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View Full Version : Members of Russia's Communist Party want the new "Indiana Jones" film banned.



Degenerate39
05-24-2008, 10:02 AM
By Denis Pinchuk
Fri May 23, 4:21 PM ET



ST PETERSBURG, Russia (Reuters) - Russian Communist Party members condemned the new "Indiana Jones" film on Friday as crude, anti-Soviet propaganda that distorts history and called for it to be banned from Russian screens.

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"Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" stars Harrison Ford as an archeologist in 1957 competing with an evil KGB agent, played by Cate Blanchett, to find a skull endowed with mystic powers.

"What galls is how together with America we defeated Hitler, and how we sympathized when Bin Laden hit them. But they go ahead and scare kids with Communists. These people have no shame," said Viktor Perov, a Communist Party member in Russia's second city of St. Petersburg.

The comments were made at a local Communist party meeting and posted on its Internet site www.kplo.ru.

The film, the fourth in the hugely successful Indiana Jones series, went on release in Russian cinemas on Thursday. Russian media said it was being shown on 808 screens, the widest ever release for a Hollywood movie.

In past episodes Indiana Jones has escaped from Nazi soldiers, an Egyptian snake pit, a Bedouin swordsman and a child-enslaving Indian demigod.

RUNNING DOGS

"Harrison Ford and Cate Blanchett (are) second-rate actors, serving as the running dogs of the CIA. We need to deprive these people of the right of entering the country," said another party member, Andrei Gindos.

Though the ranks of the once all-powerful Communist Party have dwindled since Soviet times, its members see themselves as the defenders of the achievements of the old Soviet Union.

Other communists said the generation born after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union were being fed revisionist, Hollywood history. They advocated banning the Indiana Jones outright to prevent "ideological sabotage."

"Our movie-goers are teenagers who are completely unaware of what happened in 1957," St Peterburg Communist Party chief Sergei Malinkovich told Reuters.

"They will go to the cinema and will be sure that in 1957 we made trouble for the United States and almost started a nuclear war."

"It's rubbish ... In 1957 the communists did not run with crystal skulls throughout the U.S. Why should we agree to that sort of lie and let the West trick our youth?"

Vladimir Mukhin, another member of the local Communist Party, said in comments posted on the Internet site that he would ask Russia's Culture Ministry to ban the film for its "anti-Soviet propaganda."

The "Indiana Jones" film is not the first Hollywood production to offend Russian sensibilities.

In 1998 the Russian parliament demanded the government explain why the Hollywood film "Armageddon" - which depicted a dilapidated Russian space station that blows apart because of a leaky pipe -- was allowed onto Russian cinema screens.

A government official at the time said the film, starring Bruce Willis as the leader of a team of astronauts sent to deflect an asteroid on a collision course with Earth, "mocked the achievements of Soviet and Russian technology."

Reuters/Nielsen

BUTLER REDSFAN
05-27-2008, 01:07 PM
More likely they want it banned for how bad it sucked. God, what a disappointment that movie was.

pahster
05-27-2008, 01:17 PM
More likely they want it banned for how bad it sucked. God, what a disappointment that movie was.

It was okay. It certainly wasn't as bad as somewhat recent highly anticipated movies like The Phantom Menace, X-Men 3, and Spiderman 3. I'd say it was about on par with Temple of Doom.

Roy Tucker
05-27-2008, 01:49 PM
"Harrison Ford and Cate Blanchett (are) second-rate actors, serving as the running dogs of the CIA. We need to deprive these people of the right of entering the country," said another party member, Andrei Gindos.



Jeez, it's been a long time since I've heard the "running capitalist lackey dogs of United States imperialism" accusation. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

If we get rid of anti-communist flicks, there goes half the movies from the 50's and 60's and most of the Sean Connery/James Bond movies.

durl
05-27-2008, 02:41 PM
But we want film-banning countries to "like" us.`

LoganBuck
05-27-2008, 02:55 PM
I'd say it was about on par with Temple of Doom.

Exactly what I said.

Yachtzee
05-27-2008, 02:59 PM
I suppose their next move is to call for the arrests of "Moose and Squirrel."

MrCinatit
05-27-2008, 03:02 PM
I have this weird idea: How about we treat movies as "entertainment" meant to be "viewed and enjoyed" rather than "historically accurate looks into the past".
I know it's kind of weird and out there - but I end up doing that and, as a result, end up enjoying the movie, rather than being concerned if Return of the King painted the elves in a wrong light.

redsfanmia
05-27-2008, 03:11 PM
More likely they want it banned for how bad it sucked. God, what a disappointment that movie was.

Really? I liked it a lot, but I check my brain at the door when I see movies anymore. I also temper my expectations so I am not disappointed.

RedsBaron
05-27-2008, 03:15 PM
If we get rid of anti-communist flicks, there goes half the movies from the 50's and 60's and most of the Sean Connery/James Bond movies.

Not really. John Wayne made a few anti-communist movies, but in most of the films that referenced the communists it was usually some "rogue" agent who was a "bad guy" rather than the Soviet Union itself. More often than not the bad guy had no affiliation with communism or the Soviet Union.
In his early novels, Ian Fleming did make the KGB the "bad guy," with James Bond berating himself for chasing "red Indians" rather than concentrating his efforts against Smersh, but this changed by the time of the films. In 1962's "Dr. No, " the title character was a member of SPECTRE and referred to "East" and "West" as merely being "points on the compass" rather than anything meaningful politically.
In 1963's "From Russia With Love" SPECTRE played off East vs. West, with Rosa Klebb not wanting her former superiors in the KGB to learn that she was now working for SPECTRE.
1964's "Goldfinger" was in no way an anti-communist film, with Auric Goldfinger being loosely allied with SPECTRE.
SPECTRE again was the "bad guy" in 1965's "Thunderball," attempting to blackmail the world through the threat to set off nuclear bombs stolen from a British bomber.
In 1967's "You Only Live Twice" the Soviet Union was wrongly accused by a rather hysterical U.S. representative of being behind the plot to capture American space capsules, with the USA threatening nuclear war over the incident (fortunately 007 was able to prove that SPECTRE had captured the capsule, and was further able to save the day).
Finally, Connery's last "official" Bond film, 1971's "Diamonds Are Forever," had Connery's 007 again battling SPECTRE and Blofeld, not the communists.
The communists didn't really become a significant part of 007 films until the Roger Moore era, but even then the films didn't have 007 battling directing against communists. In Moore's third outing as 007 in 1977's "The Spy Who Loved Me," he joins forces with Soviet agent "XXX", played by Barbara Bach, to stop a plot to have Soviet and American missile submarines each attack the other's country, therefore resulting in nuclear war each would think was started by the other, leaving bad guy Stormberg to build his new world under the sea.
In 1979's "Moonraker," 007 defeats Drax's plot to destroy mankind and then re-populate the earth with his master race; the Soviets offer their assistance to Bond, but it isn't needed.
In 1981's "For Your Eyes Only," the KGB does try to recover a lost British device which a third party has, but when Bond destroys the device and quips "that's detente comrade; you don't have it and I don't have it," the KGB head simply laughs and leaves Bond with a friendly wave.
In 1983's "Octo*****," one of the primary villians is a Soviet general, but it is made clear that he is acting on his own and that the Soviet leadership opposes his attempt to cause a nuclear bomb to go off on an American base in West Germany.
In 1985's "A View To A Kill," Christopher Walken's bad guy had prior KGB ties but clearly is acting on his own and is not part of any communistic plot to destroy Silicon Valley.
Timothy Dalton's 1987 outing as 007, "The Living Daylights," features bad guys who include a KGB officer, but again it is clear he is acting without Soviet approval, and a KGB head actually saves Bond at the film's conclusion.
In Pierce Brosnan's 1995's "Goldeneye," the bad guys include several Russians, but not as part of any action sanctioned by the Russian government.
In 1997's "Tomorrow Never Dies," Brosnan's 007 is assisted by a communist Chinese agent in stopping a plot by a Ted Turner/Rupert Murdoch style tycoon to start a nuclear war.
In 2001's "Die Another Day," Chinese communist agents help Bond early in the film in his quest to find the North Korean bad guys, who, as usual, are rogue agents acting without the approval of their government.
I cannot recall any significant mention at all of communists in the remaining 007 films.

Chip R
05-27-2008, 03:15 PM
Since the Russian commies aren't in power anymore, this reeks of a publicity stunt.

George Anderson
05-27-2008, 03:32 PM
I haven't seen the Indiana Jones flick yet but it can't make the Commies look any worse than "Red Dawn" did.

Roy Tucker
05-27-2008, 03:32 PM
Not really. John Wayne made a few anti-communist movies, but in most of the films that referenced the communists it was usually some "rogue" agent who was a "bad guy" rather than the Soviet Union itself. More often than not the bad guy had no affiliation with communism or the Soviet Union.
In his early novels, Ian Fleming did make the KGB the "bad guy," with James Bond berating himself for chasing "red Indians" rather than concentrating his efforts against Smersh, but this changed by the time of the films. In 1962's "Dr. No, " the title character was a member of SPECTRE and referred to "East" and "West" as merely being "points on the compass" rather than anything meaningful politically.
In 1963's "From Russia With Love" SPECTRE played off East vs. West, with Rosa Klebb not wanting her former superiors in the KGB to learn that she was now working for SPECTRE.
1964's "Goldfinger" was in no way an anti-communist film, with Auric Goldfinger being loosely allied with SPECTRE.
SPECTRE again was the "bad guy" in 1965's "Thunderball," attempting to blackmail the world through the threat to set off nuclear bombs stolen from a British bomber.
In 1967's "You Only Live Twice" the Soviet Union was wrongly accused by a rather hysterical U.S. representative of being behind the plot to capture American space capsules, with the USA threatening nuclear war over the incident (fortunately 007 was able to prove that SPECTRE had captured the capsule, and was further able to save the day).
Finally, Connery's last "official" Bond film, 1971's "Diamonds Are Forever," had Connery's 007 again battling SPECTRE and Blofeld, not the communists.
The communists didn't really become a significant part of 007 films until the Roger Moore era, but even then the films didn't have 007 battling directing against communists. In Moore's third outing as 007 in 1977's "The Spy Who Loved Me," he joins forces with Soviet agent "XXX", played by Barbara Bach, to stop a plot to have Soviet and American missile submarines each attack the other's country, therefore resulting in nuclear war each would think was started by the other, leaving bad guy Stormberg to build his new world under the sea.
In 1979's "Moonraker," 007 defeats Drax's plot to destroy mankind and then re-populate the earth with his master race; the Soviets offer their assistance to Bond, but it isn't needed.
In 1981's "For Your Eyes Only," the KGB does try to recover a lost British device which a third party has, but when Bond destroys the device and quips "that's detente comrade; you don't have it and I don't have it," the KGB head simply laughs and leaves Bond with a friendly wave.
In 1983's "Octo*****," one of the primary villians is a Soviet general, but it is made clear that he is acting on his own and that the Soviet leadership opposes his attempt to cause a nuclear bomb to go off on an American base in West Germany.
In 1985's "A View To A Kill," Christopher Walken's bad guy had prior KGB ties but clearly is acting on his own and is not part of any communistic plot to destroy Silicon Valley.
Timothy Dalton's 1987 outing as 007, "The Living Daylights," features bad guys who include a KGB officer, but again it is clear he is acting without Soviet approval, and a KGB head actually saves Bond at the film's conclusion.
In Pierce Brosnan's 1995's "Goldeneye," the bad guys include several Russians, but not as part of any action sanctioned by the Russian government.
In 1997's "Tomorrow Never Dies," Brosnan's 007 is assisted by a communist Chinese agent in stopping a plot by a Ted Turner/Rupert Murdoch style tycoon to start a nuclear war.
In 2001's "Die Another Day," Chinese communist agents help Bond early in the film in his quest to find the North Korean bad guys, who, as usual, are rogue agents acting without the approval of their government.
I cannot recall any significant mention at all of communists in the remaining 007 films.

Well then.... I stand corrected. :oops:

In the immortal words of Roseanne Rosannadanna, never mind.

RedsManRick
05-27-2008, 03:46 PM
It's funny how this reflects the mode of the thinking of the party. Movies = Propaganda. Private sector company = Government front. When you're wearing fascist glasses, it's hard to see other societies as anything but.

RedFanAlways1966
05-27-2008, 10:31 PM
Looks like a bunch of quotes from nobody important. Be like attending a local Republican, Democrat, Socialist or Green Party (etc, etc) meeting in El Paso, Texas and taking their comments as representitive of the feelings of the entire United States. Another case of bad journalism.

paintmered
05-27-2008, 11:11 PM
Since the Russian commies aren't in power anymore, this reeks of a publicity stunt.

Not in power, but the Russian Communist Party is anything but dead.

George Anderson
05-27-2008, 11:16 PM
Not in power, but the Russian Communist Party is anything but dead.

Correct, but having spent several weeks in Russia and had the pleasure of meeting several Russians, in general the younger generation of Russians embrace capitalism while the older generation still embraces communism.

paintmered
05-27-2008, 11:37 PM
Correct, but having spent several weeks in Russia and had the pleasure of meeting several Russians, in general the younger generation of Russians embrace capitalism while the older generation still embraces communism.

But of course. They have Starbucks now. :D

Rojo
05-28-2008, 04:45 PM
I have this weird idea: How about we treat movies as "entertainment" meant to be "viewed and enjoyed" rather than "historically accurate looks into the past".

Because they color how people look at the world.

redsrule2500
05-29-2008, 08:07 AM
Communism is ridiculous. With the amount of free information transfer these days it's amazing these ideas still exist in civilized nations such as Russia.

pahster
05-29-2008, 11:39 AM
Communism is ridiculous. With the amount of free information transfer these days it's amazing these ideas still exist in civilized nations such as Russia.

Maybe access to information is why the ideas still exist.