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cincrazy
02-18-2009, 12:16 AM
This question is aimed primarily at those in the education field, but even if you're not in the education field, feel free to throw in your 2 cents...

I graduated from OSU with a journalism degree in 2007. I'm returning to school spring quarter to pursue a social studies teacher license. I have a list of prereq's I need to complete before entering the masters program of education. My question was, would I be at a competitive disadvantage compared to other teachers if I did not pursue a history degree? Would that hurt me on the job market? Hurt me from a knowledge standpoint? Any insight or opinions would be helpful. An old high school teacher of mine strongly recommends getting a degree in history, and says that I can be a social studies teacher without one, but I'll be less of one. Financially, I'd really rather not tack on even more loans, but if it makes me that better off in the end, I'll have little choice I suppose. Thanks for any help! :thumbup:

DTCromer
02-18-2009, 08:44 AM
This question is aimed primarily at those in the education field, but even if you're not in the education field, feel free to throw in your 2 cents...

I graduated from OSU with a journalism degree in 2007. I'm returning to school spring quarter to pursue a social studies teacher license. I have a list of prereq's I need to complete before entering the masters program of education. My question was, would I be at a competitive disadvantage compared to other teachers if I did not pursue a history degree? Would that hurt me on the job market? Hurt me from a knowledge standpoint? Any insight or opinions would be helpful. An old high school teacher of mine strongly recommends getting a degree in history, and says that I can be a social studies teacher without one, but I'll be less of one. Financially, I'd really rather not tack on even more loans, but if it makes me that better off in the end, I'll have little choice I suppose. Thanks for any help! :thumbup:


I know here in Indiana, Social Studies teachers are a "dime-a-dozen." If you want to separate yourself a bit, coach. Also, with a journalism degree, I know journalism teachers who run the schools newspapers are hard to find. A school may give you an emergency license to do just that, but you'll have to do a bunch of other stuff for the newspaper stuff.

Honestly, the teacher market in the midwest is terrible no matter how good/bad the economy is. Education is one of the few markets protected, a little bit, by the economy. Either way, in a thriving one, it's still hard to fine one. I'm pretty close to moving to Texas to finding a regular teaching job because they're so scarce up here. Not to mention, I can't stand it from December - March up here.

bucksfan2
02-18-2009, 09:43 AM
I had a friend who had a teaching degree from Dayton and wanted to be a history teacher. I don't know if history was his only option or what. But he graduated in 06 and just landed a full time teaching job last year. The problem with being a high school history teacher is many of the schools football coaches teach some sort of history.

If you were looking at becoming a grade school history/social studies teacher I wouldn't look to major in history. In reality you could teach yourself the entire subject matter in the matter of a few days.

Caseyfan21
02-18-2009, 11:21 AM
A good friend of mine graduated from OSU last year (June 2008) with a degree in history. She is now in the master's degree program here at OSU in history to become a teacher. I know she student teaches at a school downtown and also takes classes as part of the program. If you had any specific questions about the program itself I could talk to her for you.

westofyou
02-18-2009, 11:37 AM
In reality you could teach yourself the entire subject matter in the matter of a few days. If you wanted to teach it poorly yes you could learn it in a matter of days.

hebroncougar
02-18-2009, 11:43 AM
No, you are absolutely more marketable than a "history" teacher. I have a SS degree, and can teach history, sociology, geography, and political science. I would highly recommend you also get some kind of certificate in special education. Like someone said, we are a dime a dozen. Anything you can do to get your foot in the door is a plus. I'd at least see how many more classes it would take to get a special ed. certificate, it will go a long way towards your initial employment. And later on, you can probably transfer into a strictly history type job. With the social studies certificate, you'll probably end up with at least a history minor.

cincrazy
02-18-2009, 11:50 AM
I appreciate the comments, thanks everyone.

forfreelin04
02-18-2009, 12:29 PM
This question is aimed primarily at those in the education field, but even if you're not in the education field, feel free to throw in your 2 cents...

I graduated from OSU with a journalism degree in 2007. I'm returning to school spring quarter to pursue a social studies teacher license. I have a list of prereq's I need to complete before entering the masters program of education. My question was, would I be at a competitive disadvantage compared to other teachers if I did not pursue a history degree? Would that hurt me on the job market? Hurt me from a knowledge standpoint? Any insight or opinions would be helpful. An old high school teacher of mine strongly recommends getting a degree in history, and says that I can be a social studies teacher without one, but I'll be less of one. Financially, I'd really rather not tack on even more loans, but if it makes me that better off in the end, I'll have little choice I suppose. Thanks for any help! :thumbup:

Cin,

I have a Social Studies degree. It does make you more marketable, but good luck finding a job after graduation! Everything is tough right now, but Ohio has over 50 colleges churning out Social Studies majors. If your flexible and can move, I reccomend a venture down South or out West where jobs are aplenty.

Honestly, if I were you, I would get a business education degree so you could either teach business in High Schools or get a regular job. That way, if the teaching thing doesn't work out right away, you could still find a job doing almost anything. Just a thought. PM me if you have further questions.

Stephenk29
02-18-2009, 07:28 PM
I have my History degree as well. I would recommend going ahead and getting it. You teach a lot more in history class than just WWII and the Civil War. I also have my Middle School Social Studies endorsement. Problem is so does everyone else. Its a rough market, especially in the tri-state area right now.

cumberlandreds
02-19-2009, 11:41 AM
No, you are absolutely more marketable than a "history" teacher. I have a SS degree, and can teach history, sociology, geography, and political science. I would highly recommend you also get some kind of certificate in special education. Like someone said, we are a dime a dozen. Anything you can do to get your foot in the door is a plus. I'd at least see how many more classes it would take to get a special ed. certificate, it will go a long way towards your initial employment. And later on, you can probably transfer into a strictly history type job. With the social studies certificate, you'll probably end up with at least a history minor.

Special Ed is the way to go. Loudoun County Va is where I live and my wife subs in their system. She subs for special ed classes mostly and lot of those don't have a regular teacher. I could get apply for a special ed teacher with my four year degree in Business Admin and be hired quickly as long as I agreed to take the special ed training within a couple of years.

westofyou
02-19-2009, 11:51 AM
Special Ed is the way to go.
Hard work, hard, hard work.

My wife works with young adults with special needs, it is a tough job that takes a little more out of you than the average teaching position.

smoke6
02-19-2009, 12:01 PM
X2 If you want to nail down a job right away be a SPECIAL EDUCATION teacher.
Where do you live? Anitoch University McGregor has a teacher ed/masters program. You won't need to go back for pre-recs and it takes 5 quarters.

cincrazy
02-19-2009, 01:41 PM
Hard work, hard, hard work.

My wife works with young adults with special needs, it is a tough job that takes a little more out of you than the average teaching position.

That's correct. My mom is an aide in a special ed class, and I have experience in a special ed class also. I'm currently a substitute teacher, and the special ed teacher at one of the high schools is the mother of one of my best friends, so any time she needs someone she gives me a call. I LOVE those kids to death, and it's my favorite classroom to sub in. But I see what the teachers go through, and I'm just not so sure I could do it.

For instance, the classroom that I help with, they have a girl who is very prone to seizures. Any sudden movement or loud noise can throw her into one. Yet, next school year, another girl who is very violent is coming into the classroom. Now obviously there is nothing that sweet girl can do about her condition, but it's VERY dangerous to put her and the other girl in the same room together. She throws chairs, she screams, she hits people. The safety and well being of both of the children is an issue, yet they have hardly a choice but to try and make it work.

cumberlandreds
02-19-2009, 02:23 PM
Hard work, hard, hard work.

My wife works with young adults with special needs, it is a tough job that takes a little more out of you than the average teaching position.

Very much agree. My wife comes back from most of those worn out. I'm just saying if you want to get a guaranteed teaching job go for that.

smoke6
02-19-2009, 02:27 PM
That's correct. My mom is an aide in a special ed class, and I have experience in a special ed class also. I'm currently a substitute teacher, and the special ed teacher at one of the high schools is the mother of one of my best friends, so any time she needs someone she gives me a call. I LOVE those kids to death, and it's my favorite classroom to sub in. But I see what the teachers go through, and I'm just not so sure I could do it.

For instance, the classroom that I help with, they have a girl who is very prone to seizures. Any sudden movement or loud noise can throw her into one. Yet, next school year, another girl who is very violent is coming into the classroom. Now obviously there is nothing that sweet girl can do about her condition, but it's VERY dangerous to put her and the other girl in the same room together. She throws chairs, she screams, she hits people. The safety and well being of both of the children is an issue, yet they have hardly a choice but to try and make it work.

There are different types of SpEd classroom though. :thumbup:

will5979
02-19-2009, 02:30 PM
You teach a lot more in history class than just WWII and the Civil War.

Amen to that! When I chose to major in history I was only interested in one subject of history, warfare! I couldn't wait to share my vast knowledge of the world wars, the revolution, and the war between the states. However, now that I've been teaching for the majority of the decade my interest in history has also expanded to politics. You learn more even as you teach!

smoke6
02-19-2009, 02:51 PM
Amen to that! When I chose to major in history I was only interested in one subject of history, warfare! I couldn't wait to share my vast knowledge of the world wars, the revolution, and the war between the states. However, now that I've been teaching for the majority of the decade my interest in history has also expanded to politics. You learn more even as you teach!

I love the history of the "War of Northern Aggression against the Sunny States of the South"! :beerme:

will5979
02-19-2009, 03:14 PM
I love the history of the "War of Northern Aggression against the Sunny States of the South"! :beerme:

"War for Southern Independence" is a good one as well! Growing up I never thought anything of seeing a rebel flag with the sayings "The South Will Rise Again" or "Lee Surrendered, I Didn't." Now everytime I see one of those flags I laugh my butt off thinking of some redneck drinking a Bud and saluting those flags!

I shouldn't laugh too much though, cause growing up a Hank Jr. fan I have one of his rebel flag with the title of his song "If the South Would've Won We Would've Had It Made."

cincrazy
02-20-2009, 01:42 AM
Does anyone know anything about teaching abroad? If the right situation presented itself I'd consider that.

will5979
02-20-2009, 08:58 AM
Does anyone know anything about teaching abroad? If the right situation presented itself I'd consider that.

Just make sure they pay for EVERYTHING! House, travel, food, clothing, etc. Plus make sure you get triple the salary you make in the good ol' US of A.

PS It should all be tax free as well.

DTCromer
02-20-2009, 12:34 PM
Does anyone know anything about teaching abroad? If the right situation presented itself I'd consider that.

I know of a teacher's son teaching in Shanghai. She said he absolutely loves it. I've also looked into teaching abroad at times, but most of the deadlines for next school year have passed. You can pretty much teach anywhere in the world if you'd like. Just Google it and lots of sites will pop up.

Stephenk29
02-20-2009, 02:59 PM
Does anyone know anything about teaching abroad? If the right situation presented itself I'd consider that.

I know someone teaching in South Korea and he absolutely loves it. So much so he is going back for a second year.

China I know has lots of opportunities. We had a rep come talk to our edu department when I was still in college. I actually considered it for awhile. I would have to look into that a little more as I don't remember much about it.

I think it both cases the teacher just teaches English.

cincrazy
02-22-2009, 03:45 PM
Can anyone give me any info. on the state of teaching in Florida? Hard to get a job, easy, any other info. that might help.

reds1869
02-22-2009, 05:46 PM
As other posters mentioned, special ed will give you job security, but it is HARD work. Social studies is my first passion but I've never even attempted to get a job in those content areas as the market is soooo tough.

I've been teaching music for eight years and finding a job has always been fairly easy. I've had to move cities several times (Cleveland to Columbus to Cincinnati) for personal reasons. I think the reasons I've had very little trouble are 1)I have a K-12 license in a relatively underrepresented subject area, and I'm willing to teach K-8 which a lot of my fellow music teachers are not. 2) I have technology skills that the schools find useful. I've served successfully as a tech coordinator and it really pads my resume.

Sorry to ramble. I guess what I am getting at is that the more diversified your skill set, the more marketable you are. The midwest is tough, but there are jobs to be found with persistence and marketability.

Edit: The jobs grow on trees in Florida. Half of my graduating class teaches there.