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OnBaseMachine
05-12-2008, 04:35 PM
I won't post the article on here because it's premium stuff but I'll try to summarize it the best I can.

First it starts with Bronson Arroyo talking about Cueto and he compares Cueto's stuff to a young Pedro Martinez. BA agrees and mentions his stuff is similar. There's a quote from Justin Upton saying he faced Cueto two years ago in the minors and says his stuff was great then but even better now. Orlando Hudson says he has Jake Peavy stuff. Bako and Baker said he never gets rattled over anyting despite some recent bumps in the road. Johnny says he was a bit surprised he wasn't called up last September.

Then the article shifts towards Volquez. Volquez says he's older now, and doesn't get upset and is focusing more on pitching rather than throwing. Says he loves it in Cincinnati. Baseball America asked a NL scout who has watched both Cueto and Volquez pitch who he would rather have and he says both. He says both have a chance to be No. 1 pitchers. He says it's hard to find pitchers like that these days and the Reds have two of them and the future of the franchise is bright.

It's a great article. If you have a Baseball America account then I recommend reading the article if you already haven't.

Joseph
05-12-2008, 04:38 PM
Is the article reflective of Cuetos recent struggles, or just heaped with praise from the D'Backs early season problems with him?

OnBaseMachine
05-12-2008, 04:46 PM
Is the article reflective of Cuetos recent struggles, or just heaped with praise from the D'Backs early season problems with him?

It mentions his recent struggles but notes his strong K/BB ratio in that timespan.

OldRightHander
05-12-2008, 05:21 PM
Just imagine the Reds in the post season in a few years with those two as a one two punch. I'm almost giddy thinking about it.

RedEye
05-12-2008, 09:10 PM
Let's hope they can stay healthy. If so, the sky's the limit!

REDREAD
05-13-2008, 10:54 AM
Thanks for taking the time to summarize that article, OnBaseMachine..

Good stuff, and certainly breeds hope for a brighter future down the road.

jmcclain19
05-13-2008, 12:56 PM
Just imagine the Reds in the post season in a few years with those two as a one two punch. I'm almost giddy thinking about it.

Don't forget about Homer

Reds1
05-13-2008, 01:05 PM
Don't forget about Homer

Is amazing how these two guys have made Homer a forgotten man! Which actually might help him in the long run. These 3 with Harang and another good pick up and it could be so sweet.

Keep this hitting up and we can get back into the race in 08. To have young pitchers and Votto, Bruce, EE and the future is bright.

OnBaseMachine
05-13-2008, 02:43 PM
Baseball America also did a recent article on Daryl Thompson where they talked to scouts who have watched him pitch this season. The scout said his fastball is hitting 94 mph and he's showing a solid curveball and changeup and can consistently throw all three for strikes. He also said Thompson could pitch in the major leagues right now...

princeton
05-13-2008, 02:49 PM
Baseball America also did a recent article on Daryl Thompson where they talked to scouts who have watched him pitch this season. The scout said his fastball is hitting 94 mph and he's showing a solid curveball and changeup and can consistently throw all three for strikes. He also said Thompson could pitch in the major leagues right now...


...and get hammered.

maybe he meant that Oil Can Jr would fit right in with the rest of the staff.

OnBaseMachine
05-13-2008, 02:52 PM
FWIW, I don't think the Reds should call up Thompson right now. He needs at least 10 starts in Louisville before I'd consider it. Ideally you would like to see him dominate AAA competition and then maybe give him a couple starts in September.

fearofpopvol1
05-13-2008, 03:03 PM
I don't want to see Thompson up here at all this year. I'd like to see him stay in AA until June and then let him finish in Louisville. Invite him to spring training next year.

OnBaseMachine
05-13-2008, 03:24 PM
Here is another great article with quotes from opposing players. I like reading quotes from opposing players who have faced them because they have a neutral opinion and it really gives you a feel for how good their stuff is.

Touching Base: Edinson Volquez & Johnny Cueto have right stuff in Cincy

BY JESSE SPECTOR
DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

CINCINNATI - Johnny Cueto was the talk of Florida this spring, lighting up radar guns and pitching his way onto the Cincinnati Reds' staff. The buzz he created carried over into the regular season with 10 strikeouts in seven innings of one-hit ball in his major league debut.

Since then, it's been Cueto's teammate, Edinson Volquez, who has made a star turn, having not allowed more than one earned run in any of his seven starts while grabbing the major league lead with 52 strikeouts entering the weekend.

While the Mets will miss Volquez in the three-game series that wraps up Sunday at Shea, they do have to face Cueto Sunday afternoon. It's a challenge that Volquez takes on almost nightly when they return to their shared apartment and fire up the PlayStation.

"Baseball, always," says the 24-year-old Volquez. "I play Boston. (He's the) Yankees. He beats me all the time. I'm not a good player."

In real life, though, both righthanders are very good players. Volquez is 5-1 with a 1.06 ERA, and has 29 strikeouts in his last three starts. Cueto's record and ERA aren't as good at 2-3 and 5.27, but the 22-year-old has 41 strikeouts in 41 innings, with only eight walks.

With lockers right next to each other in the Cincinnati clubhouse, Volquez and Cueto arrive at the ballpark together and are inseparable once they get there.

"It's good," Cueto says through an interpreter. "We get to talk. We know each other from the Dominican and the good thing about it is we pull for each other. Sometimes you find people that don't want you to be good because they want to be good. That's not the case with us. We really pull for each other and try to do our best and help each other out."

Neither one seems to need much help, although Cueto did have a rough stretch of four starts in April when he went 0-3 with a 7.48 ERA.

"There's always something you can learn when you pitch badly, and in the next outing you can take something out of it," says Cueto. "It's a process everybody goes through, having bad outings. But as a young guy, I'm learning from it. I'm brand new, so I'm going to learn."

One concern that the Reds privately have about Cueto is that he is tipping his pitches, but they believe the problem can be quickly solved. In his last start, on Monday, there certainly was no evidence that the Cubs had any idea what was coming. Cueto allowed three runs in six innings with eight strikeouts to earn the win, looking like the pitcher that had the league talking after his debut. Even with the April slump, he's held opponents to a .245 average; the league is hitting .190 against Volquez.

"They're tough," says Pirates outfielder Nate McLouth. "They're similar in stature and look kind of alike, and both have electric stuff. Volquez has the mid-90s fastball and a great changeup. He could probably throw those two pitches alone and be successful."

Says Cubs shortstop Ryan Theriot: "I made the comment in the dugout that (Cueto) could win with one pitch. Just throw his fastball and win with that. You don't see that too often, especially from a guy who's 24."

Theriot is then told that Cueto is only 22.

"Oh jeez. That's pretty scary," says Theriot. "Great mound composure, and just electric stuff."

Similar words and phrases - electric stuff, knows how to pitch, mature - seem to come from the mouths of every player who has faced either starter. Then there's the big one: Pedro. For Pirates first baseman Doug Mientkiewicz, it's Cueto in whom he sees "a mini-Pedro." To Mark DeRosa, who was Volquez's teammate when the righty made his major league debut with the Rangers in 2005, it's he who looks like "a little baby Pedro."

"It's always nice to know that guys think that highly of you, and for a young pitcher, it really boosts your confidence," says Braves pitcher Tim Hudson, the subject of comparisons to Pedro Martinez when he went 11-2 with a 3.23 ERA as a rookie in 1999. "At that stage of your career, that's what you need. You want to know that people believe in you."

That's certainly the case for Volquez, who is in his first full season in the big leagues, but was up with the Rangers each of the last three years, going 3-11 with a 7.20 ERA. Traded to the Reds over the winter for Josh Hamilton (who has paid dividends for Texas as the majors' leading RBI man entering the weekend), Volquez feels good knowing that he won't be going back and forth to the minors.

"I feel more confident," Volquez says. "They gave me the opportunity to be here, and I don't have to worry every time I go out. I might give up a lot of runs one day, but it's just a day I give up a lot of runs. There was an adjustment, too, because I had a problem with my fastball command when I was in Texas, and I worked on that. A lot of work, a lot of work."

Rangers GM Jon Daniels knew how much work Volquez had done - after being sent all the way down to Single-A to rebuild his delivery last spring (similar to what the Blue Jays did with Roy Halladay in 2001), Volquez made it back to the majors in September - but couldn't resist the chance to add a potential 40-home run hitter in the 26-year-old Hamilton.

"We knew we were giving up a pitcher with some upside and ability and in return we were going to get a premium position (player), premium bat that we could build around," Daniels says. "Right now ... both teams have to be happy with the players we received. Josh has made an immediate impact and been one of the most consistent players we have, and Volky's doing a hell of a job over there. I'm happy for him."

While Volquez's talent was known, if unproven, before this season, Cueto had made just four starts above Double-A before dazzling the Reds with 19 strikeouts in 172/3 innings in this year's spring training to earn his spot on the roster.

"Everybody knew he was going to be good," says Mario Soto, a three-time All-Star who pitched for the Reds from 1977-88 and is now the team's director of Dominican operations. "A lot of people are surprised it was that quick, but he loves to pitch, and that's why he's here."

And now that he's here, Cueto has become just the 13th pitcher in the last 50 years to have at least three games with eight or more strikeouts in his first seven career starts - adding his name to a list that includes Hudson, Nolan Ryan and Dwight Gooden.

"It's a good feeling," says Cueto who doesn't seem to know how to respond to such a place in history.

"He's really not paying attention to that because he's still too young to know what's going on," says Reds closer Francisco Cordero, taking a break from translating for the rookie. "He just comes out, tries to pitch well and do his job. I'm sure later on he'll realize that what he's doing is something that nobody just comes out and does - you've got to be special to do it."

That's something the rest of the league knows, even after only seven starts, and something the Mets will find out today at Shea.

"He's good. He's very good. He's got good stuff," says Brewers first baseman Prince Fielder. "He's going to be around for a long time, and it's going to be fun facing him, because he's going to be one of the elite pitchers of the league - he's that good."

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/2008/05/10/2008-05-10_touching_base_edinson_volquez__johnny_cu.html?p age=0