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OldRightHander
02-27-2009, 04:50 PM
Would you ever go to the effort of responding to a job listing, sending a resume, and scheduling an interview, and then not bother showing up to the interview?

That has happened twice recently. I placed an ad for a sales position and started getting resumes pretty quickly after I placed the ad. I contacted the people who sent resumes and weeded out some of them over the phone, some of the people who didn't read the ad carefully and when they found out what kind of position it is weren't that interested, but I had a couple other people who seemed genuinely interested and we scheduled interviews. Neither one of them bothered to show up. Neither one of them bothered to call me or even return my calls.

I understand that it's a numbers game and that I'll probably have to weed through quite a few people, but I still don't understand why someone would bother to schedule an interview and blow it off. If you're not that interested, why even bother scheduling the interview? Why not just tell me over the phone that it's not what you're looking for. That's twice now that I have set aside a block of time and stayed in town to meet with someone who didn't bother showing up.

Is it just my dumb luck that I've gotten two of those in a row, or is it something I'm doing when I contact these people? I have no experience recruiting and interviewing, so I'm really flying by the seat of my pants here. Is this a common thing, people not bothering to even show up for interviews?

nineworldseries
03-02-2009, 08:07 PM
Perhaps they got another job in the period between the phone call and the interview?

I'm guessing people apply for tons of jobs at once (it's a numbers game as you say), and perhaps they got a better seeming offer and then just decided to blow off the other jobs.

Reds4Life
03-02-2009, 10:45 PM
I wouldn't, but I've had to hire some people before and nobody would believe all the crap that goes on.

If you are the person being interviewed, let me tell you, if you show up on time and dress professionally, you are ahead of about 50% of the other applicants. I was interviewing for a white collar office job and I had someone show up in jeans and a hat.

forfreelin04
03-03-2009, 01:28 AM
I wouldn't, but I've had to hire some people before and nobody would believe all the crap that goes on.

If you are the person being interviewed, let me tell you, if you show up on time and dress professionally, you are ahead of about 50% of the other applicants. I was interviewing for a white collar office job and I had someone show up in jeans and a hat.

Did he also have a wifebeater (chesthair poppin) and a gold chain? :)

Roy Tucker
03-03-2009, 08:53 AM
I can't imagine just not showing up for an interview is a common thing. I'd think its professional courtesy to do so and professional suicide not to. I'd chalk it up to bad luck, ORH.

I've long learned that in the professional world, you never know who from your past you may be working with (or for) and it goes a long way for that person to have a good memory of you, i.e. never burn your bridges.

When I hired into the job I have now, I had two other jobs on the front burner. I mailed them a letter informing them of my intentions and followed it up with a thank-you phone call. We parted on good terms and they said call immediately if the new job doesn't work out.

15fan
03-03-2009, 10:41 AM
Before the holidays, I had a vacancy to fill. Set up phone interviews as a first round. Confirmed the dates, times, and phone numbers that I would call with each of the candidates. I also left each of them with my contact info should something have arisen prior to the interview.

When I called one of the candidates, I got her voice mail on her cell phone. Left her a message. Tried calling back about 10 minutes later and got her voice mail again. I never heard back from her.

She didn't get the job.

goreds2
03-03-2009, 09:30 PM
Hearing these stories, you would think the economy is great. :confused:

camisadelgolf
03-03-2009, 10:01 PM
My dream job is wearing jeans and a t-shirt every day. Beyond that, I don't care if I'm shoveling manure or selling bibles to members of the Taliban. ORH, I'll sell anything you want and do a good job of it if as long as the dress code is casual. I'm punctual, hard-working and can convince people of the most ridiculous things you've ever heard of (i.e. my diabetes is contagious, I don't drink water due to allergies, and I was linked by DNA to the caveman who invented fire).

deltachi8
03-03-2009, 10:22 PM
As a former HR Director, it would be more shocking to hear that everyone you scheduled showed up for the interview.

What gets even more interesting is when the person does not show up and then applies again later on or calls when the job they took tanks and wants to know if they can now reschedule. Those are fun calls.

Unassisted
03-04-2009, 01:13 PM
I've seen plenty of discourtesy from the other side of the interview. In about 80% of my recent interview experiences, the employer never bothered to contact me after the interview. Apparently in these days where applications can only be submitted online, HR departments are content to let the "application status" indicator on the web site suffice as the only notification.

I can understand not contacting someone you're not inviting for an interview, but it's downright irritating to not notify a candidate of the outcome whom you've taken the time to interview.

I had another employer that made a big deal about reimbursing me for my expenses, since it was a 50-mile drive to their office. It came up about 3x during the interview, to the point where the last step was verifying my mailing address so they could send the check. Of course, no check ever came and this was also one of the places that lets its web site do its notifying. :thumbdown

Reds4Life
03-04-2009, 01:40 PM
I've seen plenty of discourtesy from the other side of the interview. In about 80% of my recent interview experiences, the employer never bothered to contact me after the interview. Apparently in these days where applications can only be submitted online, HR departments are content to let the "application status" indicator on the web site suffice as the only notification.

I can understand not contacting someone you're not inviting for an interview, but it's downright irritating to not notify a candidate of the outcome whom you've taken the time to interview.

I had another employer that made a big deal about reimbursing me for my expenses, since it was a 50-mile drive to their office. It came up about 3x during the interview, to the point where the last step was verifying my mailing address so they could send the check. Of course, no check ever came and this was also one of the places that lets its web site do its notifying. :thumbdown

Same, many HR departments are very unprofessional these days, and some flat out lie to your face.

I was on my 3rd interview with one company (all 3 had been by phone), about a week after the 3rd interview I got the reject email. No explaination, no nothing, but they did see fit to waste about 3 hours of time time during the process.

OldRightHander
03-05-2009, 12:15 AM
I can't speak for my HR department, since I am a sole proprietor and wear all the hats anyway, and maybe it's because I have always been on the other side of the hiring process, but I just can't see being that discourteous to someone who actually bothered to show up for an interview. I've done one interview and that person was obviously not going to cut it, but I had the courtesy to let him know over the phone instead of through an email or some other non personal manner.

It just baffles me that we're supposedly in a time when people really need work and I'm offering work, albeit commission, and people think they can just blow off interviews without even a call or anything. They'd better not think of calling to reschedule at this point either.

Caseyfan21
03-05-2009, 11:01 AM
I would imagine people skipping out and not communicating is a pretty common thing. I am going to be graduating in June from college and I recently did the whole job search thing. They have a great career services office for the entire college of engineering here at OSU. Lots of jobs posted and lots of on campus job fairs and interviews. Anyways, they have a strict policy that you cannot skip interviews and you must provide several days notice if you have to cancel (to avoid having your account penalized). I remember a few years ago I had already accepted an internship, but had another interview still scheduled so I had to go anyways and tell the company I was just avoiding getting in trouble. But I would imagine the strict rules are in places because they had a problem with people skipping out before.

And I just don't get the burning bridges thing at all. Maybe it's because my parents raised me with a good concious, but I got the Terrell Pryor syndrom during this past round of interviews. I had 3 job offers and since I had relationships from several interviews with companies, I found it hard to tell them no. I did call all of my contacts and thank them for the opportunity and all of them told me to call them right away if my accepted offer didn't work out. They all seemed rather shocked that I took the time to call them personally but I felt like I owed them a personal call to their cell phone since they had taken the time to welcome me into their company. I've found a lot of courteousy can go a long way in the professional market.

Razor Shines
03-05-2009, 01:27 PM
This isn't really about an interview, but it's kind of funny. My wife needs to hire a new person for her store and she was going through some applications. In the box labeled "position desired" one girl wrote "stalker".

RichRed
03-05-2009, 02:11 PM
I think Raisor can offer some helpful interview tips, mostly pants-related.