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TheBurn
01-25-2009, 11:46 PM
Reports: Torre takes swings at Yankees in new book
-yahoo.com http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=ap-yankees-torrebook&prov=ap&type=lgns

NEW YORK (AP)—Joe Torre takes some harsh swings at Alex Rodriguez, Brian Cashman and the New York Yankees in a book due out early next month, according to New York newspaper reports.

“The Yankee Years” reveals that Rodriguez was called “A-Fraud” by his teammates and the star slugger developed an obsession with shortstop Derek Jeter, the New York Post and the Daily News reported Sunday.

Torre, who managed the Yankees from 1996-2007 before taking over the Los Angeles Dodgers last season, also says he was betrayed by Cashman, New York’s longtime general manager, the Daily News reported on its Web site.

Torre had a hot-and-cold relationship with Yankees ownership, including George Steinbrenner, but Cashman was thought to be a consistent ally.

At the annual New York baseball writers’ dinner Sunday night, Cashman told reporters that Torre called him earlier in the day.

“I woke up today and saw the newspapers and I was surprised. My first reaction is to wait to hear or see what’s in the book,” Cashman was quoted as saying on Newsday’s Web site, adding that he was “comfortable” with his relationship with Torre. “I’m glad Joe gave me a call from Hawaii. It certainly made me feel better about what I was reading today.”

The book, co-authored by Sports Illustrated’s Tom Verducci, is due out Feb. 3 and is being published by Doubleday. It is not a first-person account but instead a third-person narrative by Verducci based on dozens of interviews with Yankees players and employees, ESPN.com reported, citing an unidentified source.

In the book, Torre also says Steinbrenner learned the manager had prostate cancer (during spring training 1999) before Torre even had a chance to inform him.

Torre guided the Yankees to the postseason in all 12 years as manager and won four World Series titles from 1996-2000. But he was offered a one-year contract with a pay cut after the 2007 season, following New York’s third straight first-round playoff exit.

Torre turned down the proposal, saying he felt insulted by the offer of bonuses based on postseason performance. He soon agreed to a three-year contract with the Dodgers and led them to the NL championship series last year before they were eliminated by the Philadelphia Phillies, who went on to win the World Series.

NJReds
01-26-2009, 09:15 AM
Torre is known and respected as a class act. Even Mets fans (I can't speak for Red Sox fans) seemed to like the guy even though he was the manager of the hated Yankees.

This book could tarnish his image.

Johnny Footstool
01-26-2009, 09:57 AM
This book could tarnish his image.

...which is exactly what the Yankees would like.

princeton
01-26-2009, 10:03 AM
Torre is known and respected as a class act. Even Mets fans (I can't speak for Red Sox fans) seemed to like the guy even though he was the manager of the hated Yankees.

This book could tarnish his image.

elevate it, I figure.

Unassisted
01-26-2009, 10:11 AM
Since it's not a first-person narrative, IMO Torre's legacy in the Bronx will be safe.

NJReds
01-26-2009, 11:21 AM
elevate it, I figure.

Depends on what is attributed to him in the book.

RedEye
01-26-2009, 11:50 AM
A-Fraud developed an obsession with Derek Jeter?

Do tell!

blumj
01-26-2009, 12:09 PM
Torre is known and respected as a class act. Even Mets fans (I can't speak for Red Sox fans) seemed to like the guy even though he was the manager of the hated Yankees.

This book could tarnish his image.

Red Sox fans, too. I wonder how this might effect his relationships with the players on his team now.

WMR
01-26-2009, 12:28 PM
A-Fraud developed an obsession with Derek Jeter?

Do tell!

http://blog.nj.com/hobokennow/2007/08/SingleWhiteFemale.jpg

someone talented in photoshop could take that and run with it. :D

Emin3mShady07
01-26-2009, 03:00 PM
A-Fraud developed an obsession with Derek Jeter?

Do tell!

Must have been like Achilles "friendship" with Patrocles. With Achilles of course being A rod because he is the better player.

Hoosier Red
01-26-2009, 05:14 PM
Must have been like Achilles "friendship" with Patrocles. With Achilles of course being A rod because he is the better player.

All these quotes did was show the true fraud to be the Captain, Derek Jeter.

A-Rod is unquestionably sensitive, high strung, and demanding of himself. So what did Jeter and the cool kids do? Talk behind his back, play to his paranoia, and let the crowd eat him up while Jeter retained his golden boy image.

blumj
01-26-2009, 05:38 PM
All these quotes did was show the true fraud to be the Captain, Derek Jeter.

A-Rod is unquestionably sensitive, high strung, and demanding of himself. So what did Jeter and the cool kids do? Talk behind his back, play to his paranoia, and let the crowd eat him up while Jeter retained his golden boy image.

Every once in a while, something pops up to remind you that a lot of these guys are probably not that different from some of the dumb jocks a lot of us couldn't stand in high school.

princeton
01-26-2009, 05:53 PM
the entire world knows that Torre's great accomplishment was getting Yankees (from George on down) to row their oars in the same direction rather than use them to brain one another.

I doubt that this is a tell-all book, but it would have been disappointing to not illustrate some level of potential disfunctionality, and to show how that was handled.

15fan
01-27-2009, 11:36 AM
2001 - 2010, Alex Rodriguez made or will make over $20 million per year in his base salary to play baseball.

My guess is that Alex Rodriguez's reaction to all this is something like... :mooner:

Roy Tucker
01-27-2009, 01:12 PM
I'm a little surprised Torre would do a book like this and maybe a little disappointed.

I didn't think he had the kind of character that would tell tales out of school.

gonelong
01-27-2009, 01:22 PM
I'm a little surprised Torre would do a book like this and maybe a little disappointed.

I didn't think he had the kind of character that would tell tales out of school.

I'd be surprised if what is being reported hasn't been extrapolated/misconstrued from what is actually in the book. I'll bet the book is as Vanilla as the day is long.

GL

WMR
01-30-2009, 11:12 AM
Umm... Clemens... WOW.

More excerpts:

- Yanks owner George Steinbrenner was so--I don't know--cheap, or petty, or spoiled by victory that his scouts had to wait a full year to get their World Series rings after the 1999 season, and never got rings for the last year they won, in 2000, even though Steinbrenner pals like Billy Crystal did.

- After the Yanks came back to tie game 7 of the 2003 series against the Sox, closer Mariano Rivera ran off the bullpun mound to cry in the bathroom, from the sheer emotion of the game. Not a Yankee-hater moment, particularly, just a great window into what a crazy game it was, when even the iciest closer in baseball history was overcome. As Chris said, there's a whole lot of crying in the book, almost all of it by Yankees pitchers: by my count Rivera, John Habyan, Kevin Brown, Clemens, and Kyle Farnsworth were all reduced to tears at one point or another. Tom Gordon, on the other hand, just threw up.

- The greatest comic relief throughout is the Carl Pavano saga: The Pitcher Who Didn't Want to Pitch, which peaks either with Mike Mussina's offhand comment that the disabled list is now called the "15-Day Pavano," or with Pavano's girlfriend's line, when she calls to say Pavano can't make an offseason banquet: "Carl's not going to be able to make it. He wants me to tell you that he's sick, but he's not. But that's what he told me to say."

- Bullpen catcher Mike Borzello, giving his assessment of the first throwing session for Kei Igawa, the Japanese import the Yankees brought in for $46 million to compete with the Sox' signing of Dice-K Matsuzaka: "I hope he's either seriously hurt or badly hung over, so there's an explanation for throwing like that."

- Serial tough man Roger Clemens? Uncontrollable sobbing in the clubhouse during a game he was pitching in the World Series! This after his got all macho and threw a shard of bat in the direction of nemesis Mike Piazza.

- Mussina's comments about Rivera, "We're up 3-0 and Mo Rivera came in with the lead and lost it. He lost it again. As great as he is and it's amazing what he does, if you start the evaluation again since I got here, he has accomplished nothing in comparison to what he accomplished in the four years before. He blew the world series in '01. He lost the Boston series. He didn't lose it himself, but we had a chance to win it in the ninth and sweep them and he doesn't do it there."

- Roger Clemens as he prepared to face the Mets in Game 2 of the 2000 World Serious: Verducci writes that Clemens' usual pregame preparation included taking a whirlpool bath at the hottest temperature possible. "He'd come out looking like a lobster," Yankee trainer Steve Donahue told Verducci. Donahue would then rub hot liniment all over Clemens' body. "Then Donahue would rub the hottest possible liniment on his testicles," Verducci writes. "He'd start snorting like a bull," the trainer said. "That's when he was ready to pitch."

- Remember the story about Carlos Beltrán’s willingness to take a major discount to play for the Yankees instead of the Mets? Joe Torre tells why: “Beltrán wanted to come to us, so he could hide among the trees. Nobody wants to be that guy to lead.”

- Though he accuses Kevin Brown of “pitching stupid” by taking the ball in Game 7 of the 2004 A.L.C.S. despite an ailing back, Torre expresses more pity than anger at the troubled right-hander. “There were a lot of demons in this guy,” Torre says, and he mentions that after Brown allowed six runs in the first inning of this 2005 game, he stormed into the visitors clubhouse at Tropicana Field, curled up on the floor in a corner of a storage area and told Torre, “I’m going to go home.” Torre told Brown that if he did that -– if he quit on his teammates — he would never be welcomed back. Brown got up, fired his cellphone across the locker room, put his jersey back on and threw four more innings.

- Torre has a telling comment about George Steinbrenner’s mental state when recalling a meeting in Tampa, Fla., in September 2007. Steinbrenner’s health had clearly deteriorated, and Torre drew a comparison to “The Godfather“: “It’s not quite the same (as) when Don Corleone was shot and was recovering and was sitting in the garden. At least he was talking to his son in a very lucid way, explaining what was going to happen. I don’t think George had those capabilities.”

- "One time he (Bernie Williams) left Yankee Stadium after a night game and forgot his own child, who was playing video games," Tom Verducci writes. "When he reached home he realized his oversight and called up Andy Pettitte and said, 'Andy, can you bring him home?'''

- Interesting stuff on Pages 394 and 395 about Johnny Damon's physical and emotional struggles early in the 2007 season, when a leg injury sapped him of his enthusiasm and he began to annoy old-guard Yankees. In a private meeting, Torre told Damon, "The kind of player you've been your whole life is the player who goes out there and fully commits himself. You're not that kind of person now. It's easy to see that." To which Damon said, "I'm not sure I want to do this." The book says one teammate visited Torre and was near tears discussing Damon, saying, "Let's get rid of him. Guys can't stand him."

BCubb2003
01-30-2009, 11:16 PM
There's crying in baseball after all.

Phhhl
01-31-2009, 01:49 AM
What the hell is this guy doing? Why would an active major league manager waste any of his valuable time preparing for a championship baseball season by reflecting on soap opera fodder and publishing such inflamatory nonsense? I have always felt this guy hit the lottery when he got the Yankee job, and ranks just above Dusty Baker and Chuck Tanner as the biggest nincompoop ever to hold high office in this great game. He has the baseball IQ of a pet rock, but seems to be so full of himself that he couldn't handle his firing by the Yankees with anything remotely resembling the same "class" media outlets have been so eager to bestow in him for the last fifteen years. I have no doubt that he was jerked around by the Steinbrenners, many have and many will moving forward. But think about this... what if Sparky Anderson wrote a "tell all" rag about the Big Red Machine after Dick Wagner bent him over and deflowered him in front of the entire world in 1979, just like the Yankees did to poor ol' Joe? What if Sparky's feelings got hurt and he took advantage of his position? There are stories about that club that anyone who lives here and loves the Reds would rather suppress in the better interest of history. Noone cares about those stories today. Noone should, unless they wish to turn a buck from them.

Torre is an actor, not a manager, always has been. He was a damn good player, but he was an abject failure as a National League manager in St. Louis and Atlanta. This man can only manage when he is given a payroll that punches holes in the stratosphere. You and I or anyone with a copy of the official rule book and a modicum of intelligence could have enjoyed the same success with the exhorbitant amount of talent he was afforded in his managerial career. His sense of entitlement to exploit his good fortune in life to turn a buck with this book is disgusting. And, I hate the Yakees.

The Baumer
01-31-2009, 02:14 AM
How about those Dodgers, eh?

remdog
01-31-2009, 09:23 AM
I listened to Torre as a color man on the Angels broadcasts for several years. Best one I ever heard, knows how to play ball.

By all accounts he's an excellent handler of people and had to keep so many egos happy in NY that if they all had inflated at the same time the hot air would have raised Yankee Stadium years earlier.

The Reds should be so lucky as to have Joe Torre.

Rem

membengal
01-31-2009, 09:29 AM
The trainer rubbed what on where now?

Gracious.

Jpup
01-31-2009, 10:10 AM
The trainer rubbed what on where now?

Gracious.

I remember hearing that Clemens taught that to Jake Peavy during the last World Baseball Classic. They actually talked about it on TV.

membengal
01-31-2009, 10:27 AM
I don't recall Clemens telling Peavy to have the trainer do the application, though.

On list of jobs I am ever sorry I didn't have, "Yankees trainer" just fell to the bottom of the list.

WMR
01-31-2009, 11:54 AM
I remember hearing that Clemens taught that to Jake Peavy during the last World Baseball Classic. They actually talked about it on TV.

Apparently Peavy considered it, b/c Clemens is his idol, but never actually did it when he realized how uncomfortable it would make him on the mound.

Hap
01-31-2009, 02:11 PM
I don't recall Clemens telling Peavy to have the trainer do the application, though.

On list of jobs I am ever sorry I didn't have, "Yankees trainer" just fell to the bottom of the list.

My wife just put that job on the top of her list of jobs she wishes she had.

Playadlc
01-31-2009, 02:55 PM
What the hell is this guy doing? Why would an active major league manager waste any of his valuable time preparing for a championship baseball season by reflecting on soap opera fodder and publishing such inflamatory nonsense? I have always felt this guy hit the lottery when he got the Yankee job, and ranks just above Dusty Baker and Chuck Tanner as the biggest nincompoop ever to hold high office in this great game. He has the baseball IQ of a pet rock, but seems to be so full of himself that he couldn't handle his firing by the Yankees with anything remotely resembling the same "class" media outlets have been so eager to bestow in him for the last fifteen years. I have no doubt that he was jerked around by the Steinbrenners, many have and many will moving forward. But think about this... what if Sparky Anderson wrote a "tell all" rag about the Big Red Machine after Dick Wagner bent him over and deflowered him in front of the entire world in 1979, just like the Yankees did to poor ol' Joe? What if Sparky's feelings got hurt and he took advantage of his position? There are stories about that club that anyone who lives here and loves the Reds would rather suppress in the better interest of history. Noone cares about those stories today. Noone should, unless they wish to turn a buck from them.

Torre is an actor, not a manager, always has been. He was a damn good player, but he was an abject failure as a National League manager in St. Louis and Atlanta. This man can only manage when he is given a payroll that punches holes in the stratosphere. You and I or anyone with a copy of the official rule book and a modicum of intelligence could have enjoyed the same success with the exhorbitant amount of talent he was afforded in his managerial career. His sense of entitlement to exploit his good fortune in life to turn a buck with this book is disgusting. And, I hate the Yakees.

Totally agree with this. This is an embarrassing act by Joe Torre.

Highlifeman21
02-01-2009, 12:03 AM
Apparently rubbing IcyHot on your junk is a clever ruse when you're on the juice?

Phhhl
02-01-2009, 01:10 AM
I listened to Torre as a color man on the Angels broadcasts for several years. Best one I ever heard, knows how to play ball.

By all accounts he's an excellent handler of people and had to keep so many egos happy in NY that if they all had inflated at the same time the hot air would have raised Yankee Stadium years earlier.

The Reds should be so lucky as to have Joe Torre.

Rem

I wouldn't argue against what you say. But I have a different point of view. I have never personally seen or heard anything to suggest the man is anything more than a pure creation of media idolatry. I defy anyone to point to a particular proclivity he had as a manager of the priciest players in the land that actually resulted in more wins than the lofty number that could be expected by pure, unadulterated 14k attrition. David Wells and Gary Sheffield have done a number on the perception that he knew how to manage a team of men. I always kind of knew that Torre enjoyed a King's ransom by virtue of the pristine fortune of his employers, the Yankees. But, until he went all Alger Hiss on the Steinbrenners by publishing this book, who would have cared?

They say the favorite sport of Americans is tearing down it's heroes. I disagree. I prefer to think it is the more noble sport of exposing hypocracy. Joe Torre has done nothing in the last 15 years to illustrate more clearly what he is all about than writing this book. Still, I do believe he was not appreciated enough as a player.

The Baumer
02-01-2009, 01:31 AM
And all these years I thought Howard Stern was the anti-christ! :D

GAC
02-01-2009, 09:19 AM
How about Jay McGwire's new book about his older brother?

GAC
02-01-2009, 09:23 AM
Apparently rubbing IcyHot on your junk is a clever ruse when you're on the juice?

Being on the juice though had it's benefits from a trainer's perspective... small area of coverage. :cool:

He would have used Frank's if he really had the balls. Might have gotten a perfect game out of it too.

http://www.chilliworld.com/i/p/110.jpg

remdog
02-01-2009, 06:29 PM
I wouldn't argue against what you say. But I have a different point of view. I have never personally seen or heard anything to suggest the man is anything more than a pure creation of media idolatry. I defy anyone to point to a particular proclivity he had as a manager of the priciest players in the land that actually resulted in more wins than the lofty number that could be expected by pure, unadulterated 14k attrition. David Wells and Gary Sheffield have done a number on the perception that he knew how to manage a team of men. I always kind of knew that Torre enjoyed a King's ransom by virtue of the pristine fortune of his employers, the Yankees. But, until he went all Alger Hiss on the Steinbrenners by publishing this book, who would have cared?

They say the favorite sport of Americans is tearing down it's heroes. I disagree. I prefer to think it is the more noble sport of exposing hypocracy. Joe Torre has done nothing in the last 15 years to illustrate more clearly what he is all about than writing this book. Still, I do believe he was not appreciated enough as a player.

Why all the vittrol towards Torre? Did he kick your dog?

My observatins of Torre are that he's been a standup guy. If you don't agree, that's fine but those were pretty brutal attacks on someone that neither of us know.

Jim Bouton wrote a book called 'Ball Four'. That was certainly a 'tell all' expose so this isn't exactly a first for the Yankees, a team that has always invited intreigue and curiosity. David Wells and Gary (I'm making errors so I get traded) Sheffield aren't exactly good references.

You're welcome to your opinion but I'll keep mine.

I'm going to get off this topic now 'cause I have a high regard for most of your posts, Santo.

Rem

Phhhl
02-01-2009, 07:16 PM
Why all the vittrol towards Torre? Did he kick your dog?

My observatins of Torre are that he's been a standup guy. If you don't agree, that's fine but those were pretty brutal attacks on someone that neither of us know.

Jim Bouton wrote a book called 'Ball Four'. That was certainly a 'tell all' expose so this isn't exactly a first for the Yankees, a team that has always invited intreigue and curiosity. David Wells and Gary (I'm making errors so I get traded) Sheffield aren't exactly good references.

You're welcome to your opinion but I'll keep mine.

I'm going to get off this topic now 'cause I have a high regard for most of your posts, Santo.

Rem

First of all, I think he is extremely overrated as a manager and always has been. Second, this book has to be one of the dumbest ideas I have ever seen come to fruition, and that includes insidious plans like bank robberies and 10 cent beer night at old Commisky Park. You're Joe Torre, you have the entire world believing you are a genius that was royally screwed by the most despised ownership in pro sports and the whole world treats you like the western world's version of Ghandi. You're getting ready for a baseball season where your team looks to be the favorite to win your division. And what do you do? Climb into an overpopulated elevator and as soon as the door closes let the bigest stinker of your life.

I guess I do get passionate about stupidity. Overboard, maybe. I apologize. Thanks for your compliments about my other posts.