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OldRightHander
10-15-2008, 04:20 PM
I don't like change. I never really have. I like to figure out how things are and get comfortable and I resist vehemently when people want to go and change things. That doesn't apply to every area in my life, but that is true of me for the most part.

It all started here. I was very comfortable viewing baseball through Marty colored glasses and I didn't need to be confused by any dissenting opinions. Then I start hanging around here and learning new things and what do you know, I don't know where I've left my Marty colored glasses. No great loss there. The frames were bent and things looked kind of blurry through them anyway.

Over the years I've always prided myself on my ability to find my way around the country with nothing more than an atlas and a local map for the city I was heading into, and I did pretty well doing that. But I started hanging around a web site for expedited truckers and more and more people kept talking about GPS units. I don't need something to tell me how to get around. I know how to read a map. People who can't read maps are idiots who shouldn't be behind the wheel of a vehicle.

Well, they wore me down. I now own a GPS unit. I haven't given up on the maps as well, because I think it's important to be able to find your way with them, but I've become hooked on the other features like finding local restaurants, grocery stores, and historical landmarks. I still use my atlas to route myself from city to city and then I just enter the route into the GPS, and I still think people who can't get around without one are idiots, but at least now I'm not so dead set against them. It will probably pay for itself pretty soon with the money I've saved not dialing 411.

And then there's music. I'm now in that "what are those young people listening to?" stage and that attitude had carried over not only to what they're listening to, but how they're listening to it. The whole mp3 thing just scares the daylights out of me. It's not that I don't like different formats for storing music, but I fear the end of the album. It seems to me that people are just grabbing individual songs all the time and that eventually artists are going to stop producing albums. I like albums. It's all I've known. I listen to them beginning to end, because that's what the artist created and that's how it was meant to be heard. Then recently I was at a friend's house and he showed me his ipod. I was expecting to see all these individual songs on there, maybe sorted by artist, but he showed me that he had actual albums stored on there and he could pull up an album and play it straight through, then select another one. That was a revelation to me. I guess I had never really thought it through, or even bothered to research it, but I now own an ipod.

But don't go thinking I've given up all of my curmudgeonly ways. My ipod only has complete albums stored on it. I just can't bring myself to download separate songs. Heck, I can't even bring myself to just download things. I found myself buying a CD the other day and then loading it onto the ipod. The CDs now stay with the stereo at home, which still has a turntable by the way, while the ipod goes on the road with me. I have my entire CD collection on there and I think I might work on converting some of my LPs, but only in their entirety.

Now texting...nah. I can't bring myself that far, but at least I'm for the most part living in the current century. That's a start, isn't it?

Degenerate39
10-15-2008, 04:23 PM
Welcome to the darkside

Highlifeman21
10-15-2008, 04:37 PM
I hear ya about GPS units.

I bought my fiancee one last year for her birthday (essentially to shut her up about wanting one), and I've found that while I feel that I know my way around very well, sometimes I don't always know the suggested fastest route.

So, that's why I like them. They know the fastest/quickest way from point A to point B.

Aside from that, they are useless, and people become dependent on them. My fiancee is a prime example. Her GPS is such a crutch for her it's amusing. I'm convinced she couldn't get from Unionville to Farmington without it.

Ok, I'm kidding about using it to get from Unionville to Farmington for her, but it's not far from the truth!

BRM
10-15-2008, 04:48 PM
I really like GPS units but I honestly don't have a need for one. I very rarely go anywhere that I'm not already familiar with.

Red Heeler
10-15-2008, 10:33 PM
I hear ya about GPS units.

I bought my fiancee one last year for her birthday (essentially to shut her up about wanting one), and I've found that while I feel that I know my way around very well, sometimes I don't always know the suggested fastest route.

So, that's why I like them. They know the fastest/quickest way from point A to point B.


Around here, a GPS will occasionally take you down a goat path unfit for any vehicle that cannot compete in the Baja 1000.

OldRightHander
10-15-2008, 11:07 PM
So, that's why I like them. They know the fastest/quickest way from point A to point B.


Not always. Test it out sometime on routes you know well. I live in Forest Park, right off West Kemper close to Hamilton Avenue. I was coming back from Louisville last night and I was just curious so I put in my home address when I was coming across the bridge from Kentucky. It told me the fastest route was to take 74 and then Colerain up to 275 and then over to Hamilton Ave. That might be the shortest route as far as mileage goes, but any sensible person knows you don't make good time going up Colerain from 74 to 275. It's just as quick to stay on the highway. It's more miles but you don't have to deal with the traffic lights either. That's my major beef. The darn thing always just picks the shortest distance when I want to stay on the interstate as much as possible. That's why I always read the route ahead of time and make necessary changes if needed.

Unassisted
10-15-2008, 11:59 PM
My GPS was indispensable when I moved here, a city I'd visited for all of 5 days prior to the move. I still depend on it mightily when I visit places I've never been. When I went to Pittsburgh this year, I used it to walk from my hotel to the ballpark. When I got to the ballpark, I stuck it in my pocket. At the end of the game, I dug it out for the return trip and found the battery was dead! Thanks to wrong turns and bad guesses, it took me 3x as long to fumble around in the dark and find my way back to the hotel. Next time I'll carry a map, too. :)

The device I resisted for years was satellite radio. I couldn't accept the idea of paying for radio. Now that I have it, I couldn't bear to give it up.

RichRed
10-16-2008, 09:24 AM
I don't have GPS but I can definitely see the benefit of having it. Texting, on the other hand, is something I have absolutely no use for.

durl
10-16-2008, 10:28 AM
I'm fighting the urge to get a GPS for my Treo. I don't really "need" it because I don't do a lot of travelling, but I'd still like to have one.

I recently surrendered and got a texting plan. Now I have to send more than 30 messages a month to justify the additional cost. :)

Highlifeman21
10-16-2008, 11:01 AM
Not always. Test it out sometime on routes you know well. I live in Forest Park, right off West Kemper close to Hamilton Avenue. I was coming back from Louisville last night and I was just curious so I put in my home address when I was coming across the bridge from Kentucky. It told me the fastest route was to take 74 and then Colerain up to 275 and then over to Hamilton Ave. That might be the shortest route as far as mileage goes, but any sensible person knows you don't make good time going up Colerain from 74 to 275. It's just as quick to stay on the highway. It's more miles but you don't have to deal with the traffic lights either. That's my major beef. The darn thing always just picks the shortest distance when I want to stay on the interstate as much as possible. That's why I always read the route ahead of time and make necessary changes if needed.

Does your GPS have an option to switch between "Shortest Distance" and "Fastest Route"?

My fiancee has hers set on "Fastest Route". It has the option for "Shortest Distance", but you're absolutely correct that the shortest distance isn't always the quickest/fastest. I've found that it's more often than not it's definitely slower.

Best example I can give is when we go to her brother's place in Melrose, MA. If you set it on "fastest route", it takes you MA Pike to 95N to 93S to their exit. If you set it on "shortest distance", it takes you MA Pike to 95N to MA 2 East, to 93N, which is a much shorter distance than the fastest route, but the fastest route is at least 15 mins quicker.

princeton
10-16-2008, 11:14 AM
the other day, I drove to a soccer game using directions provided by club, then drove home using GPS.

the first drive was quiet and boring; the second one was exciting. I saw loose women, and a car on fire. It educated my children

is there a "no redlight district" setting on that GPS?

OldRightHander
10-16-2008, 11:55 AM
Does your GPS have an option to switch between "Shortest Distance" and "Fastest Route"?

My fiancee has hers set on "Fastest Route". It has the option for "Shortest Distance", but you're absolutely correct that the shortest distance isn't always the quickest/fastest. I've found that it's more often than not it's definitely slower.

Best example I can give is when we go to her brother's place in Melrose, MA. If you set it on "fastest route", it takes you MA Pike to 95N to 93S to their exit. If you set it on "shortest distance", it takes you MA Pike to 95N to MA 2 East, to 93N, which is a much shorter distance than the fastest route, but the fastest route is at least 15 mins quicker.

It is set on fastest route, but I wonder if it gets confused if a road like Colerain Ave is also a US Route with a number. Maybe it thinks a road with a route number is a wide open road.

*BaseClogger*
10-16-2008, 12:06 PM
the other day, I drove to a soccer game using directions provided by club, then drove home using GPS.

the first drive was quiet and boring; the second one was exciting. I saw loose women, and a car on fire. It educated my children

is there a "no redlight district" setting on that GPS?

:laugh:

The same thing happened to me when I was driving through Chicago...

RedsFan75
10-16-2008, 01:21 PM
Hey glad to see I'm not the only one with FULL albums on my IPOD.

;)

timmario66
10-16-2008, 02:11 PM
Hey glad to see I'm not the only one with FULL albums on my IPOD.

;)

I have plenty of albums on my Ipod. I downloaded my whole CD collection and update my Ipod now by reserving CDs at the library. I'm such a cheapskate.

PedroBourbon
10-16-2008, 02:43 PM
Hey glad to see I'm not the only one with FULL albums on my IPOD.

;)


Full albums + "shuffle" button on Ipod=hours of great listening uninterupted.

OldRightHander
10-16-2008, 02:54 PM
I can't bring myself to use the shuffle feature. I just pull up the albums and listen to them straight through the way they were meant to be listened to. To each his own though. I'm home right now and I've been scouring the house for CDs I might have missed. I found another 6 in a box in the basement, stuff I haven't listened to in years.

remdog
10-16-2008, 09:01 PM
Regarding texting:

Just yesterday I had a kid on a bicycle (appeared to be about 12 or 13) peddle through an interesection against a green light. If I hadn't slamed on the brakes he would have never finished that text; thank goodness there was no one behind me.

California has done the prudent thing and outlawed talking on hand-held cell phones. Next up: texting while driving.

Rem

OldRightHander
10-16-2008, 10:05 PM
Regarding texting:

Just yesterday I had a kid on a bicycle (appeared to be about 12 or 13) peddle through an interesection against a green light. If I hadn't slamed on the brakes he would have never finished that text; thank goodness there was no one behind me.

California has done the prudent thing and outlawed talking on hand-held cell phones. Next up: texting while driving.

Rem

I've seen some bizarre stuff on the roads. Looking down into cars can be scary sometimes. The whole hand held phone thing baffles me. If you can afford a cell phone, surely you can afford a bluetooth device. Some of them are pretty inexpensive right now. I have a bluetooth and voice activated dialing. I hardly even have to touch the phone while I'm driving. I'm getting to the point where I think maybe they should start making cell phones without a speaker and sell them with an accompanying ear piece so the only way you can use it is hands free.

But the texting thing is beyond me. Why in the world do you need to do that when you can talk to the person?

RFS62
10-16-2008, 10:16 PM
Pikers.

RedsFan75
10-16-2008, 11:06 PM
But the texting thing is beyond me. Why in the world do you need to do that when you can talk to the person?

My daughter at college was texting me, and after 2 I called her. I asked why Text, when we can talk.... Her response... " I don't know, just what I was doing, so I just texted you."

:eek::D

I'd much rather hear her voice than get a cryptic line of letters that I have to decypher!

macro
10-16-2008, 11:35 PM
Around here, a GPS will occasionally take you down a goat path unfit for any vehicle that cannot compete in the Baja 1000.

...or into the path of a speeding train (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/01/nyregion/01gps.html?ref=nyregion).

SandyD
10-17-2008, 12:42 AM
I actually like texting...much preferred over voice mail.

Kind of got used to it when that was the ONLY WAY to make contact with family and friends after Katrina.

Tho I send/receive only dozens in a month rather than hundreds, and I don't use a lot of the shorthand. During a busy day, I'd rather text someone "dinner tonight?" or "i'm running late" than leave a voice mail. Even "call me" rather than leaving voice mail.

I use it sort of like a portable email, I guess.

I have NO INTEREST in getting a GPS device. I like using maps/mapquest/google maps, etc.

Chip R
10-17-2008, 09:22 AM
But the texting thing is beyond me. Why in the world do you need to do that when you can talk to the person?


Sometimes you are in an area where you can't make a call or you are in roaming and texting is better. Other times you are in a noisy place and you can't hear the person calling. Also you may not want to get a call because you don't want your phone to ring. Perhaps you are over your minutes for the month and a text message doesn't cost you anything. Sometimes texting is just more convienent.

westofyou
10-17-2008, 09:35 AM
My daughter at college was texting me, and after 2 I called her. I asked why Text, when we can talk.... Her response... " I don't know, just what I was doing, so I just texted you."

:eek::D

I'd much rather hear her voice than get a cryptic line of letters that I have to decypher!

My 72 year old father texts more than me or my brother combined, it's how he keeps up with my younger sister that's for sure. I like to text to avoid the phone call, I talk enough on the phone at work myself, so sometimes texting just gets the facts in and the rest out of the way.

Ltlabner
10-17-2008, 10:37 AM
But the texting thing is beyond me. Why in the world do you need to do that when you can talk to the person?

Mostly because I don't actually want to talk to that person.

As WOY pointed out, I spend my whole work day talking on the phone to people I'd really don't care about. So hopping on the phone and just chatting away doesn't really apeal to me after 5:00pm.

Besides, it's WAY faster to text someone. You can get the info too them in about 3 seconds and it's done. "Hey, meet me in the lobby in 20 minutes"...blamo done.

If you call, you have to dial the number, wait for it to ring, get their voice mail because they are on the phone, listen to their long-winded message explaining every detail of where they are and how to contact them, then finally get to leave a message that says, "hey, meet me in the lobby in 20 minutes".

Then that poor fool has to go check his voice mail, dial the numbers, listen to your message and then call you back. Likely they will get your voicemail and repeat the process.

No YOU have to go through all the steps to listen to their message to hear "ok".

A text is simply far more effecient and precludes the useless chatter that can erupt during a phone conversation.

dfs
10-17-2008, 10:52 AM
But the texting thing is beyond me. Why in the world do you need to do that when you can talk to the person?

I suspect you've got a couple extra years on me, but just a couple. I once thought this way. There are times when you want a short burst of communication and it's all one way.

My kid got home safe...a text can tell me that at a concert without making me leave the hall.
My family wants to encourage me about a contest...a text can do that without interrupting my preperation.

It's a one way communication. It's limited in scope. It's temporarily archived. It's not a replacement for a real conversation over a phone. It's something...a bit different.

Sea Ray
10-17-2008, 11:11 AM
The best use I've ever had for my GPS was when I traveled to Hawaii. The roads there generally have these huge Polynesian names that are very difficult to pronounce, let alone remember so rather than try to get directions from someone I just plugged in my destination and let the GPS direct me. Not every city is a grid with a Main St and a 1st, 2nd 3rd street...

Sea Ray
10-17-2008, 11:17 AM
I suspect you've got a couple extra years on me, but just a couple. I once thought this way. There are times when you want a short burst of communication and it's all one way.

My kid got home safe...a text can tell me that at a concert without making me leave the hall.
My family wants to encourage me about a contest...a text can do that without interrupting my preperation.

It's a one way communication. It's limited in scope. It's temporarily archived. It's not a replacement for a real conversation over a phone. It's something...a bit different.


I'm above the avg age of users of this site but I enjoy texting. It saves me the fluff talk and gets right to the point. It also leaves everything in writing. If my office tells me I have a 9am appt tomorrow I won't show up at 10am and have an argument over what I was told. My parents tend to have long, drawn out conversations. It's rare to have a sub 30min phone call with them. Sometimes I don't have 30 minutes to spare so I text them what I need to have covered like what time is dinner?...

SeeinRed
10-17-2008, 12:19 PM
I recently ordered a GPS for myself off of EBay. It is coming from China. I don't know how many on here have ordered from China, but tracking through EMS has been frustrating. I think they may need that GPS more than I do. I spent around 100 bucks for it and it had free shipping so I'm not going to complain. It is an OEM GPS. I would have never thought about gettting one if I had not used my brother's one day. I'm not afraid of being lost, and I have driven delivery trucks and worked for TWC enough to find my way around. Its just a convenience thing. After having to use maps and such for work, I want to be able to just go on my free time.

While I'm on this subject, does anyone have any experience dealing with EMS tracking? I used the tracking number at USPS and all it says is foreign acceptance. I expected shipping to take a little longer because of customs, but not being able to track it too often is getting to me. EMS China gave me this bit of insight:

2008-10-15 17:45:00 City of Beijing Posting
2008-10-15 17:47:00 shangdiyingyunbu Despatch from Sorting Center

Where the heck is shangdiyingyumbu anyway? USPS says:

Status: Foreign Acceptance

Your item was accepted on October 15, 2008 at 5:45 PM. Information, if available, is updated every evening. Please check again later.

I'm pulling my hair out right now from just not knowing. My how all this technology has made us impatient. Remember when you just waited for a package to arrive, or when you had to mail off something to get a package back. That took forever.

Roy Tucker
10-17-2008, 01:40 PM
I'm a texting guy too. For short, logistical type things, its great.

We have 3 active teens (well, my son is 20 but acts like a teen) that are often out and about. They text us when they are leaving/arriving at places, working late, plans change, status changes, etc etc.

No need to have a conversation about it, just FYI kinds of info getting communicated. If there are any issues, I then call them.

However, I still use complete sentences, punctuation, and appropriate caps when texting. I'm not a OMG U R GR8 kind of guy.

Don't have a MP3 player, mostly because I just don't listen to music as much as I used to. I have thought about getting one for the car to replace storing CDs in the car.

Cyclone792
10-17-2008, 02:05 PM
I was looking at GPS units a few months back but held off after thinking long and hard about the question "do I really need it, or do I just want it?" Then I went several weeks without ever coming across a scenario where I needed it so the thought of getting one kind of fell off the radar.

Of course, Wednesday the highways were clogged and I had to take a back road detour to get to work. A GPS would have been useful then if I had one, because I'd probably have found a faster detour than the one I knew. Then yesterday I had to print driving directions out to follow. And again today I'm going to an unfamiliar place and once again have a printout of driving directions.

I may start rethinking that GPS question as one would be coming in quite handy this week.

Highlifeman21
10-17-2008, 03:20 PM
I was looking at GPS units a few months back but held off after thinking long and hard about the question "do I really need it, or do I just want it?" Then I went several weeks without ever coming across a scenario where I needed it so the thought of getting one kind of fell off the radar.

Of course, Wednesday the highways were clogged and I had to take a back road detour to get to work. A GPS would have been useful then if I had one, because I'd probably have found a faster detour than the one I knew. Then yesterday I had to print driving directions out to follow. And again today I'm going to an unfamiliar place and once again have a printout of driving directions.

I may start rethinking that GPS question as one would be coming in quite handy this week.

I hear ya on the want vs need.

Would I like (want) my own GPS? Sure.
Do I need my own GPS? Probably not.

With my fiancee having one, if we're going somewhere together, we'll take hers. If I'm going somewhere alone, I feel confident in my ability to print out directions, or just find my way on my own.

Eventually, if they become more affordable (and so far they are, but not to my liking), I'll pull the trigger on one.

In my experience, they do enhance the travel experience, and are useful, but right now are just too expensive for me to justify the cost.

Unassisted
10-17-2008, 04:06 PM
I'm not a heavy consumer of 2-way texting, since my teens don't do it and I don't have a wide social circle. The way I do use it is to receive information automatically rather than to communicate it with others. Between various alert services and Gmail's forwarding filters, I get a couple of dozen texts a day with things that are interesting or useful to me.

OldRightHander
10-17-2008, 04:30 PM
To clarify the whole texting thing. My wife and I use it occasionally to get pertinent information across, like she's giving me the phone number of a broker who has a hot load, or I have a weak signal and I can get a text through when the call won't go through. But what I really don't get is the current trend of people carrying on entire conversations back and forth with text messages. At that point, just call the person for Pete's sake. You have all the fluff you normally get with a voice conversation, but with a string of unintelligible capital letters and shorthand. I'm with Roy. Proper punctuation and spelling is the order of the day.