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Chip R
08-04-2008, 01:59 PM
A few observations: I didn't realize the Colliseum held that many people now. They must have done some remodeling lately. I didn't realize Bama and Georgia's stadiums were that big. Georgia and tOSU fans sure do a good job of wearing red. Playing at LSU at night looks intimidating. And that's without the noise. Interesting they picked a non game day picture for Michigan. I thought there'd be more orange at Tennessee. PSU's stadium is just huge.

http://collegefootball.rivals.com/photofeature.asp?SID=1144&fid=23711

RedsManRick
08-04-2008, 02:52 PM
What I find most entertaining about Beaver Stadium is that it sits in a town of 40,000 people and yet it always sells out. I grew up in State College and can attest that there's not much else to do a Saturday afternoon in Happy Valley.

As it expanded, the stadium has taken on a Frankenstein quality. Aesthetically, it can't hold a candle to the Horseshoe or Bryant-Denny.

Chip R
08-04-2008, 03:13 PM
As it expanded, the stadium has taken on a Frankenstein quality. Aesthetically, it can't hold a candle to the Horseshoe or Bryant-Denny.


Good comparison. A lot of the other ones - especially the Big House - don't look really big.

KronoRed
08-04-2008, 03:19 PM
Ahh those upper decks so far from the action, gotta love those things.

improbus
08-04-2008, 03:28 PM
What is funny is that football is probably the worst spectator sport in person. A five yard run on TV looks huge, but in person it looks like nothing. Football games get by almost solely on atmosphere.

Roy Tucker
08-04-2008, 03:29 PM
Ahhh, I'm an old guy.

I remember Ohio Stadium without the south stands (where that shot in the link was taken from), with the track around the football field, and without the new upper seats (the rows above the far end notch). When I'd put a 12 pack of Stroh's in my backpack and just walk into a game. And the upper deck would have a definite counter-culture haze hanging above it.

With the escalating sizes of their stadia, it seems that tOSU and UM suffer from a case of stadium envy.

gonelong
08-04-2008, 03:36 PM
Ahhh, I'm an old guy.

I remember Ohio Stadium without the south stands (where that shot in the link was taken from), with the track around the football field, and without the new upper seats (the rows above the far end notch). When I'd put a 12 pack of Stroh's in my backpack and just walk into a game. And the upper deck would have a definite counter-culture haze hanging above it.

I am glad I got to experience the stadium before the renovation, not that I mind it after-the-fact.


With the escalating sizes of their stadia, it seems that tOSU and UM suffer from a case of stadium envy.

They could each add 10,000 seats today and still sell out. I fear that over the next decade access to tOSU football tickets is going to just get leaner and leaner. The Mrs. and I have already talked about trying to set up a yearly road-trip so we can at least get to one game a year.

GL

15fan
08-04-2008, 05:32 PM
Georgia fans sure do a good job of wearing red.

That's just the backs of their necks. ;)

MasonBuzz3
08-04-2008, 05:44 PM
Interesting they picked a non game day picture for Michigan.

I'm thinking that has to do with the renovations going on at the Big House, probably wanted a current picture.

crazy to think of the size of some of these stadiums and the still high demand of tickets. OSU or UM could probably get up to around 115,00 - 125,000 seats and still sell out.

*BaseClogger*
08-04-2008, 07:02 PM
crazy to think of the size of some of these stadiums and the still high demand of tickets. OSU or UM could probably get up to around 115,00 - 125,000 seats and still sell out.

I agree they would sellout on Big Ten games, but I have a hard time seeing tOSU selling 125,000 tickets for the Youngstown State Game. The scalpars will practically be giving away tickets by game time...

SunDeck
08-04-2008, 07:04 PM
IU is expanding the stadium in Bloomington...and they can't draw 40,000 a game except when a Big Ten team's fans come to visit.

MaineRed
08-04-2008, 08:38 PM
At least the Big Ten is first in something.

Blimpie
08-04-2008, 10:21 PM
At least the Big Ten is first in something.We have our winner :beerme:

Caveat Emperor
08-04-2008, 11:48 PM
At least the Big Ten is first in something.

You mean besides getting run out of the stadium in national title games? ;)

paintmered
08-04-2008, 11:56 PM
You mean besides getting run out of the stadium in national title games? ;)

Yep, that's still not old...

MaineRed
08-05-2008, 12:58 PM
A few observations: I didn't realize the Colliseum held that many people now. I thought there'd be more orange at Tennessee.


I'm not a fan of the Colliseum. What is the deal with those areas behind the end zone and in the corner where there are no seats? It looks so dumb IMO. They have those temporary bleachers and then nothing else on that end. I've never liked the atmosphere there. At least not the one captured on TV.

If you look close at the picture of Tennessee there are a lot of folks who aren't in their seats. Must have been taken at the end of a blowout or something as you can see a lot of gray bleachers.

Chip R
08-05-2008, 01:28 PM
I'm not a fan of the Colliseum. What is the deal with those areas behind the end zone and in the corner where there are no seats? It looks so dumb IMO. They have those temporary bleachers and then nothing else on that end. I've never liked the atmosphere there. At least not the one captured on TV.

They must have done some renovations on it cause a few years ago, IIRC, they onlyseated about 80K or so for a game. I wonder if they have done some renovations on it cause I heard it was in bad shape a few years ago.



If you look close at the picture of Tennessee there are a lot of folks who aren't in their seats. Must have been taken at the end of a blowout or something as you can see a lot of gray bleachers.


Yeah, you may be right cause all I've heard about UT games was that Neyland Stadium is a sea of orange.

BuckeyeRed27
08-05-2008, 01:47 PM
I'm not a fan of the Colliseum. What is the deal with those areas behind the end zone and in the corner where there are no seats? It looks so dumb IMO. They have those temporary bleachers and then nothing else on that end. I've never liked the atmosphere there. At least not the one captured on TV.

If you look close at the picture of Tennessee there are a lot of folks who aren't in their seats. Must have been taken at the end of a blowout or something as you can see a lot of gray bleachers.

The field of at the Colliseum is pushed towards one end of the stadium. So that area where there are no seats is a lot further away from the actual field than you would think. You could still probably have people sit there but it would be some awful seating. The visitors section is a joke there too. It is in the upper decks behind the temp bleachers. So to see the field you are looking through those bleachers to the field.

Chip R
08-05-2008, 01:58 PM
The field of at the Colliseum is pushed towards one end of the stadium. So that area where there are no seats is a lot further away from the actual field than you would think. You could still probably have people sit there but it would be some awful seating. The visitors section is a joke there too. It is in the upper decks behind the temp bleachers. So to see the field you are looking through those bleachers to the field.


I wonder if the same people who built Soldier Field in Chicago built the Colliseum because both were huge - Soldier Field used to hold around 120K - and were one end of the stadium.

IslandRed
08-05-2008, 02:28 PM
For what it's worth, the Coliseum was not purpose-built for football, although it's been played there all along. It originally had a track around the field and was built with the idea of hosting an Olympics (which it did, twice). So that's why the seating configuration looks funky in places. It's actually better than it used to be, I understand they removed the track and added closer sideline seats back in the '90s.

Blimpie
08-06-2008, 11:07 AM
I thought there'd be more orange at Tennessee.I agree. That photo must have been taken when they were all out on the highway paving crews...or sleeping in their deer stands, perhaps.

MartyFan
08-10-2008, 06:57 PM
IU is expanding the stadium in Bloomington...and they can't draw 40,000 a game except when a Big Ten team's fans come to visit.

Don't look now but IU is poised to explode as a real force in BigTen Football...when they win the fans will come.

Maybe someone should get that plan to Mr.C?

improbus
08-10-2008, 10:45 PM
Don't look now but IU is poised to explode as a real force in BigTen Football...when they win the fans will come.

Maybe someone should get that plan to Mr.C?

As soon as they improve, their coach will leave.

As a side note, I know the "SEC is better than the Big Ten" has been beaten to death, but here is what sealed it for me. I lived in Lexington for three years. Lexington is obviously a basketball town and yet they still filled 65,000 seats for every game, even during the lean years. The same goes for Starkeville, Oxford, and Columbia. South Carolina is a historically abysmal football program, and yet they always sold out or close to it. There are no road/home games. In the Big Ten, OSU plays home games in Columbus, Evanston, Bloomington, Champaign, Minneapolis, and during some season, West Lafayette.

guttle11
08-11-2008, 12:06 AM
As soon as they improve, their coach will leave.

As a side note, I know the "SEC is better than the Big Ten" has been beaten to death, but here is what sealed it for me. I lived in Lexington for three years. Lexington is obviously a basketball town and yet they still filled 65,000 seats for every game, even during the lean years. The same goes for Starkeville, Oxford, and Columbia. South Carolina is a historically abysmal football program, and yet they always sold out or close to it. There are no road/home games. In the Big Ten, OSU plays home games in Columbus, Evanston, Bloomington, Champaign, Minneapolis, and during some season, West Lafayette.


That doesn't make the SEC better at anything. It means their fans value college football more than others. That's their thing. The NFL struggles to compete in Georgia and especially Jacksonville.

The Midwest (outside of OSU/Michigan) is much more of a college hoops area than college football. How many SEC schools can't fill up a basketball arena without UK fans' help? And then you have the NFL and baseball. Sports interests in Big Ten country are very diverse. Much less so in the SEC.

improbus
08-11-2008, 10:19 AM
That doesn't make the SEC better at anything. It means their fans value college football more than others. That's their thing. The NFL struggles to compete in Georgia and especially Jacksonville.

The Midwest (outside of OSU/Michigan) is much more of a college hoops area than college football. How many SEC schools can't fill up a basketball arena without UK fans' help? And then you have the NFL and baseball. Sports interests in Big Ten country are very diverse. Much less so in the SEC.

I was talking about college football. The expectations for SEC football are astronomical. Urban Meyer was at the SEC Media Day and looked around the room and said that 10 coaches think that their team is going to be playing in the SEC title game in Atlanta. In the Big Ten, there are maybe 3-4 teams each year that even think they have a chance.

I do agree about basketball, but the talk here is about football. Also historically, the SEC schools don't have pro teams to compete with. Wisconsin would keep the Pack over the Badgers, Minneapolis would keep the Vikings over the Gophers, etc... What else is there to watch in Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, etc...

gonelong
08-11-2008, 11:07 AM
I was talking about college football. The expectations for SEC football are astronomical. Urban Meyer was at the SEC Media Day and looked around the room and said that 10 coaches think that their team is going to be playing in the SEC title game in Atlanta. In the Big Ten, there are maybe 3-4 teams each year that even think they have a chance. .

Some of that has to do with having two divisions, I'd think. The SEC is rolling right now, should make for some interesting in season match-ups this year. Fall Saturday's are my favorite time of year.

GL

improbus
08-11-2008, 11:13 AM
Some of that has to do with having two divisions, I'd think. The SEC is rolling right now, should make for some interesting in season match-ups this year. Fall Saturday's are my favorite time of year.

GL
Yeah, but I don't think divisions would help IU, Purdue, NU, Minnesota, Iowa, or Michigan State win the Big Ten.

IslandRed
08-11-2008, 02:01 PM
There are expectations and then there's reality. There might be ten SEC schools that THINK they're going to Atlanta, but realistically only 6-7 have any justification for it. Furthermore, gonelong's right -- the bar of contending is lower in a conference with divisions. It's easier to win a six-team division, or hope you can win a six-team division, than an 11-team division. Doesn't mean the league itself is any easier, it's just the math. It's no different than in baseball. When they went to division play, more teams became contenders.

gonelong
08-11-2008, 02:06 PM
Yeah, but I don't think divisions would help IU, Purdue, NU, Minnesota, Iowa, or Michigan State win the Big Ten.

Probably not, but it'd let them think they could.

GL

*BaseClogger*
08-11-2008, 02:35 PM
Yeah, but I don't think divisions would help IU, Purdue, NU, Minnesota, Iowa, or Michigan State win the Big Ten.

I think most of those teams could compete in a division that doesn't include Ohio State...

improbus
08-11-2008, 02:52 PM
I think most of those teams could compete in a division that doesn't include Ohio State...

Or Penn State or Wisconsin or Michigan...

*BaseClogger*
08-11-2008, 04:55 PM
Or Penn State or Wisconsin or Michigan...

I can easily see Michigan State winning more games than Penn State or Michigan...