclement conditions.

"Cueto was so good today that people didn't notice it," Cordero said. "Not even myself. I just wanted to get my job done so he could get the win. When you pitch like that, you deserve to get a win, especially in a big league debut with that weather."

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/gameday_recap.jsp?ymd=20080403&content_id=2488067&vkey=recap&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

fearofpopvol1
04-03-2008, 05:55 PM
I always like going to the opposing team's website after games like today and here is what it said:

http://arizona.diamondbacks.mlb.com/news/gameday_recap.jsp?ymd=20080403&content_id=2487401&vkey=recap&fext=.jsp&c_id=ari

CINCINNATI -- The D-backs really had no business being within striking distance at the end of Thursday's game with the Reds.
Arizona pitchers walked nine and the offense managed one hit. If you just looked at those numbers, you had to think they got beat handily.

Instead, the D-backs somehow were able to stay close and make things interesting in a 3-2 loss in front of 11,987 rain-soaked fans at Great American Ballpark.

"You're not going to win many games with one hit and walking nine guys," Arizona manager Bob Melvin said.

And you're not going to win many games when you face a pitcher that is dealing the way Cincinnati's Johnny Cueto was. The rookie right-hander mixed a 96-mph fastball with an upper-80s slider and changeup to strike out 10 in seven innings.

Wait, a changeup in the upper 80s?

"He threw everything hard," said outfielder Eric Byrnes, who fanned three times in the game, twice against Cueto. "He looked good. Obviously, he's got great stuff. Fastball, he spotted on both sides of the plate, good breaking ball, threw his changeup -- he had everything."

The lone blemish for Cueto came when Justin Upton led off the sixth with the D-backs' first hit, a homer into the left-field bleachers on a 1-2 fastball. Upton faced Cueto two years ago in the Class A Midwest League and saw the potential in the 22-year-old back then.

"He's the same guy, a little better command," Upton said. "He was unbelievable two years ago. He's got great stuff and he pounds the zone with it, and that's what makes him effective. He's just a great pitcher."

The D-backs fell behind in this one from the start when starter Doug Davis couldn't seem to find his command. The left-hander, who will have surgery on April 10 to remove a cancerous thyroid, lasted just 3 2/3 innings, having allowed three runs (two earned) on four hits and walking a whopping six batters. Of the 87 pitches he threw, just 43 were for strikes.

"I got in trouble with walks, falling behind guys, you know, just not throwing to contact," he said. "After that, it was really hard for me to get into a rhythm. I had no rhythm out there. I was just falling behind. I couldn't find my release point."

A lot of times Davis is able to rediscover his release point, but he was unable to do so Thursday. Davis had trouble getting adjusted to the baseballs Thursday, though he was careful to point out that he wasn't using that as an excuse.

"Sometimes it was slick, sometimes it was grippy," he said. "It just was not consistent."

There's no question that Davis hurt himself with all the walks, but in fairness, he just as easily could have escaped the first inning with one or no runs scoring rather than two.

After the first two batters of the frame were retired, Ken Griffey Jr. blooped a ball down the left-field line that landed just inches fair for a double. Then, with the bases loaded and one run in, Scott Hatteberg hit a routine grounder to second. It was a ball that Orlando Hudson, who has won three straight Gold Gloves, usually could handle in his sleep, but this time he booted it to allow another run to score.

The Reds added a run in the second on a homer by Jeff Keppinger, and a 3-0 lead seemed insurmountable given the way Cueto was throwing.

"Like Griffey told me, he reminded him of a young Pedro [Martinez]," Hudson said of a conversation he had two days ago with the Reds outfielder. "If he holds out -- and I hope he does -- he'll have a great career."

The D-backs' bullpen came through in a big way, as they held the Reds right where they were with 4 1/3 scoreless innings, to keep things at 3-1.

In the eighth, Reds reliever David Weathers had his own troubles locating the strike zone, as he retired Stephen Drew to start the eight before walking three straight batters to load the bases.

Baker then summoned Mike Lincoln from the bullpen to face pinch-hitter Alex Romero, who lifted a sacrifice fly to left to score Mark Reynolds and cut the Cincinnati lead to 3-2.

The D-backs, though, could get no closer, as Chris Young fanned to end the frame. The punch out capped a frustrating day for Young, who was 0-for-4 with four strikeouts.

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 06:14 PM
I think SportsCenter is about to talk about Cueto. They just went to commerical but ran a little baseball preview and said 'Is there a star born in Cincinnati?'.

redsmetz
04-03-2008, 07:05 PM
Here is the blurb from the Arizona Republic's reporter:


Cueto handcuffs D-Backs in debut

by NIck Piecoro - Apr. 3, 2008 02:54 PM
The Arizona Republic

CINCINNATI - The Diamondbacks got a first-hand look at the most hyped young pitcher in baseball. Reds right-hander Johnny Cueto lived up to the billing.

Cueto pitched seven superb innings in his major league debut, striking out 10 and allowing just one hit – a solo home run to Justin Upton – as the Reds beat the Diamondbacks 3-2 on Thursday afternoon at Great American Ball Park, giving them a two-games-to-one series victory to open the season.

Cueto retired 21 of the 22 batters he faced by firing mid-90s fastballs and a hard, nasty slider.

Cueto, 22, set down the first 15 batters he faced before Upton crushed an inside fastball, sending into the stands in left field. He then retired the final six batters before departing after 92 pitches.

Diamondbacks left-hander Doug Davis, making the first of two scheduled starts before undergoing surgery for thyroid cancer, did not look sharp, struggling badly with his command in 3 2/3 innings. The Reds scored three runs (two earned) off Davis, who walked six and allowed four hits.

Cueto became the first Reds pitcher since 1900 to have 10 strikeouts in his major league debut.

Take that you ten year old ballclub!

Rojo
04-03-2008, 08:07 PM
Anyone remember a pitcher who came up in the late 80's and had a great start, then went on to obscurity? I thought his name was Mo Sanders, but I can't find him at any of the baseball sites.

Am I losing it?

Where am I?

PS: I'm not making the assertion that Cueto is a flash-in-the-pan.

lollipopcurve
04-03-2008, 08:10 PM
Anyone remember a pitcher who came up in the late 80's and had a great start, then went on to obscurity? I thought his name was Mo Sanders, but I can't find him at any of the baseball sites.


Mo Sanford. I was thinking about him today, too.

Rojo
04-03-2008, 08:15 PM
Mo Sanford. I was thinking about him today, too.

God bless you. Its been driving me crazy all day. For some reason I thought he came up before the 90 team and I checked every roster 84-89.

I was right about the premier taking place in SD (lived there at the time but didn't see the game). He went 7, gave up 2 hits, 1 walk while fanning 8.

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 08:26 PM
Cueto is really, really good
Thursday, April 3, 2008, 05:26 PM EST [General]

Before Johnny Cueto made his major league debut, Reds manager Dusty Baker had a simple message for his 22-year old starter: "con calma, confianza."

Baker said it translated to "be calm, confident."

He could have added "extraordinario" -- because that’s what Cueto was on Thursday, striking out 10 and giving up only one hit and no walks in seven innings in his big league debut, a 3-2 Reds victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks.

The thing is, Baker's instructions were like telling a tree to be still or water to be wet.

"He shook his head like he always does, that little boy smile of his," Baker said. "He said, 'OK, no problem.'"

Cueto pitched like not only were his nerves no problem, neither were the Diamondbacks. He was the first Red since 1900 (when the records can be traced) to strike out 10 batters in his Major League debut. Daisuke Matsuzaka accomplished the feat last season for the Boston Red Sox.

"I'm giddy inside. I'm very excited," Baker said after the game. "I'm excited to hear the guys on the bench talking. They're saying they haven't seen this in a long time. In fact, I don't think they've ever seen it. There's a lot of things they haven't seen -- but there's a lot more to see from this young man."

To those outside the Reds camp, Thursday must have been some kind of revelation.

"That's Jake Peavy-like," said Arizona's Orlando Hudson. "He's got that type of stuff. Like (Ken) Griffey told me, he reminded him of a young Pedro (Martinez). If he holds out -- and I hope he does -- he'll have a great career."

But the Reds weren't shocked to see Cueto find such success in his first outing.

"If it'd been the first time I caught him, maybe, but it didn't surprise me," said Reds catcher Paul Bako. "It was nice to see and it was awesome, but the way he handles himself and the confidence he has to go with the ability he has, it doesn't surprise me."

Said reliever Mike Lincoln, "That was a special outing, but we saw that in spring. He's got the kind of stuff that he can do that every time out. He's a competitor and he's got the stuff to carry him to another level."

Cueto's performance was so impressive that it overshadowed the Reds' $46-million man, Francisco Cordero, picking up his first save as a Red.

"People may not notice (me today), not even myself," Cordero said. "I just wanted to get my job done so he could get the win. I wanted him to get the win in the big league debut. My concern was getting three outs, get the save and hand the ball to him."

Cueto struck out the first batter he faced, Arizona center fielder Chris Young, and continued to roll, retiring the first 15 batters he faced until right fielder Justin Upton led off the sixth inning with a home run.

"I was thinking about a no-hitter, but it went away," Cueto said through interpreter Mario Soto. "I went right back and I didn't want to give up any more runs."

Following the homer, he got catcher Robby Hammock to ground out on a dribbler right in front of the mound and then struck out pinch hitter Jeff Salazar and Young to end the inning.

Cueto then worked a 1-2-3 seventh inning, finishing with 92 pitch (68 strikes) and his last pitch was a 94 mph fastball to Byrnes that was grounded to shortstop for an easy out.

"Sometimes people come out worried, but seeing (Cueto's) face, he’s not like that. He wasn't worried. He was concentrating on going out there, making pitchers and get people out," Cordero said. "He made a good point in spring training. He's only 22 and the way he pitched in spring training. The way he was pitching in the Dominican winter ball, I knew he was going to be good. This is just the first one, but I hope he keeps it that way or better, because he deserves it."

David Weathers walked the bases loaded in the eighth inning, but Lincoln was able to come in and get a sacrifice fly and a strikeout (again of Young, who struck out four times on the day) to end the inning. Lincoln was appearing in his first big league game since May 3, 2004, following two Tommy John surgeries.

"I guess there are easier ways to come in, but at some point I've got to come in and get it done," said Lincoln. "I don't doubt myself, it was whether my arm would hold up and I'd get a shot."

Most other days, Lincoln would have had the crowd of reporters around his locker after the game, but this wasn't just any other day, so only a couple waited for him at his locker.

"It was real nice to see Johnny come out and not change a thing. He didn’t seem nervous, more excited than nervous. It was nice to see he stuck with his game plan and attacked the hitters," Bako said."It's kind of hard to top that. He gave us a chance to win the ballgame. He showed his stuff and was lighting up the radar gun, but where he was putting it was more impressive than his stuff."

Soto said if the people in Cueto's native Dominican Republic weren't aware of his early afternoon dominance, they would at 5 p.m. when a national television program was sure to spread the news of the next Pedro Martinez.

"I guarantee you they know," Soto said. "There's a program at 5 p.m, and if they didn’t know about it by 5, they know now."

So does everyone else.

http://www.thelotd.com/ctrent/

reds44
04-03-2008, 08:39 PM
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20080403/SPT04/304030104/



OPENING DAY, 2026 – Forty-year-old right-hander Johnny “No-No” Cueto added to his Hall of Fame resume today, pitching the Reds past the Hiroshima Carp in the Very International League opener for both clubs.

Cueto’s one-hit shutout in Cincinnati’s 3-0 win was the 60th one-hitter of his 18-year big-league career, tying the major-league record set four years ago by former teammate Edinson Volquez.

Cueto needed just 88 pitches to record his 299th big-league win. He’ll go for No. 300 next week, against long-time Reds rival Caracas, Venezuela. Cueto’s bid for a 20th career no-hitter ended with one out in the ninth, when Sadaharu Oh III dropped a drag bunt that hugged the third-base line and somehow stayed fair.

“It was going foul, then it hit a pebble or something,” suggested Reds third baseman, Truman Capote “Chris” Sabo.

Was Johnny Cueto great, or what?

As major-league debuts go, this one ranks with the opening of Carnegie Hall: Seven innings, one hit, no walks, 10 strikeouts. Ninety-two pitches, 68 strikes. The man threw 90 mph sliders. For the first five of his seven innings, I counted one pitch slower than 86. He was throwing 88 mph changeups, kids.

You could have been a blind man at this game and known what was going on. A fastball finding a catcher’s glove at 96 mph makes a sound all its own. Crowd reaction after pitches carried the same sounds as a circus man walking a high wire. Whole lotta Oooh-ing going on.

(By the way, we use the term “crowd” loosely. Exactly 11,987 souls bothered to attend.)

We tell ourselves: This is just one start. This is just one start on a dreary day-after-night game in which the Diamondbacks rested Conor Jackson and Chris Snyder. It’s the first time any of the Arizona players had seen Cueto.

Cueto wasn’t hatched from some Hall of Fame lab for pitchers. Before yesterday, He had never been in a major-league park, let alone pitched in one. His experience above Class Double-A consisted of 22 innings at Louisville last year.

But oh, my.

Seven Ks in the first four innings. Going after hitters like he’s a 10-year vet.

Throwing a perfect game through five innings, until Justin Upton sent a 94 mph fastball out of the park as fast as it came to the plate. Recovering from that little setback to retire the last six hitters he faced.

“That’s some debut right there,” manager Dusty Baker said. “I’m getting a little giddy inside.”

Baker likened the debut to that of Fernando Valenzuela’s as an L.A. Dodger. CuetoMania.

Cueto met the media afterward. He speaks no English, at least none he would like to share. He understands some, though. When a questioner said “no” and “hitter”, Cueto smiled, head bowed.

He’s listed at 5-foot-10, but looks shorter. He’s stocky, thick in the chest. A goatee covers his chin, slim sideburns knife from his temples to the goatee. Cueto has a baby face and a Broadway smile. He seemed to enjoy the attention.

“Habla, habla, habla,” said Soto. Cueto habla-ed in short bursts.

“First-game jitters?” someone wondered.

Cueto shook his head no.

“You were confident, then?”

Cueto shook his head yes.

“How much confidence did the start give you?”

“Just keep working, see what happens,” he said.

His new, big-brother friend, Reds closer Francisco Cordero, watched the game on a clubhouse TV. The view from the bullpen beyond left-center field isn’t as good.

“Amazing,” Cordero said.

He described Cueto pitches as “downhill, strikes, attacking hitters.”

Cordero said little to Cueto before the game, preferring to let the kid work out his own strategy and deal with his nerves alone.

“I didn’t want to be the guy who put something in his head. I didn’t want him thinking too much,” Cordero explained.

What we’re thinking now is, we don’t recall a debut like this around here. We don’t know what it means beyond Thursday. But we’d like very much to find out.

“Confidencia,” Baker said, describing his kid pitcher.

Hard to argue.


I really can't wait to see this towns reaction if Volquez has a strong start on Sunday.

reds44
04-03-2008, 08:40 PM
More from Fay


The Reds were not surprised by Johnny Cueto's one-hit, one-run, 10-strikeout, seven-inning debut. But they were giddy. Some examples:

Bronson Arroyo: "I never saw Pedro (Martinez) throw in his younger years in person. But he reminds me somewhat of him -- smaller guy, Dominican, throws the ball on a really low plane, 94 to 96, not an unbelievably big curveball -- Pedro's is bigger -- but a pitch to get them off the fastball and then good change. It was an unbelievable debut. A young guy, great circumstances -- not much of crowd, more of spring training feel -- any way you cut it it's a nerve-racking day. To do what he did, especially command-wise. When someone's throwing that hard, you'd expect them to be up in the zone a lot. He was just painting at the knee all day. Pretty nasty. The only debut I saw that came close to that was (Jonathan) Papelbon. He's turned out to be pretty damn good."

Francisco Cordero: "Unbelievable. Everything was downhill. Everything was a strike. He attacked the hitters. He made the pitches he wanted to make. Even the home run pitch wasn't bad. The guy just put a good swing on it. It was just amazing. I just wanted to get my job done so he got the win. When you pitch like that, you deserve a win, especially in your big debut."

Adam Dunn: "He's fun to play behind. He gets the ball and throws. He doesn't take a lot of time between pitches. He throws strikes. He's one of those special guys. You can tell it on the mound. He's total different on the mound than he is in the clubhouse. I don't know how describe it."

Paul Bako: "He's tough. He's going to be tough for quite a long time. It was nice to see him come out and be himself, not try to do too much. He obviously wasn't rattled. It really doesn't surprise me. It was very nice to see. Just the way he handles himself, the confidence he has and the ability he has, it doesn't surprise me. He's nice and cool and collected. He knows he's good. He doesn't exude cockiness but he's got confidence about him that just every time out we're going to have a chance to win."

Mike Lincoln: "That was a special outing. But we saw that in spring. He's got that kind of stuff to be able to pitch like that every start. You can see it in him. He's a competitor and he has the stuff to carry him to another level."

Dusty Baker: "What can I say about Johnny Cueto? Great debut. He threw strikes. The linescore says it: Seven innings, one run, one hit, 10 strikeouts. That is some debut right there."

RFS62
04-03-2008, 08:47 PM
A consistent 85-86, and what seems most impressive is that his arm motion appears to be almost identical on all 3 plus pitches. Indiscernible as to what's coming, and if you start the bat early looking fastball (as you almost have to) and get either offspeed pitch, you're toast. He's filthy, and his pinpoint control and composure were almost unreal today. He works both sides of the plate so well, and with such frequency, batters don't even know where to look for that 95+ heat, which only makes it that much more effective.




Yep, that's a beautiful description of what we saw today.

This was something special.

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2008, 08:56 PM
I had to pinch myself a few times during the game just to make sure I wasn't dreaming. It's not often you see the Reds call up a young pitcher of this caliber and then see him go out and dominate like he did today. Man was that fun. I didn't have the priveldge of watching it live or on TV but I still had a blast following it via the gamethread and then watching the highlights on MLB.com and sportscenter. Tim Kurkjian had great things to say about him. I'll be sure to watch Baseball Tonight at 12:30 to see what they have to say. After years of watching subpar pitchers like Paul Wilson, Jimmy Haynes, and Jimmy Anderson, it's finally nice to have young stud arms like Johnny Cueto and Edinson Volquez and Homer Bailey to gush over.

Blitz Dorsey
04-03-2008, 08:57 PM
We have been waiting a LONG time for this and it's been worth the wait. A home-grown stud pitcher. I was cautiously optimistic that he would live up to the hype. But he isn't just living up to it, he's exceeding it. I know it's only one game, but I'm also talking about spring training and just his overall presense/moxie. He is a special one for sure and I'm still pinching myself. 22 years old and we could have a nice rotation for years to come.

Aronchis
04-03-2008, 09:05 PM
Cueto with a very "sexy" outing with little worry about fatigue. I doubt Volquez's is as picture perfect, but he should do. Bailey will be "ugly nice" for a couple years.

HotCorner
04-03-2008, 09:05 PM
I can not wait for next Tuesday to see him live ... via the TV.

klw
04-03-2008, 09:36 PM
So does this relieve or increase the pressure on Volquez for Sunday?

redsrule2500
04-03-2008, 09:43 PM
So does this relieve or increase the pressure on Volquez for Sunday?

Increases IMO. That's the only negative thing I took from this whole thing haha :rolleyes:

Spitball
04-03-2008, 09:45 PM
So does this relieve or increase the pressure on Volquez for Sunday?

I wouldn't think anyone would expect anything similar from anyone.

Does anyone else remember a young Gary Nolan's debut where he struck out the side versus the Astros to start his career? In another start early in his first season, he struck out 15 Giants, including Willie Mays four times.

Caveat Emperor
04-03-2008, 09:45 PM
So does this relieve or increase the pressure on Volquez for Sunday?

A little friendly competition between the two kids is a very healthy thing, IMO.

redsrule2500
04-03-2008, 09:47 PM
A little friendly competition between the two kids is a very healthy thing, IMO.

That's true as well. Just depends on how Volquez looks at things I guess.

RedFanAlways1966
04-03-2008, 09:49 PM
Last quality start game by a REDS starter while allowing only 1 hit and also the last game where the opposition had only 1 hit in the game... April 26, 2006.

Bronson Arroyo at Washington Nationals. 8IP, 1H. Single by Ryan Zimmerman w/ 2 outs in the 4th inning. Kent Mercker (0.2) and David Weathers (last out) pitched a hitless 9th inning.

coachw513
04-03-2008, 10:00 PM
FWIW, if anyone would like a copy of the game, I did record it and would be happy to make a copy onto DVD upon my return to school next week...just contact me and I'll get it done...

*BaseClogger*
04-03-2008, 10:04 PM
:jump:

Bob Borkowski
04-03-2008, 11:18 PM
Wow, great opening effort.

And we old-timers notice that he wears the uniform number (47) of one of the Reds top pitchers ever...Ewell (The Whip) Blackwell.

Superdude
04-03-2008, 11:18 PM
FWIW, if anyone would like a copy of the game, I did record it and would be happy to make a copy onto DVD upon my return to school next week...just contact me and I'll get it done...

I'd like one. Let me know when you make some.

redsfan4445
04-03-2008, 11:18 PM
i just watched the highlites and i was like WOW and had a huge smile on my face :).. this could be a fun year people!!! and i cant wait till Sunday when Volquez pitches!! im going to the game now!!

redsfaninbsg
04-03-2008, 11:26 PM
One can only dream about how good the Reds would be if Cueto, Volquez, and Bailey all lived up to their potential.

Screwball
04-03-2008, 11:28 PM
i just watched the highlites and i was like WOW and had a huge smile on my face :).. this could be a fun year people!!! and i cant wait till Sunday when Volquez pitches!! im going to the game now!!

Yeah I just saw the highlights on Sportscenter as well. His fastball was exploding when it got to the plate, his slider had some nasty bite to it, and he was painting the corners at the knees. I can see the Pedro comparisons now - that type of stuff with that kind of command just isn't fair. Not to mention he oozes confidence.

Cueto's an absolute beast.

Topcat
04-03-2008, 11:28 PM
They said Cueto was pitchin at 96 deep into the game. Yikes:eek:, This is just another reason I say let Homer progress then we will have 2 of these sick pitchers on our Reds! These are not your normal kids folks!

reds44
04-03-2008, 11:30 PM
They said Cueto was pitchin at 96 deep into the game. Yikes:eek:, This is just another reason I say let Homer progress then we will have 2 of these sick pitchers on our Reds! These are not your normal kids folks!
Three.

Homer's got issues right now, though.

Caseyfan21
04-03-2008, 11:35 PM
A little friendly competition between the two kids is a very healthy thing, IMO.

Exactly my thoughts. If these two can go at each other and compete I can only see them both benefiting. It's always nice to be surrounded by great players, it just makes everyone better.

red-in-la
04-03-2008, 11:38 PM
They said Cueto was pitchin at 96 deep into the game. Yikes:eek:, This is just another reason I say let Homer progress then we will have 2 of these sick pitchers on our Reds! These are not your normal kids folks!

I'm not sure hpw you could watch Cueto today and hold this opinion about Bailey. Cueto was only filthy because he had command of the stiuff he was throwing.

Bailey is the anti-Cueto. He throws hard but he misses most of the time. If you throw belt high, middle of the plate straight 96 mph fastballs to ML hitters for any length of time, you are going to get crushed.

Cueto hit black corners at the knees with 96 mph stuff.

You see in Cueto what Bailey can BECOME if he gets control.

Cedric
04-03-2008, 11:39 PM
FWIW, if anyone would like a copy of the game, I did record it and would be happy to make a copy onto DVD upon my return to school next week...just contact me and I'll get it done...

Would love it. PM me for email or email me if you want.

Cedric
04-03-2008, 11:41 PM
I'm not sure hpw you could watch Cueto today and hold this opinion about Bailey. Cueto was only filthy because he had command of the stiuff he was throwing.

Bailey is the anti-Cueto. He throws hard but he misses most of the time. If you throw belt high, middle of the plate straight 96 mph fastballs to ML hitters for any length of time, you are going to get crushed.

Cueto hit black corners at the knees with 96 mph stuff.

You see in Cueto what Bailey can BECOME if he gets control.
He said let Homer progress.
This is the problem with what Krivsky/Castellini did with Homer last year. He is 21 years old and he is a complete power pitcher. He doesn't have the incredible feel for the strike zone that Cueto has. He is going to be fine and I bet after watching Cueto and hopefully Volquez he turns it up a notch. Homer is a great competitor and he just needs some confidence. From all accounts he pounded the zone today and hopefully will continue.

OnBaseMachine
04-04-2008, 12:34 AM
FWIW, if anyone would like a copy of the game, I did record it and would be happy to make a copy onto DVD upon my return to school next week...just contact me and I'll get it done...

I'd love one too. I emailed you in case you didn't see this.

SteelSD
04-04-2008, 12:57 AM
Impressive. Cueto's command was exceptional. Late movement even at high velocity and his slider was simply filthy.

Cueto didn't remind me of a young Pedro tonight. He reminded me of a young Jose Rijo.

I'm extremely impressed that Cueto can actually work effectively at 94-96 MPH. That's a velocity claimed by many scouting reports for pitching prospects, but Cueto actually worked in that range. Couple that with a hard slider at @88 MPH and you have a potentially legit power pitcher. He'll have his struggles as will most, if not all, young pitchers but the arsenal is there.

Really nice to see.

RFS62
04-04-2008, 01:01 AM
I can't get over how well he kept the ball down in the zone. And he went after every batter.

It was a beautiful thing to see.

OnBaseMachine
04-04-2008, 01:05 AM
Cueto didn't remind me of a young Pedro tonight. He reminded me of a young Jose Rijo.


Even pitches like him, i.e. same type of arm motion and delivery.

Stormy
04-04-2008, 01:10 AM
I'm extremely impressed that Cueto can actually work effectively at 94-96 MPH.

Effectively, and seemingly effortlessly. His delivery was as smooth, fluid and compact when he was touching 95mph in the 6th inning, as it was in the first. How a youngster resists the temptation to overthrow at any juncture in his closely contested debut is beyond me. I'm sure avoiding the stretch lightened his labors some today, but man he was filthy and almost untouchable. There were entire collections of innings where not a single D'Back even managed a good swing, much less put good contact on the ball.

He has a dream arsenal, and when his command and composure are what they were today, it makes him virtually unhittable. Great game called by Bako, too, and even better execution of that gameplan by Cueto.

RedEye
04-04-2008, 01:14 AM
Anyone know how Cueto's mechanics stack up in terms of injury risk?

I've heard people describe his delivery as "compact," but I'm not quite sure what that means in terms of long-term health. With recent flamethrowers like Liriano, Harden and Kazmir getting injured all the time, I just get the feeling that working 94-96 isn't always that safe--or that perhaps a guy just doesn't have much margin for error when he's flinging himself like that 100 times every five days. I'm hopeful Johnny will be healthy, but the pessimist in me does worry a bit about those dark clouds that hang over precocious 22 year-old hurlers.

Any thoughts?

WVRedsFan
04-04-2008, 01:17 AM
Wish I could have seen it. Since I already have EI, XM, and cable, it just sems like a waste of money to have the MLB TV package, but it would have been nice to see the game at work today.

I'll take the word of those who saw it. It must have been a gem.

HumnHilghtFreel
04-04-2008, 01:25 AM
Anyone know how Cueto's mechanics stack up in terms of injury risk?

I've heard people describe his delivery as "compact," but I'm not quite sure what that means in terms of long-term health. With recent flamethrowers like Liriano, Harden and Kazmir getting injured all the time, I just get the feeling that working 94-96 isn't always that safe--or that perhaps a guy just doesn't have much margin for error when he's flinging himself like that 100 times every five days. I'm hopeful Johnny will be healthy, but the pessimist in me does worry a bit about those dark clouds that hang over precocious 22 year-old hurlers.

Any thoughts?

From what I saw, it seemed that a lot of his power comes from the rest of his body rather than throwing all arm. He really comes off the mound after each pitch.

red-in-la
04-04-2008, 02:34 AM
Impressive. Cueto's command was exceptional. Late movement even at high velocity and his slider was simply filthy.

Cueto didn't remind me of a young Pedro tonight. He reminded me of a young Jose Rijo.

I'm extremely impressed that Cueto can actually work effectively at 94-96 MPH. That's a velocity claimed by many scouting reports for pitching prospects, but Cueto actually worked in that range. Couple that with a hard slider at @88 MPH and you have a potentially legit power pitcher. He'll have his struggles as will most, if not all, young pitchers but the arsenal is there.

Really nice to see.

I am not sure that Rijo ever threw that hard......although I could be wrong.....how young? In 1990, he was hitting 92 mph but not 96. Maybe he threw much harder when he was young and I just never knew about it.

Rijo had a really, really nasty slider though.....and I am not sure Cueto is on his category.

I remember the Pedro with Montreal throwing very much like I saw Cueto today. Hard low stuff and a hard change.

fearofpopvol1
04-04-2008, 02:55 AM
I could be wrong, but I always thought Rijo topped out at 94.

westofyou
04-04-2008, 10:20 AM
Nice game... not exactly Bumpus Jones, but still very nice.

Caveat Emperor
04-04-2008, 01:45 PM
He'll have his struggles as will most, if not all, young pitchers but the arsenal is there.

Cannot be emphasized enough.

Cueto is going to get hit. There are night where he is going to be hit hard. Once hitters around the league see some film of him (or see him in person once or twice), they'll make adjustments to what he is doing.

He'll have to do what all young pitchers must to be successful -- learn and adapt. With his stuff, though, adaptation shouldn't be a major problem.

He'll have nights like this, and he'll have nights to forget -- but if the good outweighs the bad and learns from it, it'll have been a highly productive 2008.

Matt700wlw
04-04-2008, 02:36 PM
Fay:

A little more on Cueto

In the clubhouse after the game, Kent Mercker called me over and asked:

"When's the last time the Reds had anyone deal like this?"

Me: "A homegrown player? Mario Soto."

Merck: "No, anyone."

Me: "Jose Rijo, maybe."

Merck: "I don't think he threw that hard. He had that nasty slider."

Me: "This kid's pretty good, eh?"

Merck: "You know what, Volquez is just as good."

That would be Edinson Volquez. He makes his Reds' debut Sunday v. Philadelphia.

Reader John Perin sent this to me: With regards to Johnny Cueto's first-time appearance, here is some information on two other Reds' pitchers and their major-league debuts:

Gary Nolan - April 15, 1967. Went 7.1 innings, gave up six hits, three runs, struck out eight and walked two against Houston at Crosley Field. The Reds won 7-3. In that game, Nolan struck out the side in the first inning, walking only Joe Morgan around the three strikeouts.

Wayne Simpson - April 9, 1970 - Went nine innings, gave up two hits, no runs and no walks and struck out two against Los Angeles at Dodger Stadium. The Reds won 3-0.

Matt700wlw
04-04-2008, 03:40 PM
Another note from Fay:

According to Elias, he was the first pitcher in modern history to debute with 10 strikeouts and no walks. He was only the third pitcher in history to record at least 10 strikeouts and allow only one hit in his debut. Steve Woddard (1997) and Juan Marichal (1960) are the others

fearofpopvol1
04-04-2008, 07:42 PM
Cueto was the #1 topic on Oddsmakers on PTI today.

The question was: Will Johnny Cueto be the next big thing in baseball?

Tony said a 14% chance, Wilbon said a 20% chance.

Tony's reasoning was that he was old enough to remember Vaughn McDaniel, Mark Fidrych and David Clyde who all had spectacular debuts and flamed out.

Wilbon's reasoning was he remembered another Red by the name of Wayne Simpson who had an amazing debut and then finished his career with 14-3 his 1st season with a 3.00 ERA in 176 innings at 21 while finishing his career with a 22-28 record

Tommyjohn25
04-04-2008, 07:45 PM
Cueto was the #1 topic on Oddsmakers on PTI today.

The question was: Will Johnny Cueto be the next big thing in baseball?

Tony said a 14% chance, Wilbon said a 20% chance.

Tony's reasoning was that he was old enough to remember Vaughn McDaniel, Mark Fidrych and David Clyde who all had spectacular debuts and flamed out.

Wilbon's reasoning was he remembered another Red by the name of Wayne Simpson who had an amazing debut and then finished his career with 14-3 his 1st season with a 3.00 ERA in 176 innings at 21 while finishing his career with a 22-28 record


I say the odds are 100% that if Cueto pitched for the Mets, Yankees, Red Sox, or Cubs, he would have been an overwhelming favorite for "next big thing". :rolleyes:

fearofpopvol1
04-04-2008, 07:50 PM
Hey, to be honest, I'm surprised they even said anything about him at all! I thought, for ESPN, that was impressive in of itself.

Spring~Fields
04-04-2008, 08:00 PM
I can't wait until he pitches again, the guy is impressive.

OnBaseMachine
04-04-2008, 08:12 PM
Now it’s E.V.’s turn

By Hal McCoy | Friday, April 4, 2008, 10:46 AM

As Johnny K-ueto (with credit to Ohdave) used a 96 miles an hour scythe on the Arizona Diamondbacks en route to 10 strikeouts, the Arizona scribes sat in their second row seats of the Great American Ball Park press box completely mesmerized.

“Who is this guy?”

“Where have they been hiding this kid?”

Eventually, I turned to veteran writer Jack Magruder of the East Valley Tribune and said, “Wait until you see Edinson Volquez?”

He said he had heard good things about Volquez, more than about Cueto.

That’s because if you look at spring training statistics you will see that Cueto’s ERA was 5.09 and that he walked 12 in 16 innings. Volquez had a 2.70 ERA, walking four in 20 inniungs while striking out 26. Cueto struck out 19.

The different was subpar Cueto starts in his last two spring training exhibitions, including one game in which he walked five in the first inning.

Manager Dusty Baker said he believes it was because Cueto thought he was still trying to make the team and was anxious and overthrowing.

“Once he knew he was on the team, he relaxed and was himself,” said Baker. There certainly weren’t enough fans on the gloomy, drizzly day to make him nervous. There weren’t enough in the stands to start a good bar brawl.

But if Cueto continues to pitch the way he did Thursday, eventually 134,000 people will say they were in the seats to witness. That’s what Tom Browning always says about his perfect game: “If everybody who told me they were at that game were actually there, they would have had a half-million fans stuffed into Riverfront,” he said.

Volquez gets his start Sunday against the Phillies, with one advantage eradicated. The D-Backs, who train in Arizona, had never seen Cueto, except those who played in the Class A Midwest League for the South Bend Silverhawks when they played the Dayton Dragons.

The Phillies faced Volquez in spring exhibitions.

A word of caution here - and not to be one to toss ice water on the cat. Don’t dive head first overboard on Cueto’s one start.

He is 22. He has very little experience. He will hit bumps and pot holes along the way. Too often all of us have gone cuckoo and ga-ga much too quickly with Reds pitchers.

Can you say Jack Armstrong or Scott Scudder or Ty Howington or Brett Tomko or Ryan Wagner or Chris Gruler or C.J. Nitkowski - or, yes, Homer Bailey?

It was a wow-em debut, extremely enjoyable to witness. He has the stuff to continue doing it, but human foibles sometimes work in strange ways.

But for me, give me a towel and dry off that cat, then I’ll dive overboard. The kid is something and let’s see what Volques does.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/

Bob Borkowski
04-04-2008, 08:31 PM
Wilbon's reasoning was he remembered another Red by the name of Wayne Simpson who had an amazing debut and then finished his career with 14-3 his 1st season with a 3.00 ERA in 176 innings at 21 while finishing his career with a 22-28 record

Simpson was a flame-thrower who developed serious arm problems which shortened his career.

Blitz Dorsey
04-04-2008, 11:03 PM
Now it’s E.V.’s turn

By Hal McCoy | Friday, April 4, 2008, 10:46 AM

As Johnny K-ueto (with credit to Ohdave) used a 96 miles an hour scythe on the Arizona Diamondbacks en route to 10 strikeouts, the Arizona scribes sat in their second row seats of the Great American Ball Park press box completely mesmerized.

“Who is this guy?”

“Where have they been hiding this kid?”

Eventually, I turned to veteran writer Jack Magruder of the East Valley Tribune and said, “Wait until you see Edinson Volquez?”

He said he had heard good things about Volquez, more than about Cueto.

That’s because if you look at spring training statistics you will see that Cueto’s ERA was 5.09 and that he walked 12 in 16 innings. Volquez had a 2.70 ERA, walking four in 20 inniungs while striking out 26. Cueto struck out 19.

The different was subpar Cueto starts in his last two spring training exhibitions, including one game in which he walked five in the first inning.

Manager Dusty Baker said he believes it was because Cueto thought he was still trying to make the team and was anxious and overthrowing.

“Once he knew he was on the team, he relaxed and was himself,” said Baker. There certainly weren’t enough fans on the gloomy, drizzly day to make him nervous. There weren’t enough in the stands to start a good bar brawl.

But if Cueto continues to pitch the way he did Thursday, eventually 134,000 people will say they were in the seats to witness. That’s what Tom Browning always says about his perfect game: “If everybody who told me they were at that game were actually there, they would have had a half-million fans stuffed into Riverfront,” he said.

Volquez gets his start Sunday against the Phillies, with one advantage eradicated. The D-Backs, who train in Arizona, had never seen Cueto, except those who played in the Class A Midwest League for the South Bend Silverhawks when they played the Dayton Dragons.

The Phillies faced Volquez in spring exhibitions.

A word of caution here - and not to be one to toss ice water on the cat. Don’t dive head first overboard on Cueto’s one start.

He is 22. He has very little experience. He will hit bumps and pot holes along the way. Too often all of us have gone cuckoo and ga-ga much too quickly with Reds pitchers.

Can you say Jack Armstrong or Scott Scudder or Ty Howington or Brett Tomko or Ryan Wagner or Chris Gruler or C.J. Nitkowski - or, yes, Homer Bailey?

It was a wow-em debut, extremely enjoyable to witness. He has the stuff to continue doing it, but human foibles sometimes work in strange ways.

But for me, give me a towel and dry off that cat, then I’ll dive overboard. The kid is something and let’s see what Volques does.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/

I love Hal, but he lost me with this story. He is mentioning Cueto's name in the same sentence with scrubs of grand preportions. No one was excited about Chris Gruler. He was the No. 3 overall pick of the draft because he was signable. And then he blew out his arm almost immediately. Don't see the corrolation there with Cueto.

I understand what he means by Reds pitchers who have had impressive debuts. But Gruler, Howington etc, don't belong in the discussion. We're not talking about first-round busts who blew out their arms. We're talking about whether Cueto's first start indicates that he will be a stud long term. And I think it does.

Jpup
04-05-2008, 04:33 AM
....I think he's ready now. :)

sonny
04-05-2008, 09:28 AM
It would be hard for EV to outdo Cueto in his Reds debut. But it'll be fun to watch him try. One of the reasons the Beatles were so good was Paul and John tried to outdo each other in terms of songwriting. Lets hope we see the same kind of success from these two studs, and pray Yoko stays far away.

RedEye
04-05-2008, 12:52 PM
Can you say Jack Armstrong or Scott Scudder or Ty Howington or Brett Tomko or Ryan Wagner or Chris Gruler or C.J. Nitkowski - or, yes, Homer Bailey?

I think Armstrong and Tomko might be fair comparisons... maybe even Bailey. But Scudder, Howington, Wagner, Gruler and Nitkowski? These are reaches.

RedEye
04-05-2008, 12:53 PM
It would be hard for EV to outdo Cueto in his Reds debut. But it'll be fun to watch him try. One of the reasons the Beatles were so good was Paul and John tried to outdo each other in terms of songwriting. Lets hope we see the same kind of success from these two studs, and pray Yoko stays far away.

I wonder what Bronson would say if both Johnny and Edinson started being singer/songwriters?

RedEye
04-05-2008, 12:56 PM
From what I saw, it seemed that a lot of his power comes from the rest of his body rather than throwing all arm. He really comes off the mound after each pitch.

That sounds good. Anyone else got insight on his delivery and what it portends for long-term health?

sonny
04-05-2008, 07:37 PM
I wonder what Bronson would say if both Johnny and Edinson started being singer/songwriters?

I'd like to hear one of them sing John Morrell hotdogs and Reds baseball "They're together again" song.

Aronchis
04-05-2008, 07:47 PM
That sounds good. Anyone else got insight on his delivery and what it portends for long-term health?

Cueto throws a 3-4 slot delivery. I would say his elbow is the biggest worry besides overuse. But he throws it clean enough, you shouldn't worry on any major structural damage over the next few years.

pedro
04-05-2008, 08:15 PM
I think Armstrong and Tomko might be fair comparisons... maybe even Bailey. But Scudder, Howington, Wagner, Gruler and Nitkowski? These are reaches.

To my recollection Scudder was a much more highly regarded minor leaguer than Armstrong.

mth123
04-05-2008, 08:20 PM
I'd like to hear one of them sing John Morrell hotdogs and Reds baseball "They're together again" song.

I could go for anyone else singing it. Its offensive to my ears when Arroyo sings it.