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View Full Version : Failure to be successful...(my career vent)



bthomasiscool
01-19-2009, 05:41 PM
Just looking to vent for a second and get any type of feedback/advice.

I am two years removed from graduating college with a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration. Currently living in good ol' Lexington, Kentucky

First Job out of college: Dillard's, Sales Associate/Management Intern for Men's department. Lasted 4 months, not worth working 6 days a week @10.00 an hour. (No time with wife at all/Retail jobs not for me).

2nd job out of college: I worked for a start-up chain called the K.I.S. Country Club and Golf Academy. The job was straight commission, very challenging trying to convince families to sign up for a 5,500-11,500 membership for a "lifetime" of golf INDOORS. While certain aspects of the membership were a good idea it turns out the job was a giant Ponzi Scheme, recently the place filed for bankruptcy, the FBI is involved, and now thousands of members including my wife and I through out the U.S are let with an average of 6,000 debt for a out of business/bankrupt country club.

Currently: I am currently working as a "telesales representative/account manager" for a security product distributor. The job started out okay. While the base pay was not good (12.50) an hour, I was able to make solid commissions every month in order to make ends meet. Just like many others the economy is greatly affecting my territory and the numbers are way down. As of January 1st the company cut the old commission plan and implemented a new "bonus" program (close to impossible to make anything). So now I'm pretty much working for a base of 12.50 an hour in a job where my degree doesn't make a difference, and advancement is really ever a possibility. The past few months, commissions have not been paid on time and have been nickel and dimed to death. Now the bonuses are not guaranteed and there is no longer a specific pay schedule listed (no clue when we'll get paid them).

I'm currently waiting to here back from a large medical company to work as a endoscopy specialist at a local hospital. It seems like an awesome (but high stress job), with a lot of potential for advancement. It's currently my only hope of getting out of this disaster job.

I've gotten a lot of "you have to start at the bottom and work your way up lines", which I have no problem with. In my previous three jobs that is what I've tried. Unsuccessfully. I don't think it is unfair trying to find a job that pays a college graduate 30,000k a year? Correct me if I'm wrong.

I'm currently in a monster career rut with no guidance, and no path in life. I really just want to find a satisfying job that I can somewhat enjoy. Is there any hope out there?

Let's Vent!!!:beerme:

Ltlabner
01-19-2009, 05:52 PM
At the risk of sounding very over simplified, what is it you'd like to do?

All three of your previous jobs were sales related. Do you want to stay in that vein or go in a different direction?

bthomasiscool
01-19-2009, 05:56 PM
I think sales is something I enjoy doing, definitely not inside sales though. I've always wanted to get into the medical field (wish I would have gotten a nursing degree to be honest), so I'm hoping this other job opportunity works out.

Sales is all I know though. It's what my dad has done his whole life, as well as myself (I also held a part-time sales job while going to school). So I really haven't ever given anything else a chance. (except Mcdonalds when I was 15).

My one true passion is sports. Football, Baseball, Basketball, and golf.

MasonBuzz3
01-19-2009, 06:00 PM
while its a difficult industry to break into, you may want to look into working in sales for a sports team. there is nothing better than walking into a stadium or ballpark instead of your everyday office building.

Ltlabner
01-19-2009, 06:06 PM
I think sales is something I enjoy doing, definitely not inside sales though. I've always wanted to get into the medical field (wish I would have gotten a nursing degree to be honest), so I'm hoping this other job opportunity works out.

Sales is all I know though. It's what my dad has done his whole life, as well as myself (I also held a part-time sales job while going to school).

This is just opinion, so take it for what you are paying for it.

Don't put all your hopes on one "dream job". Apply and interview for as many jobs as you can find related to your field/interests. That way if your dream job falls through you don't have to start all over again.

Also, the more interviews you go on, the more polished you will become.

Medical equipment sales is a great field, but is highly competitive and difficult to get into. They are high stress but high reward ($$$$). Have you interviewed with that company as yet?

You might consider getting a job working for an industrial supply distributor like Applied Industrial or Motion Industries. While not medical equipment you'd learn a lot about sales very quickly. They sell things like motors, pumps, gears, belts, bearings and electrical control products. They sell both to manufacturers of products (OEM) and in-house maintenance operations (MRO).

Working for a distributor you'd call on a wide verity of customers in different fields. This does a couple of things. One, you learn to sell to a wide array of customers. Two, you learn to sell to customers big and small (very important IMO). Three, you will learn a little knowledge about a lot of industries. Fourth, you will work with sales reps of the products you distribute (like me) this gives you more knowledge and exposure to more jobs. Lastly, it might expose you to a field that really lights your fire.

Distributor sales jobs are not glamorous sales jobs. But you can make the money you described (lots more if you hustle). More importantly, it will give you the skills you need to get into the better sales jobs.

If that sounds like it might be a possibility let me know and I'll give you some tips on how to stand out if you apply for a job at one.

Hope this helps on some weird level.

Falls City Beer
01-19-2009, 06:08 PM
Stay away from sales. And never ever hand over money to an employer. Get them to give it to *you*.

That said, that leaves open a ton of opportunities, even in a bad economy. If you want to make decent money fairly quickly, teach. That will give you time to consider what other job avenues you might want to take.

Red in Chicago
01-19-2009, 07:08 PM
Stay away from sales. And never ever hand over money to an employer. Get them to give it to *you*.

That said, that leaves open a ton of opportunities, even in a bad economy. If you want to make decent money fairly quickly, teach. That will give you time to consider what other job avenues you might want to take.

FCB, since bthomis stated that he has "just" has a BBA, what would he need to do in order to become a teacher? I guess what I'm asking is, what minimum requirements would he need in order to make this happen? I'm sure a great deal of that depends upon where you live and the level you plan to teach at, but just curious if you could shed some of your experience with us.

VR
01-19-2009, 07:32 PM
It's a tough market out there, so be wary of 'how much you think you should make'
Sometimes you have to realize you're going to have to take less than ideal $, but if it's an organization that needs good people....you have to look at it as an opportunity to make your own breaks.

As an employer, who started at the very very bottom, I'd encourage you to have that perspective, and them commit. Be the 1st one there, the hardest worker, the one that gives praise to peers, the positive attitude. As an employer, I've just described an ideal employee...and the one I'm going to promote first.

Too many (most) employees come to a job feeling they are 'owed' by someone or by the employer, and are very guarded in their level of participation. Entitlement is a guarantee that you'll never be happy w/ what you make, ever.

It will usually take 6 days and 60 hours to get the next level. I get your retail comments, not liking it is a good excuse to move on. But I will promise you one thing. No successful business person ever worked 5 days and 40 hours and is now highly successful. Ever. Not in the business world.

That said, my advice is to set low expectations right now for earning, especially in this economy. But be prepared to roll up your sleeves, and give everything you have got to make your employer successful. A very large % of today's workforce is lazy, entitled, negative, and more work for an employer.

Good luck, and keep your head up!

Falls City Beer
01-19-2009, 10:53 PM
FCB, since bthomis stated that he has "just" has a BBA, what would he need to do in order to become a teacher? I guess what I'm asking is, what minimum requirements would he need in order to make this happen? I'm sure a great deal of that depends upon where you live and the level you plan to teach at, but just curious if you could shed some of your experience with us.

He'd need certification if he wanted to teach for a long time. I got certified before I taught high school. I got my certification in roughly one calendar year: summer session, followed by fall, by spring. Classes were a waste of time, but it was good secure work while it lasted. I've since moved on.

I suspect he could apply for a math position even without certification, provisionally. So, he could get his certification or search for other work while he's provisional--or both. A lot of districts are short on math and science teachers.

forfreelin04
01-20-2009, 12:44 AM
Just looking to vent for a second and get any type of feedback/advice.

I am two years removed from graduating college with a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration. Currently living in good ol' Lexington, Kentucky

First Job out of college: Dillard's, Sales Associate/Management Intern for Men's department. Lasted 4 months, not worth working 6 days a week @10.00 an hour. (No time with wife at all/Retail jobs not for me).

2nd job out of college: I worked for a start-up chain called the K.I.S. Country Club and Golf Academy. The job was straight commission, very challenging trying to convince families to sign up for a 5,500-11,500 membership for a "lifetime" of golf INDOORS. While certain aspects of the membership were a good idea it turns out the job was a giant Ponzi Scheme, recently the place filed for bankruptcy, the FBI is involved, and now thousands of members including my wife and I through out the U.S are let with an average of 6,000 debt for a out of business/bankrupt country club.

Currently: I am currently working as a "telesales representative/account manager" for a security product distributor. The job started out okay. While the base pay was not good (12.50) an hour, I was able to make solid commissions every month in order to make ends meet. Just like many others the economy is greatly affecting my territory and the numbers are way down. As of January 1st the company cut the old commission plan and implemented a new "bonus" program (close to impossible to make anything). So now I'm pretty much working for a base of 12.50 an hour in a job where my degree doesn't make a difference, and advancement is really ever a possibility. The past few months, commissions have not been paid on time and have been nickel and dimed to death. Now the bonuses are not guaranteed and there is no longer a specific pay schedule listed (no clue when we'll get paid them).

I'm currently waiting to here back from a large medical company to work as a endoscopy specialist at a local hospital. It seems like an awesome (but high stress job), with a lot of potential for advancement. It's currently my only hope of getting out of this disaster job.

I've gotten a lot of "you have to start at the bottom and work your way up lines", which I have no problem with. In my previous three jobs that is what I've tried. Unsuccessfully. I don't think it is unfair trying to find a job that pays a college graduate 30,000k a year? Correct me if I'm wrong.

I'm currently in a monster career rut with no guidance, and no path in life. I really just want to find a satisfying job that I can somewhat enjoy. Is there any hope out there?

Let's Vent!!!:beerme:

BThomas,

I saw the same think happening to me and I decided to reinvest in my education instead of trying to "move" up in a rough job market. Currently, I am a TA at a local university and subbing in High Schools on the side. My main focus is getting my MBA full time. I'm not sure if you have children or if your wife has a job that affords you the opportunity to start taking classes, but it's something you should look into. Even if the MBA takes you 5 years, it looks much better on a resume to say your (at least) attempting higher education.

I graduated undergrad with a teaching degree and 6 months was enough for me to realize that it was not going to get me squat financially in the long run. I thought the intrinsic perks of teaching would be enough to quell my desires to set my family on a financial path of success. Sadly, the things teachers go through, besides just the daily stresses, was not enough to keep me from wanting more.

The way I see it, the less ruts you put yourself in with education the better. An undergrad degree is simply not the same key it was 5-10 and especially 20 years ago. The main reason people stop at undergrad is the one (the money) and two (the time.) With the economy being in bad shape, the interest rates on loans are relatively cheap and if you have an MBA or start one, the job market will raise its ceiling for you. Hopefully, giving you a job where you can afford to pay back loans and start really saving for a healthy and long retirement. As far as the time, you can make time. Most MBA colleges offer full degrees online, the college I'm attending would even let you obtain a degree while living in OHIO even when the college itself is in SC. PM if you would like more details. Just my two cents....

Johnny Footstool
01-20-2009, 01:44 AM
He'd need certification if he wanted to teach for a long time. I got certified before I taught high school. I got my certification in roughly one calendar year: summer session, followed by fall, by spring. Classes were a waste of time, but it was good secure work while it lasted. I've since moved on.

I suspect he could apply for a math position even without certification, provisionally. So, he could get his certification or search for other work while he's provisional--or both. A lot of districts are short on math and science teachers.

I don't know about Kentucky, but some Kansas school districts have programs that allow uncertified individuals to take a crash-course summer certification session, and then begin teaching in the fall while working towards a teaching degree.

Stephenk29
01-20-2009, 02:43 AM
In the event that the school has an emergency situation you can get a provisional certificate. This will almost always ONLY be in math areas. If you do get this sort of thing they will probably require you to get your teaching certificate within one year and then begin working on a continued education. The state of Kentucky also requires that you pass three tests to receive your full certification. Sounds like a lot, but its really not to terrible. You can knock out three tests in two Saturdays.

SandyD
01-20-2009, 09:11 AM
I think sales is something I enjoy doing, definitely not inside sales though. I've always wanted to get into the medical field (wish I would have gotten a nursing degree to be honest), so I'm hoping this other job opportunity works out.

Sales is all I know though. It's what my dad has done his whole life, as well as myself (I also held a part-time sales job while going to school). So I really haven't ever given anything else a chance. (except Mcdonalds when I was 15).

My one true passion is sports. Football, Baseball, Basketball, and golf.

It's not too late, if that's what you want to do. Seriously. Since you already have a degree, you would probably have to take just a few classes before applying to nursing school.

Roy Tucker
01-20-2009, 09:34 AM
The best piece of advice I ever got was "do what you enjoy doing and the money will come". Don't chase money. You're a young man. It took me till about the age of 30 to really figure out what I wanted in life re: job, family, etc.. This is the time in your life to try things.

There is some good and practical advice in this thread. I've always said to carpet bomb your resume. Get it in front of as many eyeballs as you can. Don't just mail in your resume. Find out who the first-line contact person is (usually HR) and call them. If you can find out the hiring manager, call them. Establish a relationship with them. Find out about jobs before they hit all the job web sites. Find out if there are any related professional organizations in your field and go to the meetings. Meet people there (print up a personal business card). Use socal networking web sites liked LinkedIn and cultivate and nourish your business contacts. Lots of people are willing to meet for 7 AM coffee at Starbucks (you buy) to talk about their field, what's going on, and potential openings. Be willing to go the extra mile. If you can think of something to do, do it, don't wait. Jobs are out there even in this brutal economy.

And be patient. Stick with something for a while. Show a little persistence. Sometimes it takes a while to turn a situation around.

Johnny Footstool
01-20-2009, 10:30 AM
My wife works in human resources, and she used to get hundreds of resumes every day.

According to her, carpet-bombing your resume is a good idea, but don't send out a hundred copies of the same resume. You really need to tailor it to every position you're applying for and every employer you send it do. Take 15-20 minutes and revise your resume to fit the job opening. And include cover letters that are specific to each job opening. Yes, you'll have hundreds of versions of your resume, but you'll also dramatically increase your chances of that resume being read.

cincrazy
01-20-2009, 01:35 PM
Just looking to vent for a second and get any type of feedback/advice.

I am two years removed from graduating college with a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration. Currently living in good ol' Lexington, Kentucky

First Job out of college: Dillard's, Sales Associate/Management Intern for Men's department. Lasted 4 months, not worth working 6 days a week @10.00 an hour. (No time with wife at all/Retail jobs not for me).

2nd job out of college: I worked for a start-up chain called the K.I.S. Country Club and Golf Academy. The job was straight commission, very challenging trying to convince families to sign up for a 5,500-11,500 membership for a "lifetime" of golf INDOORS. While certain aspects of the membership were a good idea it turns out the job was a giant Ponzi Scheme, recently the place filed for bankruptcy, the FBI is involved, and now thousands of members including my wife and I through out the U.S are let with an average of 6,000 debt for a out of business/bankrupt country club.

Currently: I am currently working as a "telesales representative/account manager" for a security product distributor. The job started out okay. While the base pay was not good (12.50) an hour, I was able to make solid commissions every month in order to make ends meet. Just like many others the economy is greatly affecting my territory and the numbers are way down. As of January 1st the company cut the old commission plan and implemented a new "bonus" program (close to impossible to make anything). So now I'm pretty much working for a base of 12.50 an hour in a job where my degree doesn't make a difference, and advancement is really ever a possibility. The past few months, commissions have not been paid on time and have been nickel and dimed to death. Now the bonuses are not guaranteed and there is no longer a specific pay schedule listed (no clue when we'll get paid them).

I'm currently waiting to here back from a large medical company to work as a endoscopy specialist at a local hospital. It seems like an awesome (but high stress job), with a lot of potential for advancement. It's currently my only hope of getting out of this disaster job.

I've gotten a lot of "you have to start at the bottom and work your way up lines", which I have no problem with. In my previous three jobs that is what I've tried. Unsuccessfully. I don't think it is unfair trying to find a job that pays a college graduate 30,000k a year? Correct me if I'm wrong.

I'm currently in a monster career rut with no guidance, and no path in life. I really just want to find a satisfying job that I can somewhat enjoy. Is there any hope out there?

Let's Vent!!!:beerme:

I'm in much the same boat you are. I've had difficulties since graduating from college with a bachelor's degree in journalism. Keep plowing ahead though, and keep fighting. I've recently decided to go back to school to pursue a teaching degree. I've been substituting lately, and I really enjoy it, and I'm excited about this new opportunity.

Don't let the stress of the situation overbear you. It's tough times for many right now. If you keep fighting and working hard, at some point you will get your break, whether it be a month, a year, or five years from now.

Good luck :)

TeamSelig
01-20-2009, 03:11 PM
I graduate in May with a BS. I'm really worried about getting a solid job after school. I've already started applying, but no luck so far.

Falls City Beer
01-20-2009, 03:55 PM
Also, get a friend who's a whiz at drafting a quality letter/resume to look at your material and help you write a thorough and polished CV. Most HR people *do* read for facility with language and writing skills.

Don't just write an error-free document, write a letter that demonstrates you're a person with ideas who has the ability to convey those ideas.

cincrazy
01-20-2009, 06:42 PM
I graduate in May with a BS. I'm really worried about getting a solid job after school. I've already started applying, but no luck so far.

Don't get discouraged right away, it takes some time. Just keep plugging away. If they see you're hard working and willing to bust your tail on a daily basis, you're more likely to get an opportunity than someone that thinks they should have the job handed to them on a silver platter.

SandyD
01-21-2009, 05:03 AM
If you need a little extra money, your minor league baseball team will be seeking seasonal employees pretty soon. They'll probably interview in Feb. You won't make a lot, but it's not bad for a "second job" without a long term committment.

Playadlc
01-21-2009, 05:30 AM
I think sales is something I enjoy doing, definitely not inside sales though. I've always wanted to get into the medical field (wish I would have gotten a nursing degree to be honest), so I'm hoping this other job opportunity works out.

Sales is all I know though. It's what my dad has done his whole life, as well as myself (I also held a part-time sales job while going to school). So I really haven't ever given anything else a chance. (except Mcdonalds when I was 15).

My one true passion is sports. Football, Baseball, Basketball, and golf.

Have you thought about going back and getting a nursing degree? My wife is currently in a nursing program at a local school here and she will have her RN in 2.5 years. While these programs can be tough to get in (my wife's school only took 40 people out of 420 applicants) the fact that you already have a degree should give you a leg up on most of the field.

Don't settle, man. Go for what you want. People laughed at me when I got out of school and decided to be a professional poker player. Well, it's been three years and that was easily the best decision in my professional life.

Good luck, bro.

Deepred05
01-28-2009, 11:37 AM
Ever thought about casino management? Having a degree almost always results in a six figure income. I find it interesting work, having met more stars and politicians and unbelievable characters that would fill up this thread.