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View Full Version : One of Last Remaining Uncontacted Tribes on Planet Photographed



Dom Heffner
05-30-2008, 09:13 AM
Wow.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080529/sc_nm/brazil_tribe_dc

Johnny Footstool
05-30-2008, 09:35 AM
Red pigment head to toe.

And they're quite angry at the large metal bird flying over their heads.

Tommyjohn25
05-30-2008, 09:57 AM
That is incredibly fascinating! Thanks for posting!

TeamSelig
05-30-2008, 12:14 PM
Just saw this on MSN. Very cool.

Caveat Emperor
05-30-2008, 01:14 PM
Its just amazing to think that, in this day and age, there are still people living in prehistoric conditions with no knowledge of the outside world and the advances that've been made.

To them, we'd look almost like beings from another planet.

westofyou
05-30-2008, 01:29 PM
To them, we'd look almost like beings from another planet.

Unfortunately they'll be the ones treated like as such as they are seen by most as just being in the way of a profit.

Falls City Beer
05-30-2008, 02:14 PM
Now the tricky part: how do we *kill* them?

Johnny Footstool
05-30-2008, 02:18 PM
Now the tricky part: how do we *kill* them?

With kindness.


And typhoid-infested blankets.

MrCinatit
05-30-2008, 02:22 PM
Its just amazing to think that, in this day and age, there are still people living in prehistoric conditions with no knowledge of the outside world and the advances that've been made.

To them, we'd look almost like beings from another planet.

I can about imagine that for several years, they have been some of the most content people on Earth as well. Unfortunately, with their discovery, that might come crashing back down to Earth.

I have heard there is another, even rarer tribe known as the Flamarlinfanatica, last seen 11 years ago, though some were to have been rumored to have surfaced 5 years ago. Some are thought to still be wandering the left field bleachers of dolphin stadium, but no one has been brave enough to venture in those parts for many years.

rotnoid
05-30-2008, 02:30 PM
I saw a site this morning asking for donations to help "protect" them. Not sure what good money will do them. Unless it's a bribe to those that would disrupt their peace. "here's fifty bucks, leave 'em alone."

SunDeck
05-30-2008, 03:21 PM
Reds fans, I see. Nice.

RedsManRick
05-30-2008, 03:44 PM
I wonder what they are thinking about the 'copter/plane that took those photographs. Must've been mindblowing and/or terrifying.

OldRightHander
05-30-2008, 04:06 PM
I wonder what they are thinking about the 'copter/plane that took those photographs. Must've been mindblowing and/or terrifying.

Reminds me in a way of The Gods Must be Crazy. That film was brilliant in its own quirky way with how it made us look at our modern world through someone else's eyes.

dougdirt
05-30-2008, 05:46 PM
Anyone else think this line was a bit strange?



One of the pictures, which can be seen on Survival International's Web site (http://www.survival-international.org), shows two Indian men covered in bright red pigment poised to fire arrows at the aircraft while another Indian looks on.

Indian men? I thought they were near the border of Brazil and Peru?

*BaseClogger*
05-30-2008, 05:56 PM
Reminds me in a way of The Gods Must be Crazy. That film was brilliant in its own quirky way with how it made us look at our modern world through someone else's eyes.

Weirdest. Movie. Ever.

Reds Fanatic
05-30-2008, 06:06 PM
Here is a longer article about the tribe.


Brazil reveals 'uncontacted' Amazon tribe
Government decides to release photos to alert world to threats on Indians

updated 1 hour, 35 minutes ago
RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil - Brazil's government agreed to release stunning photos of Amazon Indians firing arrows at an airplane so that the world can better understand the threats facing one of the few tribes still living in near-total isolation from civilization, officials said Friday.

Anthropologists have known about the group for some 20 years but released the images now to call attention to fast-encroaching development near the Indians' home in the dense jungles near Peru.

"We put the photos out because if things continue the way they are going, these people are going to disappear," said Jose Carlos Meirelles, who coordinates government efforts to protect four "uncontacted" tribes for Brazil's National Indian Foundation.

Shot in late April and early May, the foundation's photos show about a dozen Indians, mostly naked and painted red, wielding bows and arrows outside six grass-thatched huts.

Meirelles told The Associated Press in a phone interview that anthropologists know next to nothing about the group, but suspect it is related to the Tano and Aruak tribes.

Brazil's National Indian Foundation believes there may be as many as 68 "uncontacted" groups around Brazil, although only 24 have been officially confirmed.

Anthropologists say almost all of these tribes know about western civilization and have sporadic contact with prospectors, rubber tappers and loggers, but choose to turn their backs on civilization, usually because they have been attacked.

"It's a choice they made to remain isolated or maintain only occasional contacts, but these tribes usually obtain some modern goods through trading with other Indians," said Bernardo Beronde, an anthropologist who works in the region.

Brazilian officials once tried to contact such groups. Now they try to protectively isolate them.

The four tribes monitored by Meirelles include perhaps 500 people who roam over an area of about 1.6 million acres.

He said that over the 20 years he has been working in the area, the number of "malocas," or grass-roofed huts, has doubled, suggesting that the policy of isolation is working and that populations are growing.

Remaining isolated, however, gets more complicated by the day.

Loggers are closing in on the Indians' homeland — Brazil's environmental protection agency said Friday it had shut down 28 illegal sawmills in Acre state, where these tribes are located. And logging on the Peruvian border has sent many Indians fleeing into Brazil, Meirelles said.

"On the Brazilian side we don't have logging yet, but I'd like to emphasize the 'yet,'" he said.

A new road being paved from Peru into Acre will likely bring in hordes of poor settlers. Other Amazon roads have led to 30 miles of rain forest being cut down on each side, scientists say.

While "uncontacted" Indians often respond violently to contact — Meirelles caught an arrow in the face from some of the same Indians in 2004 — the greater threat is to the Indians.

"First contact is often completely catastrophic for "uncontacted" tribes. It's not unusual for 50 percent of the tribe to die in months after first contact," said Miriam Ross, a campaigner with the Indian rights group Survival International. "They don't generally have immunity to diseases common to outside society. Colds and flu that aren't usually fatal to us can completely wipe them out."

Survival International estimates about 100 tribes worldwide have chosen to avoid contact, but said the only truly uncontacted tribe is the Sentinelese, who live on North Sentinel island off the coast of India and shoot arrows at anyone who comes near.

Last year, the Metyktire tribe, with about 87 members, was discovered in a densely jungled portion of the 12.1-million-acre Menkregnoti Indian reservation in the Brazilian Amazon, when two of its members showed up at another tribe's village.

Dom Heffner
05-31-2008, 01:43 AM
Indian men? I thought they were near the border of Brazil and Peru?

Perhaps this is an explanation? From Wikipedia:

The Indigenous peoples in Brazil (Portuguese: povos indígenas) comprise a large number of distinct ethnic groups who inhabited the country's present territory prior to its discovery by Europeans around 1500. Unlike Christopher Columbus, who thought he had reached the East Indies, the Portuguese, most notably by Vasco da Gama, had already reached India via the Indian Ocean route when they reached Brazil. Nevertheless the word índios ("Indians"), was by then established to designate the peoples of the New World and stuck being used today in the Portuguese language to designate these peoples, while the people of India, Asia are called indianos in order to distinguish the two peoples.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_peoples_in_Brazil

redsmetz
05-31-2008, 11:14 AM
I've forwarded this to my daughter who just completed her senior project in college on protection of native workers in Brazil, with some of the project focusing on Sr. Dorothy Stang, the Dayton native murdered in the Amazon for her work with the people there.

When I was a kid in Jr. High, I read a book about the last member of a primitive California tribe who stepped in to the modern world in 1911. His name was Ishi and he was a member of the Yahi tribe - lived at a university until he died of TB in 1916.

http://www.library.ucsf.edu/collres/archives/hist/ishi/

westofyou
05-31-2008, 11:33 AM
When I was a kid in Jr. High, I read a book about the last member of a primitive California tribe who stepped in to the modern world in 1911. His name was Ishi and he was a member of the Yahi tribe - lived at a university until he died of TB in 1916.

http://www.library.ucsf.edu/collres/archives/hist/ishi/

Ishi... only the last because he hid from the Padres that chased all the Indians into the mountains... all that didn't want to convert that is.

Ishi is an institution in California, California Indians were pretty much wiped out by the time the Gold Rush started, mostly because of Spanish expansion a couple of hundred of years prior... those tribes are never mentioned like the the upper midwest tribes, most of because they were few and peaceful.

But they still fell to the hordes of newcomers

cincinnati chili
05-31-2008, 12:24 PM
Perhaps we should dispatch the "getting gay with kids choir."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0n9VLsDVK0

BCubb2003
05-31-2008, 12:42 PM
Reds fans, I see. Nice.

Old-school Reds fans. Probably haven't heard of SABR yet.

Could be Shelmikedmu, I suppose.

919191
06-24-2008, 07:43 AM
It is a hoax.


http://buzz.yahoo.com/buzzlog/91536

Danny Serafini
06-24-2008, 08:52 AM
Not quite a hoax, it really is an uncontacted tribe, just not a new one. They've known about them since 1910.

OldRightHander
06-24-2008, 09:05 AM
Ishi... only the last because he hid from the Padres that chased all the Indians into the mountains... all that didn't want to convert that is.


Didn't he used to pitch for the Dodgers a few years back?

Oxilon
06-24-2008, 03:03 PM
Weirdest. Movie. Ever.

You must have never seen Cannibal Holocaust than. The film is banned in 19 countries across the world.

Chip R
06-24-2008, 03:26 PM
http://d.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/nm/20080531/2008_05_30t092104_450x306_us_brazil_tribe.jpg?

I understand back in the day they painted themselves red because they saw this picture:

http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x176/skullcrshr/Zoners/9a01.jpg

ochre
06-25-2008, 12:37 PM
Hey. That's BPS62!

MaineRed
06-25-2008, 11:24 PM
http://www.imonthe.net/66wnbc/images/charles-mccord-late80s.gif

NoCalRed
08-09-2011, 07:23 PM
Update.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/aug/09/brazil-amazon-tribe-drug-traffickers

Ravenlord
08-15-2011, 05:58 PM
Now the tricky part: how do we *kill* them?

cameras.