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Boss-Hog
02-18-2009, 05:52 PM
Hi all,

I thought I'd post this thread here because I'm sure many others have been through the experience. My lifestyle is suitable enough to own a puppy, and I've done my homework and have come to the conclusion that a Boston Terrier is the breed I'm going to go with. I have absolutely no preference on the gender.

That being said, the next question is: from where? The two primary options I'm considering are from recommended breeders of the local breeders club and from the classifieds section. I think rescuing a dog is an extremely admirable thing to do and I know some people who have been very lucky in that regard, but admittedly, I can't get past the idea of potentially adopting a dog that's been so abused it will never be able overcome it to be "normal". Don't worry, I have no intention of looking at a pet store or anything along those lines.

As you'll probably expect, the price difference is significant between the two options. Purchasing from a recommended breeder in my area is a minimum of $900 for a male and about $1000 for a female. I've checked with other breeders and confirmed that is indeed the going rate for a puppy of this breed. On the other hand, you can find puppies of this breed available in the paper from $200 - $300. Price is not a major consideration, but if a perfectly fine puppy can be had from the classifieds, the price difference would make the decision a no brainer.

My reluctance towards buying a puppy from a listing in the classifieds is that I have the impression that I am less likely to know exactly what I'm getting vs. someone who has years and years of experience in this area. If anyone that has gone either of these routes would care to share your experiences and/or advice, I'd greatly appreciate it.

Thanks,

Boss

Chip R
02-18-2009, 06:01 PM
Oh, Boss, don't you love us anymore? ;)

Boss-Hog
02-18-2009, 06:02 PM
Oh, Boss, don't you love us anymore? ;)
Yeah, between my social life, work and here, there's not enough for me to deal with. ;)

nate
02-18-2009, 06:12 PM
There's a place here called "Happy Tails" that my wife and I just adopted from. We had been researching breeds for quite awhile and on a whim, we checked it out on their adoption day. My wife said we'd just "look" but I knew we'd come home with something.

Anyhow, we ended up with a purebred Shih Tzu who just about the most perfect dog we could've hoped for. He's 1 1/2 years old and was already trained in some basic commands. I think he might've been clicker trained because he responds well to snaps.

We had considered a purebred puppy but the wife was a bit daunted by the price, "puppy farms" and training. For a couple hundred bucks (instead of the money you mentioned) we got a certified pure breed dog who's 100% perfect for us (although 0% perfect for the cat.)

I'd recommend checking out your local adoption joints first and seeing if there's a guy there that you like.

MWM
02-18-2009, 06:24 PM
Boss, if you don't have the time, I'd strongly urge you NOT to get a puppy. I've got a very close friend who's worked in the animal rescure business for years and she was incredibly valuable as we were going through the adoption process (she actually has a Boston Terrier named Boggs after Wade). She said the #1 mistake people make is that they go after puppies without realizing what kind of committment they take. The majority of people would be much happier with an adolescent or young adult (2-4 years old).

If you're concerned about the dog's history, I'd work through a fostering organization as opposed to a shelter. That's what we did for both dogs and they've worked out beautifully. The benefit of fostering organizations is that the dogs actually live in a home with fosters who can give you a lot of detail about the dog (i.e. good with other dogs, kids, cats, etc...). They can give you an indication of the dog's energy level, temperament, whether or not it's high or low maintenance. In a lot of ways, you're going to know more than if you went to a breeder for a brand new one. And most of the time, the dog will have been with the foster long enough to get a good feel for the dog's overall personality. They'll be able to tell you if the dog was abused or if it has anything you should worry about.

Most fosters are more than happy to answer all your questions, let you visit with the dog, see if there's a fit, etc...

It's not perfect, and there's always risks with adopting dogs, but working through fostering organizations is the best approach, IMO. And you'd be doing a great thing in the process.

Boss-Hog
02-18-2009, 06:37 PM
Boss, if you don't have the time, I'd strongly urge you NOT to get a puppy. I've got a very close friend who's worked in the animal rescure business for years and she was incredibly valuable as we were going through the adoption process (she actually has a Boston Terrier named Boggs after Wade). She said the #1 mistake people make is that they go after puppies without realizing what kind of committment they take. The majority of people would be much happier with an adolescent or young adult (2-4 years old).

If you're concerned about the dog's history, I'd work through a fostering organization as opposed to a shelter. That's what we did for both dogs and they've worked out beautifully. The benefit of fostering organizations is that the dogs actually live in a home with fosters who can give you a lot of detail about the dog (i.e. good with other dogs, kids, cats, etc...). They can give you an indication of the dog's energy level, temperament, whether or not it's high or low maintenance. In a lot of ways, you're going to know more than if you went to a breeder for a brand new one. And most of the time, the dog will have been with the foster long enough to get a good feel for the dog's overall personality. They'll be able to tell you if the dog was abused or if it has anything you should worry about.

Most fosters are more than happy to answer all your questions, let you visit with the dog, see if there's a fit, etc...

It's not perfect, and there's always risks with adopting dogs, but working through fostering organizations is the best approach, IMO. And you'd be doing a great thing in the process.
You're definitely not the first to tell me that, but I've thought this through sufficiently and done enough research, so it's not a whim or anything like that. I live very close to work, so I'm able to come home most days at lunch and this is probably the point at my life during which I'll have the most free time, moving forward. Thanks for the advice so far.

WMR
02-18-2009, 06:57 PM
Are you dead set on a terrier? We got our pembroke welsh corgi Teddy Bear through the paper and he has been a simply delightful animal to own. He has papers and everything, and is just the perfect looking little corgi, and we ended up breeding him with another local dog and keeping one of the puppies: Obie Bear. :D

Don't know if you considered corgis at all, but you definitely should! :)

(Warning: Teddy Bear facsimile ... Not the REAL Teddy Bear :p: )
http://www.gotpetsonline.com/pictures-gallery/dog-pictures-breeders-puppies-rescue/pembroke-welsh-corgi-pictures-breeders-puppies-rescue/pictures/pembroke-welsh-corgi-0017.jpg

http://www.dannyross.co.uk/images/paddy2.JPG

They are THE MOST lovable and eager to please dogs that we've ever owned. Highly intelligent as well. They love to lay around and be lazy as well as go for walks and run and play. Just very agreeable all around.

(IIRC, RFS' family owns corgis as well.)

Boss-Hog
02-18-2009, 09:45 PM
Yes, I actually did consider a Corgi (I think they're pretty cool dogs), but based on the research I did, I think a Boston would be a better fit for my situation.

klw
02-18-2009, 10:10 PM
www.petfinder.com may be a good resource for you. It has links to shelters and shows you what many have available for adoption.

remdog
02-19-2009, 01:18 AM
When I got Remington he was a 'found' dog. I had seen an ad in the paperthat a family wanted to find a home for a black afi they had found on the streets since they already had three dogs. So, we went to see him and all the way over I kept telling my girlfriend, 'we're only looking'. Well, we walk in the door and he runs right up to me and then rolls over and wants me to scratch him. You can tell from my 'nom de plume' how 'only looking' turned out.

About a year later we rescued a female afi from the pound. I had to outbid a 'b&^%h' that wanted to breed her to make money but didn't really like dogs. So, we ended ended up with a $300.00 pound dog, very scared and likely abused dog that threw up in my car before we were even two blocks from the pound.

We got her home and she was shaking like a leaf. Then Rem stepped in. He literally started sheparding her around the house, took her to where they would eat, took her out in the yard, etc. Within a couple of days she seemed to be aware that we loved her and wouldn't ever hurt her. Once it got to that point 'Stevie' (cause the flowing locks looked like Stevie Nicks) just wanted to be near us or to be near Rem. They were inseperable for years.

So, my point in saying all of this is: when you start looking, be prepared to have a dog take ownership of you. It usually works that way, not the other way around. Secondly, if you think you can handle it, get two. It's a circus but you'll be glad you did.

Rem

MrCinatit
02-19-2009, 07:06 AM
My folks are literally addicted to basset hounds (well, and dogs in general). Two times, they have bought a set of brothers from a breeder - and they could not have been happier with both pairs.
There is nothing more fulfilling than watching that cute little puppy grow into the faithful adult. Yes, there are the growing pains (potty training, the barking stage, chewing everything in sight) - but it was so worth it both times. The great thing about it was having an ability to train them the way my parents wanted to train them, in their own manners (rewards work better than punishment in many cases).
From that experience, I think that you could get a goldmine of a dog through the right breeder, boss-hog. (how I long for having a dog, but I cannot see my apartment being the right environment).

klw
02-19-2009, 07:10 AM
Yes, I actually did consider a Corgi (I think they're pretty cool dogs), but based on the research I did, I think a Boston would be a better fit for my situation.

Good conclusion. Corgis sing too much!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJQM5xBaRXI&eurl=http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=63224&page=10

bucksfan2
02-19-2009, 08:50 AM
My 2 cents.

Not a big terrier fan. I like bigger dogs, labs, but my parents have a terrier mix that is full of energy. I would be a little wary of adopting a pure bread dog. In order to get the desired traits they breed fathers and daughters and mothers and sons. This leads to more prevalent genetic defects. A puppy is a challenge to raise. The potty training, early mornings, biting, chewing, etc. all come along with a puppy training. The vet also recommends not leaving the dog in a cage for longer than its age in months +1 until they get to 6 months old. They are fun and cute when they are puppies but a lot of work.

My wife and I adopted a lab/spaniel mix about a year ago. He was around 6 weeks old and for the first 5 months we had him one of us went home every day during lunch, or had a friend or parent stop by. He was difficult to potty train and loved to go outside and tear up my yard. He also needed to get up every day around 630 which was bad on the weekends. Once he it about 6 months it started to get better although he still chews on socks and window sills, and anything he can get his mouth on.

A couple of suggestions for you. When you get your dog and are able to take him around other dogs do so. Its a lot nicer when you dog is friendly around other dogs. Also make sure you introduce him to as many people as possible, especially children. Get him accustomed to all kinds of people right away.

One final suggestion is a doggie day care type thing. I was skeptical when I first heard about it but it is a godsend. I drop my dog off before work, pick him up after the gym and he is happy and tired. My spot runs around $22 and we do it once a month. Dogs love that type of activity.

cincinnati chili
02-19-2009, 10:24 AM
Even though you've done your homework, I second MWM's recommendation to get an adult (or at least not super-young) Boston. Unless the dog's trauma is severe, he/she will bond with you, plus you won't have to deal with the potty-training, the destroying your furniture, destroying your shoes, etc. Plus, unlike say a German Shepard, Boston's will continue to be cute and kind of look like puppies even when they're adults.

My family always got pure breads growing up. My wife and I adopted a 5-month old mutt (chihuahua terrier mix) who had been in and out of foster homes. He's managed to be the smartest, healthiest, and most loyal dog I've ever been around.

Also, try to find one who is crate-trained. if the dog thinks the crate is a safe place, you'll appreciate it throughout his/her life. Even though our dog is 5 yrs old now, and has free run of the house, he goes back in the crate during thunderstorms, and will willingy go in on-command, when we have guests who are afraid of dogs.

FutureRedsGM
02-19-2009, 10:52 AM
Boss, if you don't have the time, I'd strongly urge you NOT to get a puppy. I've got a very close friend who's worked in the animal rescure business for years and she was incredibly valuable as we were going through the adoption process (she actually has a Boston Terrier named Boggs after Wade). She said the #1 mistake people make is that they go after puppies without realizing what kind of committment they take. The majority of people would be much happier with an adolescent or young adult (2-4 years old).


It's not perfect, and there's always risks with adopting dogs, but working through fostering organizations is the best approach, IMO. And you'd be doing a great thing in the process.

Agree 100%. I was at Feeders Supply last night getting food for my Jack Russel (best dog ever) and, like always, I checked out the selection of dogs available from the Humane Society while there. They had a 2 year old black lab who was already house trained, already had all shots, was microchiped and nuetered. The adoption fee was $105. Not only are you doing a good deed by adopting, but you are also getting an animal that is already trained and is unlikely to tear up your house by soiling the carpets or chewing up the walls. And the cost of adoption is less than what you would pay by having these services performed on a new puppy. If/when I get another dog, I will definitely go the adoption route.

Puffy
02-19-2009, 11:19 AM
Boss,

There is not a right way to do this, there is a right way for you. First, adopting from the classifieds is fine (its how I found my lab) but the key is to visit the dogs and find one that has the personality you are searching for. The number one problem is people get enamored by a cute puppy and don't follow the clues the puppies are giving you. For instance, the puppy I adopted was located in Orlando (where my parents live) I asked my Dad to check it out first since he was there and he knew the type of dog I was looking for. When he got there the puppy came right up to him and started licking him and following him, etc. So we knew the puppy had what I wanted - excellent social skills. The dog wasn't pushy or dominant, etc.

So, my advice is check out all your options - but know what character traits you are looking for right off the bat and don't deviate because you got sucked in by cuteness. If puppy is aloof and dominant, you should probably avoid unless you want to put in extra time for obedience trainings. Have a plan of what you are looking for and stick to it.

GIK
02-19-2009, 01:06 PM
My wife and I went the breeder route, mainly because we knew exactly what we wanted (breed, color, sex and age). BTW, he's a chocolate labrador retriever. In addition, certain breeds are susceptible to particular health problems and one way to help limit this is to know the dog's family history (which is a bit hard to do from a shelter). Either way, dogs are great and a wonderful addition to the family.

Boss-Hog
02-19-2009, 05:22 PM
Thanks again for the good advice, everyone.

MrCinatit
02-19-2009, 06:06 PM
Boss,

There is not a right way to do this, there is a right way for you.

You are right. Though my parents have bought four through breeders, we've also had two given to us and have adopted four strays that people dropped off at the side of the road (we live in the country). Mom said she would like to adopt a female mutt when our oldest passes away to counteract the two male bassets.

cincinnati chili
02-20-2009, 01:52 AM
Boss,

There is not a right way to do this

But of course there is. The WRONG way would be to steal five puppies out of the arms of small children, take them all home, pick the one you like best, and then drown the other four in the river.

The OPPOSITE of this way, is the RIGHT way.

But seriously, please report on how this goes, and provide pictures.

Sea Ray
02-20-2009, 09:22 AM
When I got Remington he was a 'found' dog. I had seen an ad in the paperthat a family wanted to find a home for a black afi they had found on the streets since they already had three dogs. So, we went to see him and all the way over I kept telling my girlfriend, 'we're only looking'. Well, we walk in the door and he runs right up to me and then rolls over and wants me to scratch him. You can tell from my 'nom de plume' how 'only looking' turned out.

About a year later we rescued a female afi from the pound. I had to outbid a 'b&^%h' that wanted to breed her to make money but didn't really like dogs. So, we ended ended up with a $300.00 pound dog, very scared and likely abused dog that threw up in my car before we were even two blocks from the pound.

We got her home and she was shaking like a leaf. Then Rem stepped in. He literally started sheparding her around the house, took her to where they would eat, took her out in the yard, etc. Within a couple of days she seemed to be aware that we loved her and wouldn't ever hurt her. Once it got to that point 'Stevie' (cause the flowing locks looked like Stevie Nicks) just wanted to be near us or to be near Rem. They were inseperable for years.

So, my point in saying all of this is: when you start looking, be prepared to have a dog take ownership of you. It usually works that way, not the other way around. Secondly, if you think you can handle it, get two. It's a circus but you'll be glad you did.

Rem

Great story Rem!

I don't have the time it takes to care for a dog but I love playing with other people's dogs.

My experience has been with cats and boy are those breeders a "different breed" themselves. I haven't found one yet that I get along with. Strange people.

It basically goes like this. Yes, I'd like to buy one of your nicely bred kittens.

Answer: OK, but you can't have him until he's 12 weeks old. He needs all that time with his mother. And you can't breed him, let him outside or declaw him. I have the right to check on these things in the coming years and if I think you've broken these promises I have the right to take the cat back from you.Here sign this 6 page contract which includes all of these obligations on your part.

My reply: Look Pal, if I spend $600 for that cat, he's mine. If I declaw him so he won't ruin my furnture doing what comes naturally to him so be it. If I want to re-coup my money and breed him that's my right. It's just a cat and this is what you can do with your 6 page contract...

flyer85
02-20-2009, 12:46 PM
See if there are any local rescue facilities for the breed you are interested in. We have a dog purchased from a breeder and another acquired from a rescue. IMO a rescue is the way to go.

Redlegs23
02-20-2009, 01:07 PM
I strongly suggest you check out www.petfinder.com. That's where my wife and I went to get ours. You can select the breed, age, etc, and search for them. These are dogs that are badly in need of a home. Petfinder is a collection of rescue agencies that takes dogs from the pound to try and place them in homes so that they don't get euthanized. The more dogs they place in homes the more they can save from the pound. We ended up getting a 7 week old lab mix (we're not really sure what she is), but she has been an awesome addition to the family. Best dog I've ever had (including the pure bred Golden Retrievers I had growing up, which also loved). She potty trained in about 4 days, learns tricks with about 5 minutes of teaching, and is extremely loyal. We paid $150 for her and that included the first few rounds of shots as well as the cost to get her fixed. So basically she was free.

WebScorpion
02-25-2009, 02:37 PM
It sounds like you know what you're doing and have pretty much set your mind on the breed you'd like, so I won't argue for any of my favorites. As far as getting a dog with problems from a rescue, I'm not sure I'd worry too much about that. Dogs mostly live in the moment...dogs that have been severely mistreated by others can be perfectly fine with a stable owner. Dogs are pack animals and so will be happier with two or more...as long as you establish yourself (and you're stable) as the pack leader. Anyway, I hope you get a dog that makes you as happy as some of mine have...they're just a fantastic source of companionship, love, entertainment, and support. I've had dogs that respond to sound, sight, and of course smell and have trained them with balls, treats, clickers, voice commands, and hand signals. They're so smart and eager to please, you just have to find their particular driving force. Anyway, the Petfinder link provided earlier is a great resource. There is a Midwest Boston Terrier Rescue (http://www.midwestbtrescue.org/)and they seem to have some dogs in Ohio (http://www.midwestbtrescue.org/adopt.OH/index.htm)looking for homes. I'd recommend at least looking at them before paying a ton of money for a breeder pup. Whichever way you go, I wish you the best of luck and many wonderful memories!
http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-fc/dog.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org)

Road Pop
02-28-2009, 06:12 PM
I found my dog through classifieds. Papers/pedigree/bloodlines were all excellent. Somewhat cheaper than larger breeders, but it was all about companionship, not showing and/or breeding. Price had no reflection. The family was very nice and I checked references to make sure.

I got him at 8-9 weeks old and cage/potty trained him. Left him in the cage while at work and went home during breaks. I also had some help from friends LOL. After he was housebroke, he has the run of the house and is VERY well behaved. This was my second dog to raise this way.

Lots of good advice here. But I would rather watch my puppy grow into a young dog. I'd hate to miss out on the formative years.

Anyway, check references and you can find a great dog. Good luck and have patience training LOL. Post pics when you get your new friend.

Butch -

http://i395.photobucket.com/albums/pp39/hamertek98/Butchwallpaper-1.jpg

smith288
02-28-2009, 07:12 PM
I would recommend against a dog. They take away your ability to go anywhere on a whim if you are single or have a girl. They are VERY hard work in order to train them and they can/will rip apart important things in their puppy hood.

I would wait. This coming from experience with my, now, 10 yr old doberman.

remdog
02-28-2009, 11:22 PM
I would recommend against a dog. They take away your ability to go anywhere on a whim if you are single or have a girl. They are VERY hard work in order to train them and they can/will rip apart important things in their puppy hood.

I would wait. This coming from experience with my, now, 10 yr old doberman.

Personally, I never had any problem traveling and I was in the Duty Free business when I had Rem and Stevie and was going to Asia and Europe.

Dog sitters/caretakers are available and that's what I used if I had to go on a long trip so that they could stay somewhere that they were familiar with and weren't confined. Dog doors made it easy and, frankly, afghans, while they can be clowns at times, are actually big couch potatoes. A comfy bed, food every day and a way to relieve themselves and they're usually a piece of cake.

Or, if you want to leave town for a few days, find a good boarding kennel. This often works well if the kennel has 'play time' where they let the dogs interact with other dogs.

Take the dog with you. Marriott has over 3000 hotels around the world and I'd say 1/3 to 1/2 of them in the US will accept a dog that is 35 lbs. or under. Should be no problem with a Boston Terrier. You might have to put down a little bigger bigger depost or a special cleaning fee but dogs like a little road trip too.

Starwood (Sheraton/Westin) has made catering to dogs an art form. At many of their hotels they provide a special dogie bed and even have a dog menu for room service (Iams, Purinia, etc.). Just don't order him the sirloin burger 'cause he'll never want regular canned stuff again. ;)

And as to the point of having a girlfriend---if you don't have one now get a dog and you'll add the lady soon. Women love dogs and especially a guy that's a 'single parent' of that dog. It shows his sensitivity and apptitude to become a great father. :)

Rem

Eric_the_Red
02-28-2009, 11:34 PM
Whether you decide on a breeder or newspaper listing, the key is to ask the right questions.

- Are the parents on premises? (The dog's, not the breeders. That'd be weird.)

- Is there a spay/neuter contract, and a show contract? (There should be.)

- What inoculations has the puppy had? (Owner should have documentation.)

- Any references of past buyers?

- Can your vet examine the puppy before purchase?

- What guarantees are provided?

Good luck! I love Boston Terriers myself. We may go that route for our next dog (we have a pug now).

Spitball
03-03-2009, 07:45 PM
Yes, I actually did consider a Corgi (I think they're pretty cool dogs), but based on the research I did, I think a Boston would be a better fit for my situation.

I'm with WilyMo on the Pemboke Welsh Corgi recommendation. Our daughter's Corgi, Honey, is a genius and a great companion. She is really entertaining. She hates the vacuum cleaner, hair drier, and the crock pot. If you even say one of those words, she barks at you. Also, she hates gay cows. You can moo like a normal cow, and she hardly notices. But, if you say, "Moo-oo," like a gay cow, she barks, snarls, and grabs your shirt.

As long as you don't also have a gay cow, I highly recommend the corgi.

RFS62
03-03-2009, 08:14 PM
Boss, just so you'll know, Corgi's are chick magnets.

Just sayin'.

:pimp:

remdog
03-03-2009, 09:36 PM
Boss, just so you'll know, Corgi's are chick magnets.

Just sayin'.

:pimp:

That's true. And they also make you look taller. :p:

So, the bigger question is: has any dog adopted you yet?

Rem

Spitball
03-04-2009, 11:07 PM
Boss, just so you'll know, Corgi's are chick magnets.

Just sayin'.

:pimp:

I've heard it said, "Corgi butts drive chicks nuts!" :D

jmcclain19
03-18-2009, 01:40 AM
Boss I guessed I missed this thread earlier.

My wife is a dog groomer, so I get to see all types all year round. In fact we just went to the Arizona Dog Show two Sundays ago.

I love Boston Terriers. Awesome awesome dogs. They are little clowns with amazingly expressive personalities.

It was the dog we were going to get next - and then one of my wife's friends who runs a Chihuahua rescue convinced her to take an abused Chihuahua and we haven't yet decided to take on the 3rd dog yet with two dogs and a 1 year old.

Bostons are very similiar to French Bulldogs, with Frenchies being a little shorter and heavier. But Bostons don't have near the amount of health issues French Bulldogs do.

Be aware they do have some serious energy, but that can be taken care of with regular daily walks and good training. I'll echo about not getting a puppy - they are cute and fun and high maintenance and destructive and need 24-7 supervision. Unless you plan on keeping them in a bathroom or a closet or a kennel during the day when you can't be home (not fun options all around) you're setting up a potential tornado.

I would try a local Boston Terrier rescue first. There are huge benefits of doing so.

#1 - Rescue dogs in my experience have had a pretty rough life. You giving them a second chance with a nice home usually means a pal for life.

#2 - Rescue typically have been in a foster home for a period of time before they get adopted, meaning you'll get accurate information about that dogs quirks, habits and behaviors. Do they get along with cats, other dogs, kids, birds, etc? Are they housebroken? How healthy are they? Folks in the classifieds are complete mystery, some may want to help you, but most are likely just looking to sell the puppies. Rescuing Dogs costs a huge amount in time, energy, personal investment and out of pocket cash - those folks do it for the love of dogs and the love of the particular breed. And most have a form of a return policy if the dog just doesn't work out.

Most breed specific rescues specialize in one breed, but also have lots of cross breeds as well, you'll likely see some Boston/Pugs or the like in Boston Terrier rescue groups as well. One of those may be your future pet.

Anyway, that's my two cents - good luck and report back when you have a new pooch.

Boss-Hog
03-18-2009, 08:41 AM
All,

Just to give you an update - I've met with some local breeders twice now and things have gone well. They have three puppies that are nine and a half weeks old and will likely give away the two males (assuming they find people they feel would make responsible owners). Things have gone well, but coming in, their primary concern is placing one with an owner who lives in an apartment (at least for now). As a result, on Monday, they brought the puppies over to take a look at my living situation and the major concern that was raised was that I have a bunch of electronic components and wires on (or near) the ground (i.e. for my TV, DVD Player, Wii and A/V receiver). They made it clear that puppies will chew anything if given the chance, including this stuff, and cautioned that they hoped my couches weren't too expensive because they will be chewed up. :) Admittedly, the electronic equipment is a hazard I did not consider and I don't see an easy solution because the stuff is located in my living room, which is the biggest part of the apartment, so it's not really practical to simply restrict the puppy from accessing that entire area.

They're been extremely complimentary of my character and feel comfortable that I would make a responsible owner, so that's not an issue. They know that I live only five minutes from work, so I am able to come home at lunch to walk and feed the puppy. I'm waiting to hear back from them, so I'm not sure if they're going to allow me to adopt one of theirs, but regardless, this problem is something I need to consider with any dog. If anyone has encountered a similar situation or has any recommendations on how to address it, I'm all ears. Thanks again for the good advice.

JaxRed
03-18-2009, 08:55 AM
Again, I echo the "adult dog from rescue" route. I wanted a beagle, and the rescue lady steered me away from the dog I initially asked about because she was very active and both me and the wife are away from home working 10 hours a day.

She suggested a different beagle which was VERY laid back and mellow and loved being inside. And she made a great choice for us.

By getting an adult you avoid the puppy issues like chewing.

But the nice part is there is no wrong answer. Either way you'll end up with a great companion.

remdog
03-18-2009, 09:22 AM
Boss:

Is there anyway to raise the wireing above a reachable height? Even if it isn't the most attractive solution, if you don't care about that, you would probably only have to have it that way until the 'chewing' stage has passed. And, if you live in an apartment, there's always the opportunity to move elsewhere if you'd like to.

Again, I agree with others here that would rescue an older dog and not have to go through the puppy stage.

Rem

Boss-Hog
03-18-2009, 10:10 AM
You guys (and gals) are right - I am now open to considering an older dog, but I do not want one more than two years old at the most. Ideally, he or she would be between one and two years old - I don't want to get a dog that's already several years into his or her life, but adopting at this age would eliminate puppy issues, such as house-training. In adopting a young dog (that is not a puppy), is the issue I mentioned above something I will still have to worry about or do most dogs outgrow the "chewing anything" phase by that age? Thanks again.

Boss-Hog
03-18-2009, 10:13 AM
Boss:

Is there anyway to raise the wireing above a reachable height? Even if it isn't the most attractive solution, if you don't care about that, you would probably only have to have it that way until the 'chewing' stage has passed. And, if you live in an apartment, there's always the opportunity to move elsewhere if you'd like to.

Again, I agree with others here that would rescue an older dog and not have to go through the puppy stage.

Rem
Thanks for the suggestion(s)...all my electronic stuff sits on an entertainment center, which has shelves below the TV, so short of getting furniture that moves everything out of reach, it's not currently a feasible option.

JaxRed
03-18-2009, 10:14 AM
I'd say by 2 you have that stage gone.

bucksfan2
03-18-2009, 10:23 AM
Boss, when the wife and I were looking at dogs most a lot of people recommended getting an adult dog. We went ahead and got a 6 week old puppy. To be honest an adult dog may have been easier but I wouldn't pass up raising a puppy. They can be difficult and challenging but well worth it. Even the tough times you can look back and laugh at. Our lab is now about 14 months old and has chewed up two computer cords and about 5 window sills. He hasn't chewed up any or our couches.

I have also noticed that breeders or adopters can be a little particular. I realize that they want to place their dogs in the best situation possible but once the dog is gone it is gone. No matter the situation they will revert to begin a dog.

redsfanmia
03-18-2009, 11:21 AM
Boss, when the wife and I were looking at dogs most a lot of people recommended getting an adult dog. We went ahead and got a 6 week old puppy. To be honest an adult dog may have been easier but I wouldn't pass up raising a puppy. They can be difficult and challenging but well worth it. Even the tough times you can look back and laugh at. Our lab is now about 14 months old and has chewed up two computer cords and about 5 window sills. He hasn't chewed up any or our couches.

I have also noticed that breeders or adopters can be a little particular. I realize that they want to place their dogs in the best situation possible but once the dog is gone it is gone. No matter the situation they will revert to begin a dog.

Our akita puppy chewed the posts on our bed, the knobs off the the dresser, the carpet and window sills. She ripped many sheets and comforters digging at them. I would not have traded the puppy stage for anything even with all of these things. I got to see my dog develop into who she is now, a great dog who I love.

remdog
03-19-2009, 01:25 PM
Boss:

Most pups out grow the teething stage at between 1 & 1/2 and 2. So, your age range is right on.

I got Rem when he was about 2; Stevie was about 1 & 1/2. Neither were a problem with chewing, they were house-trained and didn't get worried about being left alone during the work day (as long as they had a way out to relieve themselves).

Check around. Boston Terriers are pretty mellow dogs anyway so if that's what you are looking for then you've probably got a lot of good possibilities out there.

Rem

WebScorpion
03-20-2009, 03:33 PM
Our dogs were crate trained, (when they're not with someone, they're in their 'den') so they never chewed anything and had very few accidents in the house. Puppies require a lot of exercise, (so do healthy older dogs,) so the more outdoor walking and playing they get, the less likely they are to get into trouble in the house. Later in life, they still go to their 'crate' on command, but their crate is now just a dog bed. :D If you come home for lunch every day (and have someone else do it when you can't) they are supposed to be ok for 4 hours or so in the crate. My wife and I have irregular hours, so we never really had to leave them in the crate that long.

Spitball
03-24-2009, 09:01 AM
Speaking of puppies, has anyone seen this video?

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/689202/puppy_and_duck/

Boss-Hog
05-10-2009, 12:57 PM
Here's my new puppy ("Johnny" - not after Cueto, but I don't mind with the way he's pitching :)). He turned four months old yesterday and he's an awesome puppy.

cincinnati chili
05-10-2009, 01:51 PM
Boss, He's handsome. I'm talking Don Zimmer handsome. Nice work and good luck with the training.

MrCinatit
05-10-2009, 01:55 PM
Awesome, Boss - though he has that "I'm up to no good" look on his face.

remdog
05-10-2009, 06:32 PM
About time! :lol:

Good looking dog. Although he just looks like (in that picture) that he might be a handfull in the puppy stages. Most dogs are like that. :thumbup:

Good luck with him. Once you bond, he'll be your best friend for life.

Rem

TheNext44
05-11-2009, 01:55 AM
Congratulations!!!

I am not using hyperbole when I say that your life will never be the same, and only in a good way.

Dogs are awesome!! The best part is that no matter how crappy a day you had, he will always be there for you, unconditionally.

Well, that and the fact that they are chick magnets. Take him to a restaurant with outdoor seating, and you will see for yourself! You won't have time to eat, you'll have so many babes falling all over him.

Enjoy!

Brutus_the_Red
05-14-2009, 04:38 AM
Late to the thread.

Congrats on the BT, Boss. If you're ever up in Dayton, he can hang out with my BT, Lemmy.

Boss-Hog
05-14-2009, 11:14 AM
Late to the thread.

Congrats on the BT, Boss. If you're ever up in Dayton, he can hang out with my BT, Lemmy.
Sounds good - you have a nice looking Boston. :)