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View Full Version : FSL - Pitcher's League. Why?



Spazzrico
04-28-2008, 09:40 PM
I've really enjoyed reading the Minor League threads, but I've got a question to help clear up my ignorance. I often see that you guys refer to the FSL as a pitcher's league that can deflate the numbers of otherwise strong players. So the question is, why is it a pitcher's league. Do they consistently have good pitchers? If so why? Is it climate? Are the parks larger than the norm? I'm just curious and would like to learn more.

dougdirt
04-28-2008, 09:46 PM
I've really enjoyed reading the Minor League threads, but I've got a question to help clear up my ignorance. I often see that you guys refer to the FSL as a pitcher's league that can deflate the numbers of otherwise strong players. So the question is, why is it a pitcher's league. Do they consistently have good pitchers? If so why? Is it climate? Are the parks larger than the norm? I'm just curious and would like to learn more.

Climate and large ballparks for the most part. There are a few hitters parks sprinkled in the league, but for the most part the parks play as pitchers parks.

roborobj
04-28-2008, 11:03 PM
Climate plays a bid part in it. The more the humidity, the more movement in the ball the pitcher isi throwing. That's why they call it a sluggers league in the California league. It's much harder for the pitcher to get the ball to move in the arid climate. It's also much different in the mountain areas like Colorado.

TOBTTReds
04-28-2008, 11:59 PM
Just a guess, but I bet position players wear down from the 90 degree heat every day.

IslandRed
04-29-2008, 10:16 AM
The muggy sea-level air also shortens up fly balls. Combined with the larger ballparks, it has a major power-sapping effect. It's mostly slugging percentage that goes up when a hitter advances out of the FSL to Double-A.

bucksfan2
04-29-2008, 10:40 AM
Climate plays a bid part in it. The more the humidity, the more movement in the ball the pitcher isi throwing. That's why they call it a sluggers league in the California league. It's much harder for the pitcher to get the ball to move in the arid climate. It's also much different in the mountain areas like Colorado.

Then please explain this to me. Why when the weather heats up and the humidity spikes in Cincy do the balls fly out of the park?

roborobj
04-29-2008, 11:02 AM
Then please explain this to me. Why when the weather heats up and the humidity spikes in Cincy do the balls fly out of the park?

That's why pitching is an art. When the pitcher makes a mistake, a good hitter will take advantage and hit the ball out of the park.

bucksfan2
04-29-2008, 11:17 AM
That's why pitching is an art. When the pitcher makes a mistake, a good hitter will take advantage and hit the ball out of the park.

But not so much. You will hear a lot of people say this time of year "In the summer" or "when the weather warms up" thats a home run.

SarasotaFan
04-29-2008, 12:05 PM
Then please explain this to me. Why when the weather heats up and the humidity spikes in Cincy do the balls fly out of the park?
let's not forget the way the stadium is designed with the opening's behind home place creating a slight gust towards the outfield

Hoosier Red
04-29-2008, 12:20 PM
No Bucks Fan is right, Fulton County and Riverfront in particular were launching pads "when the weather got warm"

IslandRed
04-29-2008, 01:38 PM
All things considered:

Warm baseballs fly farther than cold ones
Baseballs fly farther in warm air than cold air
Baseballs fly farther in dry air than moist air
Baseballs fly farther in thinner air (i.e. elevation) than thicker air

Remember the whole humidor flap at Coors Field; by storing the balls in a more humid environment than Denver's normal air, they were actually reducing ball flight.

As for the FSL, it's obviously warm there but the sea-level elevation and the humidity serve to cancel it out, which leaves the bigger ballparks filled with young players whose power isn't fully developed.