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View Full Version : Chad Johnson changing his name?



Yachtzee
08-13-2008, 11:45 PM
http://www.profootballtalk.com/2008/08/12/johnson-wants-to-be-ocho-cinco-legally/

Looks like CJ is getting silly again. I heard that if "Ocho Cinco" is already taken, Rod Smart is willing to sell CJ his "He Hate Me" persona.

macro
08-14-2008, 12:24 PM
As if that's not bizarre enough, he's also claiming that he and others he knows are better swimmers than Michael Phelps...

http://www.postchronicle.com/news/original/article_212164904.shtml

RFS62
08-16-2008, 03:20 PM
I think Bozo is already taken

TeamSelig
08-17-2008, 03:06 AM
As if that's not bizarre enough, he's also claiming that he and others he knows are better swimmers than Michael Phelps...

http://www.postchronicle.com/news/original/article_212164904.shtml

C'mon, you can't take Chad serious. He is just joking around.

BuckU
08-29-2008, 02:22 PM
According to CTR, Chad officially changed his name

http://www.thelotd.com/ctrent/blog/2008/08/29/new_name_same_game


New name, same game?
Friday, August 29, 2008, 01:42 PM EST [Bengals]

I just called the Broward County (Fla.) Court Clerk and Chad Johnson is no longer.

Officially, legally, yesterday, his name was changed to Chad Ocho Cinco.

Bengals spokesman Jack Brennan said the team has no announcement or response to the reports that the receiver has legally changed his name.

In 2006 Johnson was fined for wearing an "Ocho Cinco" nameplate on the back of his jersey for pregame warm-ups. He wore "Johnson" on the back of his jersey for the game.

Now, presumably, he would be able to wear Ocho Cinco on the back of his jersey and the Bengals could sell them.

Oh, the fun never ends.

camisadelgolf
08-30-2008, 02:24 AM
His middle name is 'Javon', which I believe is Spanish for 'soap'. Chad Soap Eight Five. I don't get it. Maybe it's so he can still be called 'CJ'.

Degenerate39
08-30-2008, 11:19 AM
I'm not surprised. That's all I have to say about CJ right now.

Highlifeman21
08-30-2008, 09:02 PM
Is his last name Ocho Cinco, or just Cinco?

I would think for a last name, it would have to be Ocho-Cinco, since Ocho and Cinco are 2 separate words..

Should prove interesting.

nate
08-30-2008, 09:03 PM
Is his last name Ocho Cinco, or just Cinco?

I would think for a last name, it would have to be Ocho-Cinco, since Ocho and Cinco are 2 separate words..

Should prove interesting.

It's "Ocho Cinco"...making for some interesting initials.

BoydsOfSummer
08-31-2008, 02:28 PM
Maybe 'Ass-man', if Kosmo Kramer isn't using it anymore.

Hap
09-01-2008, 10:59 AM
Shouldn't it be [ochenta y cinco]?

camisadelgolf
09-02-2008, 05:02 AM
Shouldn't it be [ochenta y cinco]?

Yeah, but I think that's supposed to add to the 'charm'.

RichRed
09-03-2008, 03:45 PM
The Bengals could really make "Ocho Cinco" mad and tell him they're retiring #85 in honor of Isaac Curtis. Here, try this 00 jersey instead; it seems to suit you.

guttle11
09-03-2008, 09:29 PM
He can call himself Fred Astaire, as long as he catches the ball and crosses the goal line up to his standards.

RFS62
09-07-2008, 04:44 PM
Ocho Stinko

remdog
09-07-2008, 05:03 PM
Ocho Cinco may want to change his name to Chad Johnson. That guy could play.

Rem

Roy Tucker
09-10-2008, 08:51 AM
Oops. Looks like it might be a while till we see the Ocho Cinco jerseys. Don't mess with NFL merchandising. Somebody didn't do their homework...

http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080910/SPT02/809100365/1066




Name tag has high price tag
NFL: Bengal first must buy 'C. Johnson' gear to wear 'Ocho Cinco'

By Dustin Dow ddow@enquirer.com September 10, 2008

Bengals wide receiver Chad Ocho Cinco is learning first-hand how seriously the NFL takes its ability to license players and their names.

Before he can wear a jersey with his new surname emblazoned on the back, he first must buy every "C. Johnson" jersey for sale nationwide. And there are thousands of "C. Johnson" replica jerseys available, with a production cost of about $48 apiece.

"When a player requests a name change or a number change, the player is responsible for that unsold inventory," NFL spokesperson Brian McCarthy said.

Ochocinco (one word) became the receiver's legal surname Aug. 28. But he is called Chad Ocho Cinco (two words) on the team's official roster.

Replica jerseys are made by Reebok, the official licensee of NFL apparel. Reebok declined to say how much "C. Johnson" inventory is sitting unsold in stores.

A CNBC report on Monday said the jerseys, which retail for about $75 each, could cost Ocho Cinco $48 per jersey, the cost of production.

At Koch Sporting Goods in downtown Cincinnati, the number of "C. Johnson" jerseys in stock is "in the hundreds," owner Chris Koch said.

He said that the expected sales increases for "Ocho Cinco" jerseys would probably offset any profits lost from a decline in value of the "C. Johnson" jerseys.

By making Ocho Cinco wear "C. Johnson," the NFL says it is protecting its contractual obligation to Reebok, which has been the league's outfitter since 2001.

While McCarthy could not recall any player in recent history wanting to change his name, most players who want to change numbers rethink their decision after they find out how expensive it could be to purchase the unsold jerseys.

One exception is Bengals rookie linebacker Keith Rivers, who reportedly paid about $11,000 to change his number from 58 to 55.

What makes Ocho Cinco's situation unusual is the publicity surrounding the name change. Reebok now has an interest in selling "Ocho Cinco" jerseys - spokesperson Mandy Murphy said the company simply is following the league's leadership on the current "Ocho Cinco" ban.

Both Reebok and the NFL said a resolution hopefully will be reached soon, though neither said whether it would happen before the Bengals play at home against the Tennessee Titans on Sunday.

"Reebok certainly has an economic incentive to let him change the name," said Matt Mitten, the director of Marquette University's National Sports Law Institute. "But what's happening here is that the league is strictly relying upon its licensing agreement. It's worried that if players could change their names or numbers on a whim, then that's going to hurt the NFL's licensing agreement in the long term."

Reebok is in the midst of a 10-year, $250 million licensing agreement with the NFL, and those kinds of sponsorship dollars are invaluable, sports legal analyst Keith Dobkowski said. He pointed out that the Bengals made $194 million in revenue in 2007, but only $44 million of it came from gate receipts and $11.7 from operating revenue, figures that were reported by Forbes.com.

"In order for Reebok to get their return on investment, they must create certain exclusivities in their contract with the NFL," he said. "In this case, I would suspect that the NFL will allow Johnson to update his uniform once Reebok has the time to create 'Ocho Cinco' uniforms to place in stores across the country."

For now, Koch said stores such as his can't order "Ocho Cinco" jerseys from Reebok. He said his store has been replacing the "C. Johnson" nameplate with a customized "Ocho Cinco" one when fans place special orders or bring Ocho Cinco's No. 85 jersey into the store.

If the "Ocho Cinco" jersey is approved for on-field use and sale by the NFL, it could be lucrative not only for retailers, Reebok and the NFL, but also for Ocho Cinco. Players receive a portion of the revenue from their jersey sales. The "C. Johnson" jersey finished last season as the 14th-most popular, according to NFLShop.com, and an "Ocho Cinco" change could drive popularity back into the top 10.

Local sports investment analyst Adam Wolter expects "Ocho Cinco" merchandise and signatures to be substantially more valuable than "C. Johnson" in the short term. He figured a replica jersey signed "Chad Johnson" might be worth $200, but a jersey signed "Chad Ocho Cinco" with the name "Ocho Cinco" on the back could be worth $400.

"No doubt there's going to be more demand right now for Ocho Cinco," Wolter said.

westofyou
09-10-2008, 11:17 AM
"When a player requests a name change or a number change, the player is responsible for that unsold inventory," NFL spokesperson Brian McCarthy said.

No Fun League, corporate ball at its worst. A mirror of America's pimples and other faults.