PDA

View Full Version : Can playing a lot of golf mess up a baseball player's swing?



Blitz Dorsey
06-09-2008, 10:54 PM
A lot of baseball players enjoy hitting the links. However, using common sense, I would have to think playing a lot of golf can mess up a baseball hitter's swing. Maybe not to an extreme level, but baseball is a game of milimeters as we all know.

I could be way off here, but wanted to get some thoughts from the board. Do you think playing a lot of golf (I'm talking almost every day) can mess up a hitter's swing? I know it took me a long time to correct my slice in golf from years of playing baseball and softball. I can't imagine trying to play golf and baseball a lot around the same time. No, it's not the same sport and I'm sure people will argue there is no connection, but I think there has to be some sort of an affect.

Just like in tennis, you can't play racquetball a lot or you will mess up your tennis swing. I love racquetball but never play anymore because I also play tennis and every time I play racquetball a lot my tennis swing goes to hell.

Redhook
06-09-2008, 11:01 PM
In high school, I struggled playing baseball after golfing a lot. I added too much upper-cut to my baseball swing.

Now, I'm a firm believer that each sport can help the other sport if done properly. In both sports you want a level swing through impact. A good golf swing can help a baseball swing, and vice versa. However, I emphasize the word 'good'. I'm guessing most baseball players try to hit up on the golf ball which could/would lead to a poor baseball swing.

Blitz Dorsey
06-09-2008, 11:04 PM
In high school, I struggled playing baseball after golfing a lot. I added too much upper-cut to my baseball swing.

Now, I'm a firm believer that each sport can help the other sport if done properly. In both sports you want a level swing through impact. A good golf swing can help a baseball swing, and vice versa. However, I emphasize the word 'good'. I'm guessing most baseball players try to hit up on the golf ball which could/would lead to a poor baseball swing.

That is exactly what I was thinking... good to see I'm not alone here.

bucksfan2
06-10-2008, 08:21 AM
A lot of baseball players enjoy hitting the links. However, using common sense, I would have to think playing a lot of golf can mess up a baseball hitter's swing. Maybe not to an extreme level, but baseball is a game of milimeters as we all know.

I could be way off here, but wanted to get some thoughts from the board. Do you think playing a lot of golf (I'm talking almost every day) can mess up a hitter's swing? I know it took me a long time to correct my slice in golf from years of playing baseball and softball. I can't imagine trying to play golf and baseball a lot around the same time. No, it's not the same sport and I'm sure people will argue there is no connection, but I think there has to be some sort of an affect.

Just like in tennis, you can't play racquetball a lot or you will mess up your tennis swing. I love racquetball but never play anymore because I also play tennis and every time I play racquetball a lot my tennis swing goes to hell.

I don't know how much golf (every day) a baseball player could play during the season. I would assume that MLB golfers would only be able to play on off days. I would assume that they would only play on the day of a game if they got to play a great golf course. For example I can see a player play Torrey Pines the day of a game if they were in San Diego.

As for the swing I don't think it is that much of a deal. The swing is pretty much different but at the same time the principles are similar. The one problem I can forsee is golf may lead to a baseball swing in which you drop your hands and have more of an uppercut. I think all is solved with a BP session. I am sure if MLB players golf the day before a game they have a set routine that they go through during a BP session.

15fan
06-10-2008, 08:29 AM
John Smoltz is an avid golfer. Maddux and Glavine play(ed) a whole lot, too.

Maddux: 350 W, 4892.0 IP, and 3,315 Ks.

Glavine: 305 W, 4406.1 IP, and 2,604 Ks.

Smoltz: 210 W, 154 Sv, 3395.0 IP and 3,011 Ks.

Maybe Reds pitchers aren't playing enough golf on their off days.