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View Full Version : Speed and Its Effects - fascinating article



RedlegJake
04-22-2008, 10:59 AM
http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/article/how-fast-should-a-fastball-be/

I'm not going to paste this article because it has graphs, it's too long and I'm not sure but that would be breaking the rules but the link is above.

This is not hardcore stat anlysis but a fascinating look at how speed affects a pitcher's effectiveness. There are a couple of fascinating suppositions - in the right zone an 86 mph fastball is just as effective as a 96 mph heater. Unless a guy throws upper 90s as in 97-98 there doesn't appear to be much difference IN THE LOW ZONES, especially the outside corner. Fastballs improve a pitcher's effectiveness as they rise but their overall value decreases, too. Meaning in the center of the zone a 96 mph heater is markedly better than a 86 mph pitch but still a poor pitch in relation to runs above average. Also, the finding that fastballs receive MORE ball calls when actually in the strike zone per PitchF/x increasing in ball called rate as the velocity increases. - Hence Volquez at 97 on the lower corner will get more balls called there than Arroyo at 86. Possibly a reason young fireballers have more command issues - umps tend to be calling more balls when they ARE in the zone. Found it fascinating. Hope others do too.

Sea Ray
04-22-2008, 12:04 PM
I wonder when we'll get PitchF/x for FSN Reds broadcasts? We always have to be the last to get technology. I'd love to have seen it during Hunter Wendelstat's last game.

Is PitchF/x adjusted for each hitter or is the box the same size for Adam Dunn and Ryan Freel?

OldRightHander
04-22-2008, 12:11 PM
That was very interesting. I wonder why the faster pitches get more ball calls though. Could it be that the ump has a harder time picking up the location of the faster pitch, or is there some perception that hard throwers aren't as accurate so they're less likely to get the benefit of the doubt on a close pitch?

jojo
04-22-2008, 12:12 PM
It's a great article and I've become a John Walsh groupie over the last year or so.

Technically, it's velocity.... :pimp:

Highlifeman21
04-22-2008, 12:21 PM
Based on the title of the thread, I thought this was going to be about red Sudafed, and how too much of it over the counter can be bad for you...

klw
04-22-2008, 12:26 PM
Based on the title of the thread, I thought this was going to be about red Sudafed, and how too much of it over the counter can be bad for you...

I was picturing a young Helen Hunt jumping off a school gym roof in an old afterschool special.

BCubb2003
04-22-2008, 12:34 PM
I thought it was about the search for the "prototypical lead-off hitter."

Team Clark
04-22-2008, 12:55 PM
That was very interesting. I wonder why the faster pitches get more ball calls though. Could it be that the ump has a harder time picking up the location of the faster pitch, or is there some perception that hard throwers aren't as accurate so they're less likely to get the benefit of the doubt on a close pitch?

I have always believed that. Always. As a catcher I noticed that from time to time as I progressed from level to level. Coaches would say the ump was "flinching" behind me. I always made sure to frame up the pitches and hold them in the zone to help an ump out.

RedlegJake
04-22-2008, 12:57 PM
Yeah, the title could have been more accurate...sorry guys.

BCubb2003
04-22-2008, 01:01 PM
Yeah, the title could have been more accurate...sorry guys.

No problem. It was a good find.

dougdirt
04-22-2008, 01:25 PM
Is PitchF/x adjusted for each hitter or is the box the same size for Adam Dunn and Ryan Freel?

It is adjusted for each batter, and not even for each player. If a player is standing a little different in an at bat, it will note it in the strikezone numbers.