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OldRightHander
05-10-2008, 10:46 PM
I've been hanging out in Vegas since Thursday night, waiting for Monday when I'll probably get a load out, and today I decided to go over to Hoover Dam. After quite a bit of walking and picture taking, I was ready to go and get some lunch. I noticed on the map that there was a park with a picnic area in Boulder City, so I stopped at a grocery there and got some meat and charcoal. I went over to the park and found a picnic table with a grill and set about cooking my food for the upcoming week. After cooking and sitting there to eat my lunch, it was getting quite warm out and I elected to go back to my van and sit in the AC for a while. I was pretty relaxed, looking out at the mountains and listening to XM, basically just chilling out, and I decided that I would just stay there for the rest of the day instead of going back to the truck stop right away.

That's when things got interesting. This park was quite busy today. There is one of those splash areas where kids can run around with water being sprayed on them from various fountains and it seemed like everyone but me was there with kids. I noticed one particular woman walk by my van at least three or four times and finally she walked over by my window. I put my window down and she looked at me and said, "You're making us nervous." I asked how and she said, "We're protective of our kids, and you've been sitting here for a while. It's making people nervous." I told her that I'm stuck here until Monday and I'm getting tired of sitting in truck stops and she just kept coming back and saying that I was making people nervous.

Help me out here folks. Is a man sitting in a commercial vehicle in a public park somehow a threat to children? Do predators sit in vans in the middle of the day in parks trying to figure out how to get at the kids, while all the parents are present? Would it have been any different if I had been in a car? The way I see it, I have every right to be in a public park, even if I want to sit in my vehicle and listen to the radio, and I have every right not to be disturbed by overly suspicious morons.

oneupper
05-10-2008, 10:52 PM
I've seen enough TV to understand why the lady was nervous (It's always a guy in a commercial van).

However, once she saw your face...well you had no choice but to kill her.

Unassisted
05-10-2008, 10:58 PM
Welcome to the wonderful world of "security moms." We were so much better off when cable news channels didn't provide breathless 24x7 coverage of every child abduction in the US.

I don't know how it is in Nevada, but if you were here in Texas, the mom might be packing a sidearm in her purse, so you probably shouldn't ignore her.

MWM
05-10-2008, 11:26 PM
Nothing personal, ORH, but I would have probably been a little leary myself. It's just the world we live in.

GoReds33
05-10-2008, 11:52 PM
I understand what she's saying. As oneupper pointed out, it's always a dude in a van. I would be a bit suspicous of somebody by themselves in a park with a bunch of kids.

Raisor
05-11-2008, 12:13 AM
If the people I knew were in their commercial vans hanging out near a bunch of kids, yeah, I'd be nervous too.

Cyclone792
05-11-2008, 03:04 AM
"Don't go there,"
I heard her say.
"You can't stomach what you're gonna see."
It's down there by the waters edge,
Wasted and bloated and waiting for someone else.

Funny how,
These things come about.
When you're tied to the teeth and mouth,
The sound of fury,
A shot of pain.
There was no real reason,
No gain.

I can't go down to the water's edge,
I didn't do it,
I saw who did.
Don't go down to the waters edge,
They did it once and they can do it again.

It ain't no secret to me,
How she got there down by the stream.
Cause I'd seen her a minute before,
The van pulled up and opened the door. (oh my love)

I can't say a single word,
About what I saw of her.
Cause her killers,
They got their friends,
In familiar places,
I tell you man!

I can't go down to the water's edge,
I didn't do it,
I saw who did.
Don't go down to the waters edge,
They did it once and they can do it again.

This ain't no ... game.
And I'm feeling so ashamed,
Cause I didn't do anything.
No I didn't do anything,
-to stop,
-to stop,
-to stop,
-to stop,
This from,
HAPPENING.
I did not do,
ANYTHING!

Don't go down to the waters edge you said to me,
I didn't do it but,
I saw who did you see.
Don't go down to the waters edge,
They did it once and they can do it again.

I swear,
I swear,
I swear,
I swear,
I didn't do a thing,
I should have done something

redsmetz
05-11-2008, 02:16 PM
I think you have every right and, these days, folks are often wary of folks just hanging around. It's a sad testament to our world and I'm not sure how to work around it.

Some years ago, when my kids were still young, my wife and I went down to some ballfields near our house and played some whiffle ball with our kids. The whole time we were playing on the field, a guy in a car just sat there and stared ahead. We noticed it, but continued what we were doing and then headed home when we'd finished up.

The next morning we saw in the paper that a guy had been murdered in the park the day we were there. Police were asking for any info from the public, so I called and asked to talk to the detective handling the case. I told him what we'd seen, couldn't really describe the guy since he was parked in the shade, but did describe the car. When I told him the time we were there, he commented that the car fit the description of the victim's car, but it put him in the park earlier than they suspected. I never did hear what became of the case, but it was interesting to give some info in a case like that.

I know that's unrelated to your situation. It's something that you'll probably run into from time to time.

guttle11
05-11-2008, 02:24 PM
You should have just told her you didn't have any gummi bears.

I can see why she would be a bit apprehensive, but to actually come up to you is out of line and not very smart. It's a public park for one, so you have every right to use it's space legally. Second, if I think someone is possibly up to no good, the last thing I'm going to do is approach them.

Falls City Beer
05-11-2008, 03:11 PM
I would have said, "Well, call a police officer, maam."

Push the issue. You have every right on earth to do what you were doing.

JayBruce4HOF
05-11-2008, 03:11 PM
I'd have told her not to worry, none of her kids has the "look" I'm searching for.

RedsManRick
05-11-2008, 03:13 PM
You have every right to be there. They can't make you leave.

They have every to be nervous about it. You can't stop them from being protective of their kids.

The end.

Falls City Beer
05-11-2008, 03:22 PM
You have every right to be there. They can't make you leave.

They have every to be nervous about it. You can't stop them from being protective of their kids.

The end.

But I'm not sure how keen I'd be at someone approaching my car and telling me to go away.

I think the solution is to say, "Call the police." Call this woman's bluff. She knows damn well she can't do anything to you (and if she were truly honest with herself, she's probably not all that afraid of you--public space, many other kids and parents around), but she wants her cake and she wants to eat it too. She wants you to "go away."

Too bad. She can't have it her way. We have rights in this country. I know that hurts people's feelings and everything, but the Constitution does exist.

Ltlabner
05-11-2008, 07:18 PM
But I'm not sure how keen I'd be at someone approaching my car and telling me to go away.

No kidding.

I can understand her being protective of her children, but is she going to approach every person on the planet she thinks looks "fishy" and ask them to stop what they are doing to make her life a little easier? Funny how they have to bugger-off because she's bent out of shape.

A person with common sense who's "6th sense" was bothering them would have simply said, "hey kids lets go over there" and moved away from the area/person that was giving them the heeby-jeebies and put some distance between them.

If she was really *that* worried she should have called the police without even approaching the van. Serriously, if she though ORH was a wild-eyed killer she should have just called in the SWAT team. Who died and left her saftey-monitor?

I'm with FCB on this. I can understand being protective but this woman is a bit overboard.

Johnny Footstool
05-11-2008, 09:33 PM
"If I'm making you nervous by sitting in a public place, then you should probably go home."

SunDeck
05-11-2008, 09:38 PM
I think she was hitting on you ORH.

OldRightHander
05-11-2008, 09:39 PM
Here's the thing that gets me. Those of you who have met me know how threatening I appear. Here's the van I drive. Does this look like a suspicious vehicle?

Raisor
05-11-2008, 09:46 PM
Here's the thing that gets me. Those of you who have met me know how threatening I appear. Here's the van I drive. Does this look like a suspicious vehicle?



It looks like a government stakeout vehicle.

You just blew your cover.

Caseyfan21
05-11-2008, 09:57 PM
It looks like a government stakeout vehicle.

You just blew your cover.

Should have told her that.

"Well, ma'am, actually I work for the Division of Homeland Security and we had specific intelligence that indicated this park is being used by terrorists. I have been stationed here to do some surveillance work and keep an eye on the supposed terrorists."

I bet she would have cleared out of the park and left you alone. :laugh:

Cedric
05-11-2008, 11:03 PM
How is it her fault that she HAS to watch Nancy Grace on TRU tv every night?

You are a true jerk ORH! :)

Spring~Fields
05-11-2008, 11:27 PM
Here's the thing that gets me. Those of you who have met me know how threatening I appear. Here's the van I drive. Does this look like a suspicious vehicle?

Maybe those people had previous experiences that caused them to be overly sensitive that we don't know about.

Johnny Footstool
05-12-2008, 12:03 AM
Maybe those people had previous experiences that caused them to be overly sensitive that we don't know about.

If they are indeed that sensitive, they should have left the park themselves rather than trying to force ORH to leave.

Deepred05
05-12-2008, 01:35 AM
nm

Redsfaithful
05-12-2008, 01:41 AM
I maybe could have understood if you were driving this:

http://hunch.se/stuff/free_candy.jpg

But yeah, she is crazy, and you had every right to be there. Don't back down in situations like this, it just encourages the nutters.

cincyinco
05-12-2008, 04:23 AM
Don't back down? I understand what you're saying, but stuff like this is sensitive.

Is it worth the time to possibly even have to talk to the police about why you're there? There's something to be said about picking your battles.

I dunno.. did anyone see the movie "The Brothers Soloman"? Kinda reminds me of the scene in there where they are sitting at the park where kids are playing...

As someone pointed out, I think its more a perceived fear with every kidnapping being brought to you via Nancy Grace, etc. that someone would be in this mindframe. I think its rediculous ORH, but is it worth the fight? In my mind, I dont even want to bother with authorities in the first place, I'd tell this lady to go shove it but then promptly be on my way. I couldn't imagine that being questioned like I was on dateline NBC's "to catch a predator" by the police would be anyone's idea of fun. So I'd think the less time I even spend putting myself in that potential situation, the better.. at least to me. Not that it makes it right, just.. not a battle worth fighting, especially if I'm on the move anyway.

JayBruce4HOF
05-12-2008, 06:14 AM
Don't back down? I understand what you're saying, but stuff like this is sensitive.

Is it worth the time to possibly even have to talk to the police about why you're there? There's something to be said about picking your battles.

I dunno.. did anyone see the movie "The Brothers Soloman"? Kinda reminds me of the scene in there where they are sitting at the park where kids are playing...

As someone pointed out, I think its more a perceived fear with every kidnapping being brought to you via Nancy Grace, etc. that someone would be in this mindframe. I think its rediculous ORH, but is it worth the fight? In my mind, I dont even want to bother with authorities in the first place, I'd tell this lady to go shove it but then promptly be on my way. I couldn't imagine that being questioned like I was on dateline NBC's "to catch a predator" by the police would be anyone's idea of fun. So I'd think the less time I even spend putting myself in that potential situation, the better.. at least to me. Not that it makes it right, just.. not a battle worth fighting, especially if I'm on the move anyway.

Why would you want to make yourself look guilty?

Who cares about talking to the police for 30 seconds? They'll realize she's a complete whack job after about 10 seconds.

OldRightHander
05-12-2008, 07:23 AM
For the record, I didn't leave right away. I stayed until I was ready to leave. I've sat in many parks all over the country and this is the first time anything like this happened. That's one of the reasons I chose to drive a van instead of a larger truck. I like the freedom of being able to hang out at places other than truck stops. It makes a layover more enjoyable and I'm not about to let some overly paranoid person steal that from me.

TeamCasey
05-12-2008, 07:48 AM
A person with common sense who's "6th sense" was bothering them would have simply said, "hey kids lets go over there" and moved away from the area/person that was giving them the heeby-jeebies and put some distance between them.

That's what I would have done. If creepy ORH ;) still gave me the heebies jeebies, I'd bribe the kids into leaving the park to go get an ice cream cone or something.

Falls City Beer
05-12-2008, 09:46 AM
That's what I would have done. If creepy ORH ;) still gave me the heebies jeebies, I'd bribe the kids into leaving the park to go get an ice cream cone or something.

I understand just moving--if you're not feeling confrontational or whatever. The best solution, however, is to go about your business while the other person goes about his. IMO.

This country is a lot less dangerous than most other countries.

Roy Tucker
05-12-2008, 10:20 AM
It's a free country. You've got every right to be there. Depending on my mood, I'd either engage her in a conversation to show her I'm not a nut-job or just tell her to go ahead and call the cops if she is so daggone nervous.

There certainly have been times when we've taken our kids to the park, on a picnic, to the skating rink, etc etc and something about the situation hasn't smelled right. But that's when I revert to German Shepard mode and keep an extremely vigilant eye on the kids and the situation and make it plainly obvious there is a large and capable man watching what's going on.

Most of the time its just my over-active imagination but I'd rather be safe than sorry. If I would truly suspect someone is up to no good, I'd call a cop. The only time I actually have called the cops (actually went to police station) was when we were in Florida and some perv was trying to take phone camera pictures of my daughters trying on bathing suits in a beach shop.

SeeinRed
05-12-2008, 11:35 AM
It's a free country. You've got every right to be there. Depending on my mood, I'd either engage her in a conversation to show her I'm not a nut-job or just tell her to go ahead and call the cops if she is so daggone nervous.

There certainly have been times when we've taken our kids to the park, on a picnic, to the skating rink, etc etc and something about the situation hasn't smelled right. But that's when I revert to German Shepard mode and keep an extremely vigilant eye on the kids and the situation and make it plainly obvious there is a large and capable man watching what's going on.

Most of the time its just my over-active imagination but I'd rather be safe than sorry. If I would truly suspect someone is up to no good, I'd call a cop. The only time I actually have called the cops (actually went to police station) was when we were in Florida and some perv was trying to take phone camera pictures of my daughters trying on bathing suits in a beach shop.

This is exactly how it should be.

There is a lot to be said for watching your own children. I hate the people who are overly sensitive about safety. For your children, I understand worrying constantly even though I have none. I can't imagine what it would be like to constantly worry about their safety, but there is a point at which you have to understand you are being overly protective. How many children are kidnapped or lured by kidnappers when their parents are paying any attention at all. I would say close to none.

So, I'm not allowed to enjoy a day at a park because I don't have any children? Thats just as discrimitive as thinking all people of middle eastern appearance are terrorists.

I'm not saying you shouldn't keep an eye out for things that might be indicators of something criminal. I'm just saying that when you get that bad feeling, you avoid any contact with that person, and you have the responsibility of getting you kids away from what you feel as a threat, not taking it upon yourself to decide who is a bad person and immediately assume you are in the right. Those are the people who drive me nuts. The ones who assume they are right, and if they aren't you shouldn't have been there anyway. Luckily, there are few people out there who act this irrational, but everyone knows somebody like that.

Falls City Beer
05-12-2008, 12:52 PM
This is exactly how it should be.

There is a lot to be said for watching your own children. I hate the people who are overly sensitive about safety. For your children, I understand worrying constantly even though I have none. I can't imagine what it would be like to constantly worry about their safety, but there is a point at which you have to understand you are being overly protective. How many children are kidnapped or lured by kidnappers when their parents are paying any attention at all. I would say close to none.

So, I'm not allowed to enjoy a day at a park because I don't have any children? Thats just as discrimitive as thinking all people of middle eastern appearance are terrorists.

I'm not saying you shouldn't keep an eye out for things that might be indicators of something criminal. I'm just saying that when you get that bad feeling, you avoid any contact with that person, and you have the responsibility of getting you kids away from what you feel as a threat, not taking it upon yourself to decide who is a bad person and immediately assume you are in the right. Those are the people who drive me nuts. The ones who assume they are right, and if they aren't you shouldn't have been there anyway. Luckily, there are few people out there who act this irrational, but everyone knows somebody like that.

Great post.

Even though I am a parent, I deeply dislike how some folks treat others without children like second-class citizens. It's definitely a phenomenon in this country, and it sickens me.

flyer85
05-12-2008, 01:04 PM
you should have asked her if she wanted some candy.

Dom Heffner
05-12-2008, 08:11 PM
If I'm the parents, I watch you like a hawk, just as I would watch everyone.

Never in a million years would I walk up and tell you I thought you were suspicious.

Unassisted
05-12-2008, 08:29 PM
This news story made me think of this thread.


http://imgsrv.wbz.com/image/DbGraphic/200805/938613.jpg
Suspicious incident on-board MBTA bus resolved

Boston, MA (WBZ Newsroom) -- Transit police have identified the man seen with a young girl on-board a bus at Sullivan Station Sunday night.

Officers have met with both the young girl, and the family member who was with her on the bus.

A passenger noticed a man holding the child's hand. That passenger says she overheard the girl say she was hungry, and the man told her to "Please be quiet."

T police say there was no criminal conduct. They consider the case closed.

The man (pictured, with the girl) was a "family member," probably the father but maybe a different relative. He held his daughter's hand on the bus and told her to be quiet when she was complaining about being hungry. For this, he's investigated. The blogger who discussed this story said apparently the guy was guilty of "parenting while male." :doh:

TeamSelig
05-13-2008, 01:36 AM
Hmm... do you have a "pedosmile"?

http://www.thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=spot_the_pedo

Reds Nd2
05-16-2008, 12:45 AM
Here's the van I drive. Does this look like a suspicious vehicle?

Well, it is a pretty non-descript vehicle and it doesn't really look "commercial" at all. It would definantly raise my threat assessment level from blue to red if I saw a male sitting behind the wheel, in an area with full view of a kiddies water park, while he had the engine running. Especially for the time frame you are alluding to. Just saying...

Team Clark
05-16-2008, 10:32 AM
I would have said, "Well, call a police officer, maam."

Push the issue. You have every right on earth to do what you were doing.

Not a bad idea. Either she would have been embarassed and left or the police officer would have taken a field card with your info and everything would have been ok.

Chip R
05-16-2008, 10:42 AM
Not a bad idea. Either she would have been embarassed and left or the police officer would have taken a field card with your info and everything would have been ok.


Or he could have gone all Barney Fife on him because he resembles one of the wanted posters they have back at the station or because he thought he may have been what that woman thought he was. Everybody's so skittish these days so involving a cop may not have the benefits you would think it has.

OldRightHander
05-16-2008, 11:01 AM
Well, it is a pretty non-descript vehicle and it doesn't really look "commercial" at all.

That's pretty funny considering that most of the Sprinters sold are for commercial use. Sure, I use it as my personal vehicle while I'm home, but not many folks buy these for strictly personal use. I saw one converted to a small RV the other day though.

RichRed
05-16-2008, 11:26 AM
That's pretty funny considering that most of the Sprinters sold are for commercial use. Sure, I use it as my personal vehicle while I'm home, but not many folks buy these for strictly personal use. I saw one converted to a small RV the other day though.

I think the point is though, ORH, that most people who are not in your line of work expect to see some kind of identification on a commercial truck: a company name, "How is my driving?" sticker, etc.

I'm not saying it was appropriate for the woman to approach you (it wasn't), but I suppose I can see it raising an eyebrow or two.

Unassisted
05-16-2008, 11:53 AM
I think the point is though, ORH, that most people who are not in your line of work expect to see some kind of identification on a commercial truck: a company name, "How is my driving?" sticker, etc.
I think putting the word "Surveillance" as large as possible on the side panels would cut down on questions about why ORH is in the park. ;)

OldRightHander
05-16-2008, 12:09 PM
I think the point is though, ORH, that most people who are not in your line of work expect to see some kind of identification on a commercial truck: a company name, "How is my driving?" sticker, etc.

I'm not saying it was appropriate for the woman to approach you (it wasn't), but I suppose I can see it raising an eyebrow or two.

Actually, I have magnetic signs on the side with my name, MC and DOT numbers, and my phone number. That photo was taken right after I bought the van last year when I didn't have those signs. This van is identified as a commercial vehicle rather clearly.

M2
05-16-2008, 12:27 PM
My guess it was the sitting in the van part that weirded the women. Had you been in a lawn chair, reading a book, they probably wouldn't have had the same reaction. Staying inside the van while it's running (I assume you've got to keep it running to work the a/c), probably came across as overly furtive behavior to them.

The commercial ID is probably something they didn't spot. They saw a man inside a running van at the park and it's entirely possible the details escaped them.

So I get the paranoia. That said, I'm with Roy in hoping that a civil conversation could diffuse that situation. In a case like that I figure it pays to be unremittingly civil no matter how rude the paranoid mom gets.

Falls City Beer
05-16-2008, 01:49 PM
I think giving in to busybodies is actually just feeding the problem. I'm guessing the woman would have had an even stronger reaction if ORH were another race or ethnicity; however, she probably would not have been emboldened to approach the van.

Seriously, this woman is the kind of person you stand up to, not back down from. This is a battle to pick and win. She is attempting to class you as a citizen; this is the high school cafeteria all over again. Stand your ground; you're not guilty. No reason to act so.

SeeinRed
05-16-2008, 03:14 PM
I think giving in to busybodies is actually just feeding the problem. I'm guessing the woman would have had an even stronger reaction if ORH were another race or ethnicity; however, she probably would not have been emboldened to approach the van.

Seriously, this woman is the kind of person you stand up to, not back down from. This is a battle to pick and win. She is attempting to class you as a citizen; this is the high school cafeteria all over again. Stand your ground; you're not guilty. No reason to act so.


I definately agree based on one simple thing. The Woman didn't have to take it upon herself to confront him. If she is that worried, call the police and leave. Report suspicious activity. If that happened, I'm not even sure the police would have done anything more than maybe make an appearance at the park to scope things out. Then again, police did separate a kid from his family over Mike's Hard Lemonade. Being observant and being able to determine situations are very good traits. There is a reason there are people paid to take care of situations like this. They are trained to tell the difference between a child abductor and a driver looking for a place to take a nap. The internet/news/investigative reports do not give you the training to be Mr./Mrs. crime fighter. Thats what irks me. These news reports say they can show you how to identify a criminal. They profile them really well probably. The problem is people assume that everyone who fits the profile is a threat.

He was picked out because of nothing other than appearance. Not on behavior as far as I can tell. He wasn't holding candy or being watching the kids intently I assume. Thats the problem appearance is only part of it. That is usually the part that people leave out or skew based on appearance. Maybe ORH looked up because he heard a noise and the woman assumed he was picking a kid to steal. Its profiling. Everyone does it, and its an important part of survival. (i.e. "Hey, theres a big dog, maybe I should pay extra attention to him so I don't get bit") Not everybody just wants to kill the dog because it is big. That is where the problem is, in how she acted upon her suspicions.

M2
05-16-2008, 04:10 PM
I think giving in to busybodies is actually just feeding the problem. I'm guessing the woman would have had an even stronger reaction if ORH were another race or ethnicity; however, she probably would not have been emboldened to approach the van.

Seriously, this woman is the kind of person you stand up to, not back down from. This is a battle to pick and win. She is attempting to class you as a citizen; this is the high school cafeteria all over again. Stand your ground; you're not guilty. No reason to act so.

While I totally agree the woman was a complete snot and that it's reflective of a faux superiority complex, there's a difference between being polite and "giving in."

I assume ORH knew who the better person was after the first sentence out of her mouth. There really is no "win" with that type. She's not getting down off her high horse no matter what sort of eloquent savaging you give her. Seriously, you could channel George Sanders. It wouldn't matter. Plus, being affable and smiling at her while not giving an inch would leave her in an even bigger snit.

cincyinco
05-16-2008, 04:25 PM
Or he could have gone all Barney Fife on him because he resembles one of the wanted posters they have back at the station or because he thought he may have been what that woman thought he was. Everybody's so skittish these days so involving a cop may not have the benefits you would think it has.

Exactly my earlier point. Is it even worth the hassle?

Pick your battles. To me, as outlandish as this woman was, its not worth the battle.

Government knows enough about me, gets enough of money in various taxes, fees, and/or fines each year. I deal with government enough for my tastes as it is. No need to get authorites from out of my home state involved.

OldRightHander
05-16-2008, 10:12 PM
I'm guessing the woman would have had an even stronger reaction if ORH were another race or ethnicity;

That was the case actually, but I didn't really think the fact that she was black was really that important.

George Foster
05-16-2008, 10:20 PM
I think giving in to busybodies is actually just feeding the problem. I'm guessing the woman would have had an even stronger reaction if ORH were another race or ethnicity; however, she probably would not have been emboldened to approach the van.

Seriously, this woman is the kind of person you stand up to, not back down from. This is a battle to pick and win. She is attempting to class you as a citizen; this is the high school cafeteria all over again. Stand your ground; you're not guilty. No reason to act so.

I totally agree. If you gave in to here she would do it again to someone else. I would of told here to call the police and go away...

George Foster
05-16-2008, 10:39 PM
Wy wife just read the post and said something that made me think. This woman could of got mad at you for not leaving and called the cops and said you exposed yourself to her or was masturbating. Who are the cops going to believe? You might have been in Nevada for a few more days than planned.:eek:

If this happens again, I would be proactive and call the cops myself, and say this woman or persons is bothering YOU.

M2
05-16-2008, 10:45 PM
This woman could of got mad at you for not leaving and called the cops and said you exposed yourself to her or was masturbating.

Well, it is technically the month for that (http://sanfranciscoschtuff.com/2008/05/16/13th-annual-national-masturbation-month/).

Reds Nd2
05-16-2008, 11:36 PM
That's pretty funny considering that most of the Sprinters sold are for commercial use. Sure, I use it as my personal vehicle while I'm home, but not many folks buy these for strictly personal use. I saw one converted to a small RV the other day though.

I think you've just explained my concerns quite nicely. Not everyone buys a non-descript van for commercial use.


Actually, I have magnetic signs on the side with my name, MC and DOT numbers, and my phone number. That photo was taken right after I bought the van last year when I didn't have those signs. This van is identified as a commercial vehicle rather clearly.

Well that wasn't the picture you posted, but really, "magnetic signs"? How hard is it to acquire a removable sticker with a fake name, mc, dot, and phone numbers? (It's not that difficult BTW.) You were in Nevada, correct? What state is your van registered in?

OldRightHander
05-17-2008, 09:19 AM
Well that wasn't the picture you posted, but really, "magnetic signs"? How hard is it to acquire a removable sticker with a fake name, mc, dot, and phone numbers? (It's not that difficult BTW.) You were in Nevada, correct? What state is your van registered in?

The van is licensed in Ohio. If it's not hard to make a fake sign, it's also equally easy to verify those numbers with the DOT, which any cop could have done, or any private person for that matter.

For the record, I didn't leave right away. I put my window up and stayed until I was ready to leave. I wasn't bothered again.

WMR
05-17-2008, 09:26 AM
The van is licensed in Ohio. If it's not hard to make a fake sign, it's also equally easy to verify those numbers with the DOT, which any cop could have done, or any private person for that matter.

For the record, I didn't leave right away. I put my window up and stayed until I was ready to leave. I wasn't bothered again.

Good for you ORH.

It's people like this that are contributing to the growing police state in the United States of America.

Reds Nd2
05-17-2008, 11:32 PM
The van is licensed in Ohio. If it's not hard to make a fake sign, it's also equally easy to verify those numbers with the DOT, which any cop could have done, or any private person for that matter.

So the thing is, your basically loitering at a kiddy water park, in a non-descript van with removable decals, the engine running, and you have out of state tags on said vehicle. Ummm yeah', there's no cause for anyone to be suspicious of that.

While it's relatively easy to obtain fake magnetic decals for any vehicle, it's really not that easy for a private person to verify a DOT number. Even a quick google search in the comfort of my own home didn't reveal the info on how do that. I doubt many soccer moms have a number programmed into their cell phones to do that either.

I mean no disrepsect ORH. I don't think you did anything wrong, but I can see where the parents should have cause for concern. Sometimes your own commen sense has to kick in and say "Maybe I shouldn't be here". I wouldn't have approached your vehicle, but I would have called the law in similar circumstances.

919191
05-18-2008, 07:50 AM
Sometimes your own commen sense has to kick in and say "Maybe I shouldn't be here". I wouldn't have approached your vehicle, but I would have called the law in similar circumstances.


Why shouldn't he be there?

Yachtzee
05-18-2008, 10:34 AM
The van is licensed in Ohio. If it's not hard to make a fake sign, it's also equally easy to verify those numbers with the DOT, which any cop could have done, or any private person for that matter.

For the record, I didn't leave right away. I put my window up and stayed until I was ready to leave. I wasn't bothered again.

Maybe you should get a decal for your van identifying your "company." If you're an independent, you can name it whatever you want. So you really want to have some fun, you could put "Mittelos B.S. Expediting" or "Illuminati Transport" on the side. Or how about "Ace Tomato Co.?" "Pinkerton Trucking" with this logo? ;)

http://www.thrillingdetective.com/images/pinkerton_eye.gif

Highlifeman21
05-18-2008, 02:05 PM
Well, it is a pretty non-descript vehicle and it doesn't really look "commercial" at all. It would definantly raise my threat assessment level from blue to red if I saw a male sitting behind the wheel, in an area with full view of a kiddies water park, while he had the engine running. Especially for the time frame you are alluding to. Just saying...

I agree that it doesn't look commercial at all. Some signage on the side would definitely change my feelings about the look.

Plain white van, dude behind the wheel, engine running.... I'd say both parties are justified in 1. concern for the saftey of kids in the area, and 2. ability to enjoy a park and kill some time without being hassled by an overly protective parent.

Highlifeman21
05-18-2008, 02:09 PM
Never mind, I read the rest of the thread, and if your van was marked with signs and DOT numbers and what not, then I would have called the cops and told them Ms. Busy Body was bothering you, and gone all ACLU on her butt.

I can think of only one word to call that lady, and it's not able to be printed here...

Team Clark
05-19-2008, 10:19 AM
Or he could have gone all Barney Fife on him because he resembles one of the wanted posters they have back at the station or because he thought he may have been what that woman thought he was. Everybody's so skittish these days so involving a cop may not have the benefits you would think it has.

Quite possible. Especially if the "Park Police" were called. :rolleyes: I'm glad that ORH stood his ground.