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corkedbat
05-28-2008, 08:30 AM
Johnny Bench just called in the Bob & Tom Show and they asked him about the new "Nutty Buddy" (the super cup).

He said he wished they'd had them when he played because he cracked seven during his carreer.

He said that one of the Reds pitchers saw Perry's spitball and decided he wanted to start throwing one too. He asked Johnny is they should set up some kind of signal for when h was going to throw it, but Johnny told him "no, you just throw it and I'll catch it."

He said it turned out to be a pretty good one - like it was falling off a table. He said one of them ended up in the dirt and cracked his cup.

He didn't talk like it was an isolated incident and din't say who the pitcher was.

WebScorpion
05-28-2008, 10:04 AM
I take it by the question mark, you're trying to figure out who it was. I've never heard of a Red in the 70's throwing a spitball, but I was just a kid then. My guesses would be Freddie Norman or Ross Grimsley. Of course it could have been almost anyone. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/nite.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

Chip R
05-28-2008, 10:06 AM
I take it by the question mark, you're trying to figure out who it was. I've never heard of a Red in the 70's throwing a spitball, but I was just a kid then. My guesses would be Freddie Norman or Ross Grimsley. Of course it could have been almost anyone. http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/ad/aussie.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)


I think I've heard that about Grimsley.

redsmetz
05-28-2008, 11:03 AM
I think I've heard that about Grimsley.

Tiny bit of sleuthing found this mention in SI in 1979:

A Spitter? 'Certainly Not!' Declares Expos' Grimsley. SI, March 17, 1979.

And this from a Tom Boswell chat on the Washington Post website, Washington Post 6/9/06.


And here I thought that Ross Grimsley, always suspected of keeping grease in his long hair to throw a spitball, was the Grimsleyt who would be known for (maybe) cheating. Oh, for the innocent days when Earl Weaver visited ROSS Grimsley on the mound with the bases loaded and said, "If you know how to cheat, this would be a good time to start."

westofyou
05-28-2008, 11:06 AM
I think I've heard that about Grimsley.

Me as well, big guys are usually the culprit, especially big guys with middling stuff.

SunDeck
05-28-2008, 12:43 PM
Norman didn't need to throw a spitter. He could pull a string and make the ball travel in loops.

Chip R
05-28-2008, 12:48 PM
Norman didn't need to throw a spitter. He could pull a string and make the ball travel in loops.


Yeah, that's what I was thinking too.

Spitball
05-28-2008, 07:05 PM
I suspect Jim Maloney. Late in his career, his was one of the names frequently associated with the pitch. There was at least one Astro who made the accusation after he no-hit Houston and struckout 13 in 1969.

This is from an article by Mark Armour from Bioproj.sabr.org, "Sure, there were many other accused practitioners of the spitter during the 1960s and 1970s-good pitchers like Phil Regan, Bill Singer, Jim Maloney-but no one threw it as well, and for as long, as Gaylord Perry."

Deepred05
05-29-2008, 01:01 AM
Tiny bit of sleuthing found this mention in SI in 1979:

A Spitter? 'Certainly Not!' Declares Expos' Grimsley. SI, March 17, 1979.

And this from a Tom Boswell chat on the Washington Post website, Washington Post 6/9/06.
And here I thought that Ross Grimsley, always suspected of keeping grease in his long hair to throw a spitball, was the Grimsleyt who would be known for (maybe) cheating. Oh, for the innocent days when Earl Weaver visited ROSS Grimsley on the mound with the bases loaded and said, "If you know how to cheat, this would be a good time to start."

That is some funny stuff from Weaver. I used to love his antics. (Except the 1970 world series.):)

redsmetz
05-29-2008, 05:59 AM
And here I thought that Ross Grimsley, always suspected of keeping grease in his long hair to throw a spitball, was the Grimsleyt who would be known for (maybe) cheating. Oh, for the innocent days when Earl Weaver visited ROSS Grimsley on the mound with the bases loaded and said, "If you know how to cheat, this would be a good time to start."

That is some funny stuff from Weaver. I used to love his antics. (Except the 1970 world series.):)

Interestingly, in another recounting of this event, they attributed the quote to George Bamberger, who I think was the O's pitching coach at the time. I think it sounds more like Weaver though myself.