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OldRightHander
03-20-2009, 02:24 PM
What are things people say that rub you the wrong way when you hear them? It could be wrong grammar or a saying that you're sick of hearing, etc.

1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"

2. Any saying that becomes trendy, no matter where it came from. If it's something from a popular tv show or wherever it came from, the minute it becomes the in thing to say that's when I not only won't say it but I get irritated when I hear other people saying it. A lot of things that became popular because Seinfeld come to mind.

3. All kind of things sports announcers say. "He would not be denied!" "I don't know how they scored all those runs when they haven't had any hits with runners in scoring position."

Rojo
03-20-2009, 02:30 PM
The word "robust" needs to be go back into hiding.

RichRed
03-20-2009, 02:31 PM
"It is what it is."

elfmanvt07
03-20-2009, 02:35 PM
"Put your pants back on."

camisadelgolf
03-20-2009, 02:40 PM
The one that drives me up the wall is when people incorrectly use 'literally'.

Also, many people overuse 'definitely'. When that happens, 'definitely' becomes 'probably'; 'probably' becomes 'maybe'; 'maybe' becomes 'probably not'; 'probably not' becomes 'almost definitely not'; and so on.

One thing I'm noticing recently is that people are misusing the word 'racism'. I think it ultimately ends in more people being offended by things that don't need to be considered offensive.

I hate it when people intentionally mess up a word to be humorous (i.e. strategerie) because idiots hear it and think they're correct in using it non-humorous situations.

I can go on . . .

Unassisted
03-20-2009, 02:44 PM
"It is what it is."
Beat me to it. Allow me to second the nomination.


1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"
Mrs. U instantly hates anyone who uses "impact" as a verb.

RichRed
03-20-2009, 02:53 PM
"Grow" used as a transitive verb. "Grow the economy." "We need to grow our business."

redsbuckeye
03-20-2009, 03:21 PM
"I don't disagree"

So what, you agree? Just say what you mean already. Those are weasel words.

Dom Heffner
03-20-2009, 03:22 PM
When people call performances genius or brilliant.

Please.

Though it's been mentioned, people need to take out the filler adverbs like actually, and literally from everyday language.

Drives me nuts.

LoganBuck
03-20-2009, 03:22 PM
Fashizzle

Tom Servo
03-20-2009, 03:46 PM
"Sir, you're making a scene."

redsfandan
03-20-2009, 04:07 PM
When people call performances genius or brilliant.

Please.
.
ding ding ding! Imo, people tend to make things out to be better or worse than what it really is whatever 'it' is. Stop the hype already. Most of the time it's not THAT good or bad.

Johnny Footstool
03-20-2009, 04:25 PM
"Grow" used as a transitive verb. "Grow the economy." "We need to grow our business."

ARRRRGH!!! I thought I was the only one who hated this!

Chip R
03-20-2009, 04:40 PM
"You're under arrest."

smith288
03-20-2009, 05:05 PM
"I Sooo agree"

Mario-Rijo
03-20-2009, 05:14 PM
"I Sooo agree"

Oh yes, I sooo agree. LOL

But seriously (how about that one?), the one that gets me is "I heard that", of course it never bothered me until Carlin brought it up. Fortunately it's not used much if at all anymore. Here'a new one that's rubbing me raw though, "What it do"? (meaning) What's going on with you"?

SunDeck
03-20-2009, 05:15 PM
"Going forward." This seems to be a phrase that business students are being taught to say a lot now.

Johnny Footstool
03-20-2009, 05:41 PM
"What if I told you..."

Usually spoken by someone who is attempting to sell you something that is too good to be true.

Dom Heffner
03-20-2009, 06:00 PM
Talk of "spring coconuts" is sort of cooly irritating. That thread is like a train wreck.

Don't want it to happen, but if it does, I'm so there.

Roy Tucker
03-20-2009, 06:10 PM
"License and registration please".

"Hello, this is the Mason police".

"There is a problem with your card, sir"

"Your call is important to us, please hold"

"Hey, that's my wife".

camisadelgolf
03-20-2009, 06:30 PM
Here's one I actually got on Wednesday night: "I thought you knew [I'm not on birth control]."
:thumbdown

redsfandan
03-20-2009, 06:38 PM
Here's one I actually got on Wednesday night: "I thought you knew [I'm not on birth control]."
:thumbdown
Ouch! Condoms stink but they're one of the necessary evils of life. Imo, it's better to play it safe everytime especially since sometimes it can be hard to know someone enough to take the chance.

sonny
03-20-2009, 08:17 PM
"So didn't I"

"For all intensive purposes"

"No Worries"

"Aight"

"Here's yer sign"

"Tell them about the discount, Harry"

"I'll Facebook you"

I could go on for hours.

vaticanplum
03-20-2009, 09:25 PM
The increasingly common misuse of "myself". Drives me up the freaking wall. I am pretty forgiving of grammar miscues when they happen out of ignorance, but a grammatical error made in effort to sound smarter is unforgivable.

RosieRed
03-20-2009, 10:05 PM
Anything having to do with Twitter.

"Tweet"
"Tweeted"
"Twote"

etc.

redsfandan
03-20-2009, 11:41 PM
Call me crazy if you want but whenever I hear "twitter" I think of some cartoon I watched when I was a kid. Twitter, tweety, eh whatever. It's just an odd name.

Yachtzee
03-20-2009, 11:46 PM
"I want to take it to the box" (meaning "I want a jury trial") - usually spoken by a defendant with a really bad case and a long record.

"The cops must've planted it there" - from defendants with a long history of drug abuse when charged with possession.

"I can't/won't come down to court, but can I send my minister/mom/dad/grandma?" - from witnesses crucial for a client's defense.

"Can I just write the judge a letter?" - again from key witnesses.

"I spoke to [the victim] and she said she want's to drop the charges." - from clients charged with domestic violence (and subject to a protection order), which means additional charges are coming.

durl
03-20-2009, 11:50 PM
- "...you know..." when used a 46 times in a sentence.

- "mean-spirited."

- In a song, "carry on." As in "how can I carry on..." or "strength to carry on..." I will point out that "Carry On Wayward Son" by Kansas is exempt from this.

Dom Heffner
03-20-2009, 11:52 PM
Here's one I actually got on Wednesday night: "I thought you knew [I'm not on birth control]."

Bad dream, huh? ;)

reds1869
03-20-2009, 11:59 PM
The increasingly common misuse of "myself". Drives me up the freaking wall. I am pretty forgiving of grammar miscues when they happen out of ignorance, but a grammatical error made in effort to sound smarter is unforgivable.

I myself love discourse markers.

Sorry, had to do it. :)

RFS62
03-21-2009, 01:05 AM
"It is what it is."


Drives me crazy. Always has.

vaticanplum
03-21-2009, 01:41 AM
I myself love discourse markers.

Sorry, had to do it. :)

But there is nothing wrong with what you just said. If you were like 85% of America and said, "Myself and a lot of others love discourse markers", then you would be proving my point.

cincinnati chili
03-21-2009, 01:51 AM
What are things people say that rub you the wrong way when you hear them? It could be wrong grammar or a saying that you're sick of hearing, etc.

1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"

2. Any saying that becomes trendy, no matter where it came from. If it's something from a popular tv show or wherever it came from, the minute it becomes the in thing to say that's when I not only won't say it but I get irritated when I hear other people saying it. A lot of things that became popular because Seinfeld come to mind.

3. All kind of things sports announcers say. "He would not be denied!" "I don't know how they scored all those runs when they haven't had any hits with runners in scoring position."

I actually LOVE IT when people use nouns as verbs. Let me rephrase. I love it when people "verb" nouns in creative fashion.

Any of you realize that "tampon" can be used as a verb? It can. You can look it up.

LawFive
03-21-2009, 01:54 AM
Please?

Danny Serafini
03-21-2009, 02:33 AM
Anything having to do with Twitter.

"Tweet"
"Tweeted"
"Twote"

etc.

Amen. I despise Twitter. The entire concept is lame. I have no idea why it's taking off.

A few others:

"The exception that proves the rule". This is just dumb. Exceptions do not prove rules, they disprove them. This phrase is complete nonsense.

Often uttered by sportscasters late in a season: "They're no longer rookies/freshmen at his point in the season". Yes, they are. They've never been through a pennant race, or a playoff game, or a postseason tournament. Everything is still brand new at this point, and they're just as prone to a rookie mistake.

A good chunk of my job is spent cleaning up resumes, and I'm seeing this trend where people are using the phrase "to include" instead of the word "including". Not only is it grammatically incorrect, it's just clunky. I don't know who's teaching this, but they need to stop now.

GAC
03-21-2009, 03:48 AM
Over use of the term "dude". It's like the whole world is turning into Keanu Reeves.

cincyinco
03-21-2009, 04:15 AM
Wow. Just wow.

*BaseClogger*
03-21-2009, 04:39 AM
"step up to the plate"

and any and all cliches...

thatcoolguy_22
03-21-2009, 05:22 AM
"And leading off Wily Taveras" :D

reds1869
03-21-2009, 06:49 AM
"And leading off Wily Taveras" :D

Oh the horror! :eek:

camisadelgolf
03-21-2009, 09:28 AM
Bad dream, huh? ;)
She looked like a dream girl as I was drinking . . .

thatcoolguy_22
03-21-2009, 10:06 AM
1 - At the end of the day
2 - Fairly unique
3 - I personally
4 - At this moment in time
5 - With all due respect
6 - Absolutely
7 - It's a nightmare
8 - Shouldn't of
9 - 24/7
10 - It's not rocket science

Oxford researchers list top 10 most annoying sayings (http://blog.wired.com/underwire/2008/11/oxford-research.html)

Highlifeman21
03-21-2009, 10:31 AM
"I don't disagree"

So what, you agree? Just say what you mean already. Those are weasel words.

Corporate America slang

jmcclain19
03-21-2009, 11:42 AM
the cliché giving 110%.

It's so mind numbingly stupid - you can't possibly give more than 100%.

vaticanplum
03-21-2009, 11:44 AM
Corporate America slang

I don't know, I think there's a subtle difference between those two things. "I don't disagree" implies a but + further opinion, whereas "I agree" is a lot more conciliatory.

This is not to say there isn't corporate speak that I find insane. Laundry list comes to mind.

vaticanplum
03-21-2009, 11:46 AM
Drives me crazy. Always has.

http://a5.vox.com/6a00cd971973d74cd50109810f021d000c-500pi

:D

OldRightHander
03-21-2009, 12:14 PM
Can we stop throwing people under the bus as well?

TeamSelig
03-21-2009, 12:42 PM
"Please don't touch me there."

TeamCasey
03-21-2009, 12:59 PM
"TMI"

It is SO completely rude!

Blimpie
03-21-2009, 01:08 PM
"Ir-regardless"
"What happens in XX, stays in XX"
"OMG"
"With that being said..."

Falls City Beer
03-21-2009, 01:20 PM
Should English then eliminate all coinages? I agree that many of these expressions really are brutally overused and underfunded, but I think some idioms and expressions are great in the right circumstance.

Hap
03-21-2009, 03:15 PM
A whole 'nother (it's "another whole")

Misuse of "there, their, they're"

Supposably

What comes around goes around

Rush Limbo

Paul Simmons and Gene Stanley

noo-cue-lar

referring to Native Americans as "Indians"

automatically labeling any Asian as "Chinese"

automatically labeling any Hispanic as "Mexican"

people who think Africa is a country

Does Deion Sanders still play for the Reds?

How much does a blue seat cost at the GABP?

Do you think Pete Rose should be in the Hall Of Fame? (No, absolutely not, STOP ASKING!!!!)

Ickey Woods is the best Bengals running back of all time. (He only had one good season)

Who is James Brooks? Was he any good?

When Marty Brennaman retires, why don't you apply for his job?

Unassisted
03-21-2009, 04:20 PM
People on TV referring to snow as "the white stuff."

Hearing that makes me want to drop a balloon filled to capacity with white paint on them.

Scrap Irony
03-21-2009, 05:17 PM
"I seen.."
When talking about a conversation, someone inevitably says, "So I go..."
"I done did"
Any automatic denial, even after having seen the offense
"freakin'"
"Bob Sagett"
"That's gay"

Can you tell I teach school?

reds1869
03-21-2009, 05:43 PM
"I seen.."
When talking about a conversation, someone inevitably says, "So I go..."
"I done did"
Any automatic denial, even after having seen the offense
"freakin'"
"Bob Sagett"
"That's gay"

Can you tell I teach school?

:) As a teacher myself I would include many of the same phrases on my list. I would like to submit the dearly departed "that's wack" as well. I'm very glad that one has lost its currency.

I just thought of another one: when people say "chise" instead of franchise. Seriously, that does NOT make you sound cool.

camisadelgolf
03-21-2009, 05:56 PM
I can't stand people saying "no homo".

nineworldseries
03-21-2009, 06:09 PM
1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"

You're right, but pink is an adjective.

Rojo
03-21-2009, 06:29 PM
I actually LOVE IT when people use nouns as verbs. Let me rephrase. I love it when people "verb" nouns in creative fashion.

I usually do too. To me there's a big distinction between tweeking the language creatively and just repeating tired cliches.

What bothers me is the increasing use of the second person with an assumed universal "you". For example, someone will recount some event and they say something like, "you see it happening and you can't believe it....."

OldRightHander
03-21-2009, 08:22 PM
You're right, but pink is an adjective.

Yeah, but the same darn thing. It drives me nuts every time that ad comes on. It was the first example that came to mind.

BUTLER REDSFAN
03-21-2009, 08:41 PM
In baseball I really hate it when they use the term "base knock"...have always hated that

Falls City Beer
03-21-2009, 09:02 PM
What I don't like is when people say "utilize" when "use" is fine. The word or expression should match the intent, but not overshoot it. When the situation calls for a big word because that word correctly captures the shading of meaning intended, then great; otherwise, economize.

Most of my biases come from Strunk & White, 11th grade, circa 1982.

klw
03-21-2009, 09:19 PM
"Due to budget positions we are terminating your position"

JBChance
03-21-2009, 11:53 PM
One of the guys I've worked with for years says this:

"It's just like anything else."

He uses it to describe just about every situation he comes across. In one particular conversation (more like an argument), I asked him what he meant by that. (in a lot more colorful terms - I can't repeat here what I really said)

He had no answer. That made him even more angry. Especially, when I started to laugh :D

edabbs44
03-22-2009, 12:12 AM
Can you tell I teach school?

"Teach school" is a bit weird...:)

But anyway, my latest pet peeve is the phrase "factually correct". Do we really have to specify when something is factually correct? Can something be correct in a factual way and incorrect in another way?

Not a big supporter of that phrase.

goreds2
03-22-2009, 02:35 AM
"Due to budget positions we are terminating your position"

Budgets "contsraints" or positions? :confused:

RFS62
03-22-2009, 08:10 AM
But anyway, my latest pet peeve is the phrase "factually correct". Do we really have to specify when something is factually correct? Can something be correct in a factual way and incorrect in another way?



Here you go.

While it is factually correct that Puffy is 40 years old now, he certainly doesn't act like a real life adult.

Hope that helps.

:pimp:

FlightRick
03-22-2009, 08:31 AM
In a lot of ways, I consider myself the poster boy for Being Easily Annoyed (or, to turn it into a phrase that might irk some of YOU, I have a perpetually Sandy Vagina).

Yet, seeing all these things listed and railed against in one place makes me realize I'm probably rather forgiving on this front. I think years of writing for audiences and trying to sort out what things I do are genuinely entertaining and what are genuinely hacky and what are cases where some idiotic (perhaps jealous) minority of said audience begins railing against MY beloved rhetorical crutches has led me to an a point of odd ambivilance on this issue: it's all just words, and what counts is the meaning behind the words. I'm not saying there shouldn't be some thought put into the packaging, I'm just saying: buy the product, not the box.

Or at least, if you're going to be taking the time to complain, it had better be about the content, and not about the presentation. That's what I have trained myself to believe, anyway.

To wit, there were two great examples named above: the "It is what it is" and the flaccid corporate-slang type stuff like "I don't disagree." On their own, both of those are the sorts of things that get my Slapping Hand all warmed up and tingly... but that's when I have to tell myself "settle down," perhaps someone is just being a tinch lazy or doesn't want to waste your time with a full explanation of their thoughts, so they are supplying an easy catch-all cliche, pending the presentation of an Insightful Follow-Up Question. So it's on *me* to figure out which is lacking here...

If I follow-up, and Spanky McGee can't expand upon his ideas, then fine: it was the CONTENT that was broken, and the crappy box he wrapped it in was an accurate representation. I simply file that away and remember to try to never talk to Spanky again, or to know ahead of time that he is bordering on clinical retardation anytime I do have to talk to him. If, however, I am rewarded with am amplification of precisely "what it is" and why that's relevent to our discussion beyond a merely reflexive statement like "blue is very blue," then I know not to outright dismiss Spanky for any future displays of rhetorical laziness.

In addition to trying to get to the core content/meaning rather than obsessing over the use of words, I'll sometimes outright antagonize people if I suspect I can do it easily and without really selling my soul to the devil. For instance, I'll regularly abuse some lesser rules (especially punctuation that creates "pauses" for the eyes, like elipses or double-dashes, and abuse of "filler words" like "actually" or "kind of") to create what I hope READS like my actual voice SOUNDS in a real conversation. To some, this is annoying as all get out, like the written word has some inherently greater value than the spoken one, and must be deified. Bleh to that: I figure the joke's on the hyper-reactive posers if I manage to annoy them that badly with "Conversational Typing." It's not like I'm going 100% tard and emoticonning and LOL'ing in the name of "convenience."

Also: I purposely misuse the word "literally" as often as I can. But when I say "misuse" I mean REALLY misuse, leaving no doubt to anybody that even I (literally as dumb as a houseplant) must have done it on purpose. I think it's funny. I blame this on intense over-exposure to Gorilla Monsoon when I was in elementary school.



Rick

fourrunhomer
03-22-2009, 09:56 AM
1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"

When people call adjectives nouns.

klw
03-22-2009, 09:57 AM
Budgets "contsraints" or positions? :confused:

Sorry. Too tired.
"Due to budget problems, we are terminating your position"

Yachtzee
03-22-2009, 11:17 AM
1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"

When people call adjectives nouns.

I don't like the corporate trend of making nouns out of adjectives. The word "deliverables" drives me up a wall and it's marketing cousin "botanicals" isn't far behind.

OldRightHander
03-22-2009, 11:45 AM
When people call adjectives nouns.

Only two people caught it. Hmm...

edabbs44
03-22-2009, 03:35 PM
Here you go.

While it is factually correct that Puffy is 40 years old now, he certainly doesn't act like a real life adult.

Hope that helps.

:pimp:

Unsure if you were joking or not, but it really doesn't help.

Spitball
03-22-2009, 04:07 PM
1. Nouns are not verbs. It drives me nuts when people use them as verbs. One recent one is a radio commercial about wearing pink for breast cancer awareness and they're saying "Who do you pink for?" Every time I hear it I want to scream at the radio, "Pink is not a verb!"

When people call adjectives nouns.

Actually, I appreciate and enjoy creative language expression as long as the meaning is not totally blurred. Formal language expression can be boring. Creative language can be used to create humor and poetry to our language.

RedsBaron
03-22-2009, 09:05 PM
I don't like the phrase "this is a win-win" proposition. Yes, sometimes both sides win, but that usually isn't the case when someone tries to convince everyone to agree by insisting that it is a "win-win" deal.
"Aren't I" is a phrase that has always amused me. The speaker presumably would not say "I are......", but in trying to avoid saying "I ain't" and not knowing to say "am I not," "aren't I" is the phrase spoken.

WebScorpion
03-23-2009, 12:46 PM
"I seen.."
When talking about a conversation, someone inevitably says, "So I go..."
"I done did"
Any automatic denial, even after having seen the offense
"freakin'"
"Bob Sagett"
"That's gay"

Can you tell I teach school?
No, but I can tell you're in Kentucky. :D

smith288
03-23-2009, 01:14 PM
"I seen.."
When talking about a conversation, someone inevitably says, "So I go..."
"I done did"
Any automatic denial, even after having seen the offense
"freakin'"
"Bob Sagett"
"That's gay"

Can you tell I teach school?
I've heard every one of those in a conversation but "Bob Sagett"? In what context is that uttered?

Blimpie
03-23-2009, 01:25 PM
Oh, yeah...

"At the end of the day..."

Needs to go bye-bye, as well.

Cant Touch This
03-23-2009, 02:13 PM
My friend and I were having this discussion last week. One he mentioned that didn't bother me until he mentioned it is: "Isn't it though?"

For example:
Can't Touch This: "It's freezing out there today."
Someone Else: "Isn't it though?"

I told him the next time someone says that I'm going to reply negatively.

Can't Touch This: "This is the most exciting game I've seen all week!"
Someone Else: "Isn't it though?!"
Can't Touch This: "No. What game are you watching?"

My list includes:

The use of the article "an" before words that start with a pronounced H. The most commonly heard is "an historic." I shall not accept any explanation to justify this blatant grammatical liberty. It is made up and pretentious.

An earlier variation to theme of taking random grammatical liberties is when people starting pronouncing the T in the word often. The T is silent. At least it was silent. More ofTen than not, I hear the T. I think people who did that were trying to sounds smarter, and now it's so commonly heard that I think most people don't even know the T is supposed to be silent.

I wonder when people are going to start pronouncing the S in Illinois...?

bucksfan
03-23-2009, 02:20 PM
- the "nu-cue-lar" someone else mentioned is at the top of my list.

- in a more general sense, when some reporter asks someone (typically in sports), "So how happy/sad were you when event X happened/didn't happen?". How in the world is someone supposed to answer a question like that??? My answer would always be
"7" and nothing more. It is the laziest and least purposeful question I can think of to ask someone over the age of 9.

I don't have real problems with different expressions. etc. Some I may not like so well, some may seem cheesey/corny/overused, but in general I try not to let that stuff get to me. What I don't like are when people flat out say things incorrectly.

smith288
03-23-2009, 02:30 PM
I like saying "nuke-ular" because it annoys people.

Rojo
03-23-2009, 02:42 PM
The "nukeular" thing never bothered me but I always wondered about kids who couldn't pronounce spaghetti.

WebScorpion
03-23-2009, 04:48 PM
My friend and I were having this discussion last week. One he mentioned that didn't bother me until he mentioned it is: "Isn't it though?"

For example:
Can't Touch This: "It's freezing out there today."
Someone Else: "Isn't it though?"

I told him the next time someone says that I'm going to reply negatively.

Can't Touch This: "This is the most exciting game I've seen all week!"
Someone Else: "Isn't it though?!"
Can't Touch This: "No. What game are you watching?"

My list includes:

The use of the article "an" before words that start with a pronounced H. The most commonly heard is "an historic." I shall not accept any explanation to justify this blatant grammatical liberty. It is made up and pretentious.

An earlier variation to theme of taking random grammatical liberties is when people starting pronouncing the T in the word often. The T is silent. At least it was silent. More ofTen than not, I hear the T. I think people who did that were trying to sounds smarter, and now it's so commonly heard that I think most people don't even know the T is supposed to be silent.

I wonder when people are going to start pronouncing the S in Illinois...?

Aren't these just differences between Oxford English and Webster's English? I think you just don't like British people. :D

Cant Touch This
03-23-2009, 04:58 PM
Aren't these just differences between Oxford English and Webster's English? I think you just don't like British people. :D

HA! Maybe that's true. Well, then if I ever move to London, I'll take what you said under consideration.

nineworldseries
03-23-2009, 05:08 PM
In baseball I really hate it when they use the term "base knock"...have always hated that

Every time George Grande says "nubber"

durl
03-23-2009, 05:16 PM
- When a "problem" is referred to as a "challenge" or an "opportunity." If it has potentially negative consequences, it's a PROBLEM. Anything else is just spin. Call it a problem and then tackle it. "Houston, we have an opportunity!" Ugh.

- And related to that, the misuse of the word "issue." I lead a meeting where people know I'm no fan of people bringing "issues" to the table. "Concerning this issue..." should be "concerning this matter." "I have an issue with this..." should be "I have a problem with this..."

smith288
03-23-2009, 05:44 PM
The "nukeular" thing never bothered me but I always wondered about kids who couldn't pronounce spaghetti.
I used to call Red Lobster, "Red Losper"

RichRed
03-23-2009, 07:54 PM
An earlier variation to theme of taking random grammatical liberties is when people starting pronouncing the T in the word often. The T is silent. At least it was silent. More ofTen than not, I hear the T. I think people who did that were trying to sounds smarter, and now it's so commonly heard that I think most people don't even know the T is supposed to be silent.

I wonder when people are going to start pronouncing the S in Illinois...?

Yes, absolutely agree about the T in often. I started hearing teachers say it in the early 80s and thought it was weird even then. Knowing someone else is bothered by this helps to sofTen the blow.

Oh, and I HAVE heard people pronounce the S in Illinois. Yikes.

UKFlounder
03-23-2009, 09:32 PM
"I'd like to...." (such as "I'd like to thank") - if you would like to do so, then just do it, instead of saying you want to (i.e. say "Thank you" instead of "I'd like to thank you.")

It's not a huge deal, unless I find myself saying it, in which case I wonder why I have to resort to something like that.

Also the phrase "past history" is a bit of a pet peeve as well.

RedsBaron
03-24-2009, 07:31 AM
I like saying "nuke-ular" because it annoys people.

I have always been amused when the mispronouncing of "nuclear" annoys people, particularly those people who are not bothered by the mispronunciation of "Cuba" and "Caribbean."

Johnny Footstool
03-24-2009, 11:10 AM
EYE-talian.

Also, "There is no 'I' in T-E-A-M." Correct, but there is an 'M' and an 'E'.

reds44
03-24-2009, 11:21 AM
The misuse of the word literally.

"He literally came out of nowhere."
"They literally picked him off the scrapheap."
"It's literally raining cats and dogs."

OldRightHander
03-24-2009, 02:20 PM
Have I mentioned "they" used to refer to a singular subject? I know we had that debate before, but that is one of my biggest pet peeves.

camisadelgolf
03-24-2009, 02:51 PM
I hate it when people say "guys and girls" instead of "boys and girls" or "guys and gals".

Dom Heffner
03-24-2009, 02:59 PM
She looked like a dream girl as I was drinking . . .

"I never went to bed with an unattractive person, but I woke with a bunch."

Unassisted
03-24-2009, 03:21 PM
- the "nu-cue-lar" someone else mentioned is at the top of my list.
My son and I were touring a big university a couple of weeks back. The tour guide asked everyone what they planned to major in. One girl proudly answered "nucular engineering." We decided afterward that we hoped one doesn't have to pronounce that correctly to do it correctly.

MasonBuzz3
03-24-2009, 03:33 PM
"fyi" drives me crazy, basically any any string of words shortened to a couple of letters is lame
and the use of "good" instead of "well"

bucksfan
03-24-2009, 03:46 PM
I have always been amused when the mispronouncing of "nuclear" annoys people, particularly those people who are not bothered by the mispronunciation of "Cuba" and "Caribbean."

Phonetically I can at least account for many mispronunciations. I cannot follow the "logic" that leads to the common mispronunciation of "nuclear" (because there isn't any).

RedsFaninAfrica
10-03-2012, 09:02 PM
"You're under arrest."

I'm still laughing.

Dom Heffner
10-04-2012, 01:48 AM
I'm still laughing.

I'll say!

klw
10-04-2012, 09:52 AM
"24/7"

"he disrespected me"

goreds2
10-04-2012, 06:39 PM
I have not read through this entire thread.

When someone says, "This is my LAST cigarette". It never usually happens.

Red in Chicago
10-04-2012, 08:53 PM
It's too big :laugh:

Yachtzee
10-04-2012, 09:26 PM
Kids using "tbh" (to be honest) incorrectly. For example, "tbh, you seem nice." It seems like there should be a "but. . ." following it up. "Tbh you seem nice, but I heard you still wet the bed."

camisadelgolf
10-04-2012, 09:30 PM
Kids using "tbh" (to be honest) incorrectly. For example, "tbh, you seem nice." It seems like there should be a "but. . ." following it up. "Tbh you seem nice, but I heard you still wet the bed."
It doesn't bother me at all tbqh.

camisadelgolf
10-04-2012, 09:35 PM
"You have received an infraction at RedsZone.com - Cincinnati Reds Fans' Home for Baseball Discussion"

goreds2
10-04-2012, 11:01 PM
It's too big :laugh:

http://0.tqn.com/d/politicalhumor/1/0/1/C/clinton_laughing.jpg

SunDeck
10-05-2012, 09:48 AM
The awful phrase "Going forward" has been widely adopted as execuspeak in the last couple of years, a term that I'm sure these people have seized upon because it sounds so active, as if they think it can turn even the worst news into something that is part of the strategic plan.

"We foresee significant negative revenue going forward", to the lazy ear could almost sound reassuring.

What ever happened to using the word "future" to mean "future"?

mole44
10-05-2012, 12:34 PM
When you ask someone what time it is and they say 5:00, when its really 4:53. It is not 5, its 4:53, don't be lazy.

RedsFaninAfrica
10-06-2012, 09:33 AM
Grammatical errors, slang, improper word choice - none of that irritates me anymore

What irritates me is when they say:
Where'd you get all that gray hair?
You're hearing ain't what it used to be
You're zipper's down ... again
You look constipated
Your wife looks a lot younger than you

Dom Heffner
10-06-2012, 06:25 PM
"Help me understand."

That is management speak amd it drives me crazy.

RBA
10-06-2012, 07:39 PM
"Help me understand."

That is management speak amd it drives me crazy.

"Educate me."

757690
10-06-2012, 07:54 PM
"Think harder"

I can push harder, run harder, pull harder, hit harder, but how do I think harder?

RBA
10-06-2012, 08:43 PM
Make it quick.

TeamSelig
10-08-2012, 02:02 AM
When you ask someone what time it is and they say 5:00, when its really 4:53. It is not 5, its 4:53, don't be lazy.

I hate asking someone what time it is and they say "quarter til"

Quarter til what MFer?! I asked what time it was

SunDeck
10-08-2012, 09:14 AM
"In regards to..."

Usually said by people who are trying to fake a more technical sounding speech than they are capable of.

RichRed
10-08-2012, 11:41 AM
The epidemic of "I know, right?" and "Really? Really?"

krm1580
10-08-2012, 11:44 AM
The word "like" when it is every other word in a sentence. Such as:

So, I like went to the store to get Oreos and they were like out. So I asked the manager, like where are the Oreos and he was like we are out. I was like seriously and he was like yeah.

SunDeck
10-08-2012, 11:57 AM
The epidemic of "I know, right?" and "Really? Really?"

"Yeah, yeah, yeah".

Red Buckeye
10-08-2012, 02:24 PM
Something I've noticed lately in message boards and on some of my friends facebook pages (I don't have a facebook page but have seen others) is people don't form complete sentences.

Example: Dude's a beast! (You mean: That dude's a beast?)

Example: Getting ready to take shower, take Bob to grocery. (You mean: I'm getting ready to take a shower, and then I am taking Bob to the grocery)

Example: Can't decide between pizza and wings (You mean: I can't decide between pizza and wings)


I know some will say it's just to save time, but I with this trend becoming more and more common I wonder what things will look like 10 years from now.

Rojo
10-08-2012, 03:46 PM
Something I've noticed lately in message boards and on some of my friends facebook pages (I don't have a facebook page but have seen others) is people don't form complete sentences.

Do it all the time.

Red Buckeye
10-08-2012, 03:56 PM
Do it all the time.

There are so many people that do it. Well it certainly bugs me, but I don't make the rules so oh well.

camisadelgolf
10-08-2012, 04:26 PM
Do it all the time.
Don't tell him what to do!

RBA
10-09-2012, 12:25 AM
Do it all the time.

:D

puca
10-09-2012, 08:06 AM
I hate asking someone what time it is and they say "quarter til"

Quarter til what MFer?! I asked what time it was

I hate it when people ask me what time it is.

redhawkfish
10-09-2012, 09:04 AM
I hate it when people ask me what time it is.

Ditto for me. Buy a watch or look at your cell phone!

919191
10-09-2012, 09:13 AM
I hate it when people ask me what time it is.

I somrtimes answer "Right now?"

sonny
10-09-2012, 10:37 AM
"Oh em gee"

BuckeyeRed27
10-09-2012, 05:49 PM
Something I've noticed lately in message boards and on some of my friends facebook pages (I don't have a facebook page but have seen others) is people don't form complete sentences.

Example: Dude's a beast! (You mean: That dude's a beast?)

Example: Getting ready to take shower, take Bob to grocery. (You mean: I'm getting ready to take a shower, and then I am taking Bob to the grocery)

Example: Can't decide between pizza and wings (You mean: I can't decide between pizza and wings)


I know some will say it's just to save time, but I with this trend becoming more and more common I wonder what things will look like 10 years from now.

That's funny. My Mom types if full sentences and paragraphs on Facebook and it drives me crazy. I just don't find it the medium to have proper spelling and what not.

TeamSelig
10-10-2012, 11:29 AM
I somrtimes answer "Right now?"

:lol: nice

TeamSelig
10-10-2012, 11:31 AM
That's funny. My Mom types if full sentences and paragraphs on Facebook and it drives me crazy. I just don't find it the medium to have proper spelling and what not.

I agree. Facebook isn't where you go to write out essays. It drives me nuts seeing tons of spelling mistakes and sentences that made no sense, but there is no way I am reading anyones paragraph

mdccclxix
10-10-2012, 02:11 PM
I don't like it when someone says "real" as an adverb instead of "really". I do it sometimes myself, but I try not to.

"That's real cool." "It was real big." "That's real far." Ugh, just pronounce the word.

I also, as I get older, don't like goddammit, jesus christ, etc, just personal preference. Have some respect. There's a million curse words out there. And with that...

I don't like curse words anymore. I have a nasty habit of cursing and realize it impairs my conversation technique as I go different places. Like family holidays with 4 and 5 year olds. I don't want to be that adult that sets a bad example.

Rojo
10-10-2012, 03:34 PM
I don't like curse words anymore. I have a nasty habit of cursing and realize it impairs my conversation technique as I go different places. Like family holidays with 4 and 5 year olds. I don't want to be that adult that sets a bad example.

I think you curse less as you get older. I don't use the s-word and f-word casually any more. I'm not a prude about it -- just "time and place".

Dom Heffner
10-10-2012, 09:10 PM
The epidemic of "I know, right?" and "Really? Really?"

Or when they just say'"Right?"

Gosh that drives me nuts.

kpresidente
10-11-2012, 02:14 PM
I hate fashionable words and phrases. English is a language, not an outfit.

"bizarre"
"demonstrably false"
"no worries"
Starting your sentence with the word "So..."

sonny
10-11-2012, 06:07 PM
"Reds Manager Dusty Baker"

RBA
10-11-2012, 09:17 PM
"We are the Champions" STL Cardinals fans 2012 (hopefully not)

edabbs44
10-11-2012, 09:59 PM
Wrap my head around it.

I have no idea what that means.

757690
10-11-2012, 10:23 PM
Giants win the NLDS :(

Roy Tucker
10-12-2012, 12:26 AM
"I'm just saying"

"Whatever"

camisadelgolf
10-12-2012, 02:33 AM
"Your fly's down."

Did it ever occur to people that sometimes I want my fly down?

Wonderful Monds
10-12-2012, 03:05 AM
Something I've noticed lately in message boards and on some of my friends facebook pages (I don't have a facebook page but have seen others) is people don't form complete sentences.

Example: Dude's a beast! (You mean: That dude's a beast?)

Example: Getting ready to take shower, take Bob to grocery. (You mean: I'm getting ready to take a shower, and then I am taking Bob to the grocery)

Example: Can't decide between pizza and wings (You mean: I can't decide between pizza and wings)


I know some will say it's just to save time, but I with this trend becoming more and more common I wonder what things will look like 10 years from now.

Don't mind that, it's almost always readily implied.

camisadelgolf
10-12-2012, 08:00 AM
It irritates me when people complain about how people say things even though there is no confusion or misunderstanding in what's being said. I used to be guilty of it at one time, but now I feel like I "grew out of it".

goreds2
10-15-2012, 07:30 AM
I have not read through this entire thread.

When someone says, "This is my LAST cigarette". It never usually happens.

This weekend, a couple visited and we were hanging out in the garage watching the Buckeyes. She says to her boyfriend, "I'll quit smoking if you do".

How many times have we heard this?

Very sad how addictive this habit is though.

PedroBourbon
10-15-2012, 12:13 PM
"It's surreal" or "It was so surreal"

"Your account is overdrawn"

"license, registration, and proof of insurance please"

camisadelgolf
10-15-2012, 06:11 PM
This weekend, a couple visited and we were hanging out in the garage watching the Buckeyes. She says to her boyfriend, "I'll quit smoking if you do".

How many times have we heard this?

Very sad how addictive this habit is though.
I recently tried to quit and got unbelievably cranky (to put it lightly). For the most part, if you're surrounded by smokers, you're screwed. I'm just going to have to wait for a time when I don't expect to interact with people for a while because I can't expect people to have enough patience for me without a cigarette.

Yachtzee
10-16-2012, 03:00 AM
I don't like it when someone says "real" as an adverb instead of "really". I do it sometimes myself, but I try not to.

"That's real cool." "It was real big." "That's real far." Ugh, just pronounce the word.



I believe that tendency comes from the influence of German on American English and is common in the Midwest, where large populations of German immigrants influenced the vernacular. In German, some words are the same in adjective and adverb form. The word for "real" in German is "echt." However, "echt" can also mean "really" depending on context. So a German would say "Das ist echt cool" (yes, many young Germans say "cool") or "Das ist echt Gross" and it would translate as "That is real/really cool" or "That is real/really big." Another example would be "langsam," meaning "slow/slowly." A German would say " Bitte, langsam fahren" to mean "please, drive slow/slowly." As the German lacks a distinct adverb form, German immigrants likely used the adjective form for both.

SunDeck
10-16-2012, 09:48 AM
I believe that tendency comes from the influence of German on American English and is common in the Midwest, where large populations of German immigrants influenced the vernacular. In German, some words are the same in adjective and adverb form. The word for "real" in German is "echt." However, "echt" can also mean "really" depending on context. So a German would say "Das ist echt cool" (yes, many young Germans say "cool") or "Das ist echt Gross" and it would translate as "That is real/really cool" or "That is real/really big." Another example would be "langsam," meaning "slow/slowly." A German would say " Bitte, langsam fahren" to mean "please, drive slow/slowly." As the German lacks a distinct adverb form, German immigrants likely used the adjective form for both.

Genau.

OldRightHander
10-17-2012, 09:41 AM
I've always thought that most improper grammar is simply laziness.

mdccclxix
10-17-2012, 10:15 AM
I believe that tendency comes from the influence of German on American English and is common in the Midwest, where large populations of German immigrants influenced the vernacular. In German, some words are the same in adjective and adverb form. The word for "real" in German is "echt." However, "echt" can also mean "really" depending on context. So a German would say "Das ist echt cool" (yes, many young Germans say "cool") or "Das ist echt Gross" and it would translate as "That is real/really cool" or "That is real/really big." Another example would be "langsam," meaning "slow/slowly." A German would say " Bitte, langsam fahren" to mean "please, drive slow/slowly." As the German lacks a distinct adverb form, German immigrants likely used the adjective form for both.

Interesting. I actually took German, so I recall what you are referring to.

camisadelgolf
10-17-2012, 02:02 PM
"bitte" is why Cincinnatians are known for saying "Please?" instead of "What?" when we don't understand something.

OldRightHander
10-17-2012, 04:45 PM
"bitte" is why Cincinnatians are known for saying "Please?" instead of "What?" when we don't understand something.

I grew up in Brown County and didn't hear the please thing much. So when I was in my 20s working at UDF, a customer ordered a hot fudge sundae and I asked her if she wanted nuts on it. Se said please, so I proceeded to put the nuts on it. She then said that she didn't want nuts on her sundae and I was confused because I assumed by saying please she was saying yes, and rather politely.

texasdave
10-18-2012, 07:58 PM
Born and raised in Cincinnati and we were taught to say "please" if we did not understand what the person said. In Texas you either get "what" or "huh".

camisadelgolf
10-18-2012, 09:09 PM
I've gotten in the bad habit of saying, "Come again?"

Dom Heffner
10-18-2012, 10:11 PM
I've gotten in the bad habit of saying, "Come again?"

Whether that's annoying or not depends on the circumstance lol...

Hoosier Red
10-18-2012, 11:29 PM
The thread is over three year's old, so I'm sure I pointed this out before. But I absolutely hate the word incentivize.

No you provide incentives, you do not incentivize. I have promised any person who's not bigger than me a punch in the nose if they use the word incentivize.

Johnny Footstool
10-18-2012, 11:45 PM
All corporate buzzwords.

Especially "leverage" used as a verb.

SunDeck
10-19-2012, 09:21 AM
Whether that's annoying or not depends on the circumstance lol...

:lol:

OldRightHander
10-19-2012, 12:38 PM
All corporate buzzwords.

Especially "leverage" used as a verb.

Any non verb used as a verb tends to annoy the daylights out of me.

RichRed
10-19-2012, 02:24 PM
The thread is over three year's old, so I'm sure I pointed this out before. But I absolutely hate the word incentivize.

No you provide incentives, you do not incentivize. I have promised any person who's not bigger than me a punch in the nose if they use the word incentivize.

Uh-oh, the word "incentive" just got verbed.

/trying to blow ORH's mind

Redsfan320
10-19-2012, 02:37 PM
"That'll be due next class"
"There will be an exam next class/week/Friday"

320

OldRightHander
10-19-2012, 04:01 PM
"I'm not racist, but..."

texasdave
10-19-2012, 04:03 PM
We are efforting....

camisadelgolf
10-19-2012, 05:17 PM
"Drew Stubbs strikes out too much."

Thank you, Captain Obvious. Even when he's playing well, people still hang on to that, and that's when it really bothers me.

Wonderful Monds
10-19-2012, 06:00 PM
"(wherever)-bound" whenever talking about going on a trip somewhere. I've noticed like everyone is saying that now, and I have no idea where they picked up on it from.

foxfire123
10-21-2012, 01:00 AM
"You live in St Louis, you have to be a Cardinals fan now!"

Remember that if you ever move to Chicago Cardinals fans. :P

Tools of Ignorance
10-23-2012, 12:14 AM
I believe the life of a teenager can be reduced to three sayings that I abhor:

1. "I know". They think they know everything and don't want to hear a differing opinion. So they ignore any input into their behavior.
2. "I was just....." This somehow justifies anything they have done or said. It is meant to justify #1 when it turns out poorly.

And then when you try to teach them you get (after arguing for a while),
3. "My bad". A very complicated statement in two words as it means that they are taking the blame (sort of), that the conversation is now closed for discussion, and all repercussions should be eliminated as it is somehow a pardon due to the admission.

WDE
10-28-2012, 12:05 AM
When people say, "You know, you just never know."

Roy Tucker
10-28-2012, 12:13 AM
Any non verb used as a verb tends to annoy the daylights out of me.

You mean when they verbalize a word?

;)

WDE
10-28-2012, 12:36 AM
"I'm not trying to be mean, but..." The next few words are usually pretty mean.

fearofpopvol1
10-29-2012, 12:54 AM
"I'm so old!" when said person is younger than you are.

gilpdawg
10-29-2012, 04:34 AM
"Well that's just your opinion."

No kidding jackwagon. Who else's opinion am I going to vocalize? The guy down the street? Pretty much anything anybody says is "just their opinion" unless it's something like "hey man, the sky is blue."

camisadelgolf
10-29-2012, 04:44 AM
http://1-media-cdn.foolz.us/ffuuka/board/a/image/1337/77/1337770427623.jpg

camisadelgolf
10-29-2012, 04:48 AM
"I'm German-Irish."

Oh, really? You're a citizen of Germany and Ireland?

"No, my great-grandpa was Irish, and my great-great-grandma on my mom's side was German."

Oh. So you mean you're American?

camisadelgolf
10-29-2012, 04:49 AM
"'It's now very common to hear people say, "I'm rather offended by that", as if that gives them certain rights. It's no more than a whine. It has no meaning, it has no purpose, it has no reason to be respected as a phrase. "I'm offended by that." Well, so what?'"
-Stephen Fry

traderumor
10-29-2012, 11:53 AM
The epidemic of "I know, right?" and "Really? Really?"
:beerme:

Cooper
10-30-2012, 12:03 AM
transparent.....i hear it 20 times a day ...every company has to be transparent.

gilpdawg
10-30-2012, 01:52 AM
http://1-media-cdn.foolz.us/ffuuka/board/a/image/1337/77/1337770427623.jpg
Mark it zero! This is a league game!

jhiller21
10-30-2012, 08:47 AM
The one that drives me up the wall is when people incorrectly use 'literally'.

This one is incredibly overused (and wrongly used) by new reporters.

I remember during hurricane Katrina, the idiot standing in the wind said "New Orleans is LITERALLY a ghost town"

So, what there's ghosts flying all over downtown and scaring people? No one knows what "literal" means anymore.

jhiller21
10-30-2012, 08:57 AM
Also, "Like I said..."

We already know what you said, you're just using that as an excuse to repeat yourself.

jhiller21
10-30-2012, 09:17 AM
One more, as already mentioned, using nouns as verbs.

Specifically that Mitt Romney commercial where he says "Champion small business"

How do you "champion" something? That's like saying "I'm going to food my dinner now"

camisadelgolf
10-30-2012, 04:00 PM
I quit drinking, and now I'm sick of hearing all my alcoholic friends apologize every time the topic of alcohol comes up. "Sorry that we're talking about beer, man." Um, I can talk about beer. I'm just not drinking it. Stop making it weird for everybody.

kaldaniels
10-30-2012, 04:13 PM
One more, as already mentioned, using nouns as verbs.

Specifically that Mitt Romney commercial where he says "Champion small business"

How do you "champion" something? That's like saying "I'm going to food my dinner now"

I don't see the problem with the word champion. I've always known it to be a verb, as well as a noun.

Champion the verb does not mean "to win or to be the best", it means "to defend/support".

kaldaniels
10-30-2012, 04:17 PM
This one is incredibly overused (and wrongly used) by new reporters.

I remember during hurricane Katrina, the idiot standing in the wind said "New Orleans is LITERALLY a ghost town"

So, what there's ghosts flying all over downtown and scaring people? No one knows what "literal" means anymore.

That meaning of the word "literally" is now an accepted form as far as Merriam Webster is concerned.

So it is in-bounds for the "new reporters" you speak of to use it in that way. (I would argue that as long as the audience knows you don't truly mean it to be actually true, you are ok) i.e. not a person in the world thought the reporter really meant there were ghosts flying around.

jhiller21
10-31-2012, 07:23 AM
So it is in-bounds for the "new reporters" you speak of

Thanks for pointing out that I missed that "s" on "news". It makes me feel better that there are people online making sure we don't miss a key when typing ;)

marcshoe
10-31-2012, 01:32 PM
That meaning of the word "literally" is now an accepted form as far as Merriam Webster is concerned.

So it is in-bounds for the "new reporters" you speak of to use it in that way. (I would argue that as long as the audience knows you don't truly mean it to be actually true, you are ok) i.e. not a person in the world thought the reporter really meant there were ghosts flying around.

New Orleans? Are you sure?

Bob Sheed
11-05-2012, 12:17 PM
New Orleans? Are you sure?

Exactly. New Orleans actually might literally be a ghost town. :D

foxfire123
11-07-2012, 06:50 PM
Insurance companies who put you on hold because you just KNOW that you're going to get hung up on....

camisadelgolf
11-07-2012, 07:27 PM
Insurance companies who put you on hold because you just KNOW that you're going to get hung up on....
I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that before.

foxfire123
11-07-2012, 07:31 PM
I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that before.

4 times today, just to correct their mistake. One of them even had the cojones to tell me *I* hung up on him. Um yeah, cuz I just LOVE your hold music so much.... :thumbdown:

SunDeck
11-08-2012, 01:43 PM
I always laugh to myself at the people who hang up when we park their calls, only to call back again to me they got "cut off". Yes sir, our phone system just disconnects people randomly.

foxfire123
11-08-2012, 07:37 PM
I assure you SunDeck, that *I* did not hang up--they'd put me on hold and within a minute-dialtone.

Like I would WANT to prolong dealing with these turds.

LoganBuck
11-09-2012, 11:20 PM
Ok here is one that makes me mad "drinking the koolaid". What makes me mad is people that say "drinking the koolaid" that have no idea of what they are talking about. I feel a little like a very annoying Sheldon Cooper, when I explain Jonestown.

Wonderful Monds
11-10-2012, 12:00 AM
I assure you SunDeck, that *I* did not hang up--they'd put me on hold and within a minute-dialtone.

Like I would WANT to prolong dealing with these turds.

Yeah. I get that a lot too, it definitely happens with some degree of frequency.

TeamSelig
11-10-2012, 02:33 AM
I quit drinking


things people say that irriate me ;)

camisadelgolf
11-10-2012, 06:23 AM
things people say that irriate me ;)
It only annoys me when people start back up within days of saying it. It's only been a few months for me, and I work in bars. I'm certainly not making it easy on myself.

mth123
11-10-2012, 08:17 AM
I absolutely hate it when some complete stranger, usually a waitress or a fast food worker, calls me hon'. As in, "here's your food, hon'," or "Would you would like anything else, hon'?"

I'm not your hon'. I don't even know your name. I can understand it a little when some woman in her 60s says it. but it absolutely drives me up a wall when some teenage kid at the drive through window says it.

Red in Chicago
11-10-2012, 11:07 AM
Fiscal cliff. I've heard it 500 times this morning alone.

Rojo
11-13-2012, 04:56 PM
"I'm older than I look"

No. You aren't.

texasdave
11-13-2012, 07:41 PM
Fiscal cliff. I've heard it 500 times this morning alone.

I agree. If I hear that phrase one more time I may jump off a physical cliff.

SunDeck
11-13-2012, 09:22 PM
I agree. If I hear that phrase one more time I may jump off a physical cliff.

That made me laugh out loud- I used to work with an office manager who actually said "Physical Year".
And nobody could bring themselves to correct the poor woman.

Roy Tucker
11-13-2012, 11:57 PM
I absolutely hate it when some complete stranger, usually a waitress or a fast food worker, calls me hon'. As in, "here's your food, hon'," or "Would you would like anything else, hon'?"

I'm not your hon'. I don't even know your name. I can understand it a little when some woman in her 60s says it. but it absolutely drives me up a wall when some teenage kid at the drive through window says it.

Also when the wait staff calls my table "guys". As in "hi guys, what can I get you guys tonight".

I don't mind it if its the bar wench getting a round of brews at the local dive, but when I'm paying good money for food, I don't like being called "guys" like they are my best buddy and they're going to wander out to the kitchen to make me a baloney and american cheese sandwich with Miracle Whip on white bread.

camisadelgolf
11-14-2012, 05:02 AM
Also when the wait staff calls my table "guys". As in "hi guys, what can I get you guys tonight".

I don't mind it if its the bar wench getting a round of brews at the local dive, but when I'm paying good money for food, I don't like being called "guys" like they are my best buddy and they're going to wander out to the kitchen to make me a baloney and american cheese sandwich with Miracle Whip on white bread.
Speaking of which, I don't like it when people call a group of people "guys" when females are included. I also hate it when people say "guys and girls". It's "boys and girls" or "guys and gals". Make up your mind.

mth123
11-14-2012, 06:44 AM
Put me down for hating it when people say "axe" when what they mean is "ask."

I cringe every time.

OldRightHander
11-14-2012, 09:11 AM
The tendency to think every business name has to have an S on the end. You can shop at Kroger and Meijer, not Krogers and Meijers.

RichRed
11-14-2012, 11:12 AM
How come no one knows how to pronounce "realty" and "Realtor?" Hint: it's not "reel-uh-tee" and "reel-uh-tor."

Bob Sheed
11-14-2012, 12:48 PM
Put me down for hating it when people say "axe" when what they mean is "ask."

I cringe every time.

Only when they finna go to the libarry.

OldRightHander
11-14-2012, 01:28 PM
Put me down for hating it when people say "axe" when what they mean is "ask."

I cringe every time.

Honest question here about that.

Are there white folk who say this, besides Marty and Jeff goofing off on the radio? I've only ever heard black people say that.

SunDeck
11-14-2012, 02:27 PM
Honest question here about that.

Are there white folk who say this, besides Marty and Jeff goofing off on the radio? I've only ever heard black people say that.

I've heard it on the east coast- New York, Jersey, Connecticut, Philly- from plenty of white people.

OldRightHander
11-14-2012, 02:49 PM
I've heard it on the east coast- New York, Jersey, Connecticut, Philly- from plenty of white people.

I'll have to pay attention more then. I spent plenty of time on the east coast when I was driving and never really noticed that. Around here I've only heard black people say that, but I probably hang around more black folk than the average white guy, so maybe my experience is a bit skewed.

RichRed
11-14-2012, 03:25 PM
I've heard it on the east coast- New York, Jersey, Connecticut, Philly- from plenty of white people.

Yep, in addition to African-American folks, it seems to be a Northeastern white thing from my experience. Billy Joel, in his song "Don't Ask Me Why," whether jokingly or not, very clearly says at one point, "Don't AKS me why."

texasdave
11-14-2012, 05:45 PM
Ec cetera instead of et cetera bothers me.

RichRed
11-14-2012, 05:49 PM
Ec cetera instead of et cetera bothers me.

Exscape.

Ravenlord
11-14-2012, 05:55 PM
using annoying shortcuts like A-Rod, J-Lo, LoMo, FeLo; that crap i find beyond useless. . . epecially since i'm out-of-touch enough to not no who about 70% of these stupid 'Fir-Sec' abbreviations.

texasdave
11-14-2012, 06:13 PM
using annoying shortcuts like A-Rod, J-Lo, LoMo, FeLo; that crap i find beyond useless. . . epecially since i'm out-of-touch enough to not no who about 70% of these stupid 'Fir-Sec' abbreviations.

I was just thinking the same exact thing when I read someone posted BHam on the Sundeck.

texasdave
11-14-2012, 06:14 PM
And since I went to St. X, it bothers me when folks say egg-zavier instead of just zavier.

camisadelgolf
11-14-2012, 06:15 PM
It bothers me when I leave my drink at the bar and then come back to it to hear someone say, "I roofied it." It might be a funny joke if I didn't hear it pretty much every time the opportunity came up. It's unoriginal and immature in the way that when a person is tying one's shoes, someone says, "While you're down there . . . "

Rojo
11-14-2012, 06:27 PM
using annoying shortcuts like A-Rod, J-Lo, LoMo, FeLo; that crap i find beyond useless. . .

Amen, Ra-Lo.

texasdave
11-14-2012, 07:07 PM
It bothers me when I leave my drink at the bar and then come back to it to hear someone say, "I roofied it." It might be a funny joke if I didn't hear it pretty much every time the opportunity came up. It's unoriginal and immature in the way that when a person is tying one's shoes, someone says, "While you're down there . . . "

What does "roofying a drink" mean?

Redsfan320
11-14-2012, 07:25 PM
NM. I need to check facts before answering questions. Carry on.

320

bigredmechanism
11-14-2012, 07:32 PM
It bothers me when I leave my drink at the bar and then come back to it to hear someone say, "I roofied it." It might be a funny joke if I didn't hear it pretty much every time the opportunity came up. It's unoriginal and immature in the way that when a person is tying one's shoes, someone says, "While you're down there . . . "

I have spent a great deal of time in bars, and not once have I heard that. Kinda weird.

gilpdawg
11-15-2012, 03:36 AM
The tendency to think every business name has to have an S on the end. You can shop at Kroger and Meijer, not Krogers and Meijers.

That bothers me too.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

camisadelgolf
11-15-2012, 07:39 AM
What does "roofying a drink" mean?
Putting a roofie i.e. the date rape drug in a drink.

camisadelgolf
11-15-2012, 07:40 AM
I have spent a great deal of time in bars, and not once have I heard that. Kinda weird.
I'm really handsome and talk to a lot of women. Their imaginations run wild around me.

SunDeck
11-15-2012, 02:01 PM
I am being completely honest when I say that my great-great uncle was a CEO at Kroger (he was hired by Barney Kroger!), that my grandfather worked there for 50 years and just three or four weeks ago did it occur to me that I call it "Kroger's" and that I've been in error all this time.

Raisor
11-15-2012, 09:30 PM
I'm really handsome and talk to a lot of women. Their imaginations run wild around me.

http://youtu.be/rQQVGivMll4

LoganBuck
11-15-2012, 10:21 PM
I'm really handsome and talk to a lot of women. Their imaginations run wild around me.

I have that problem too, I often remind my wife how lucky she is.....

camisadelgolf
11-15-2012, 11:33 PM
I have that problem too, I often remind my wife how lucky she is.....
Yeah, that's important. I remind my girlfriends all the time.

Hap
11-20-2012, 04:17 PM
Good afternoon/evening, everyone, I'm Thom Brennaman/Joe Buck.

Dom Heffner
11-20-2012, 04:55 PM
Good afternoon/evening, everyone, I'm Thom Brennaman/Joe Buck.

Is Joe Buck in that rental car commercial?

The way he struts in that thing like he is somebody is ingratiating.

Like, I cannot stand him because of that commercial. Somebody really likes himself.

traderumor
11-21-2012, 11:21 AM
When a young person calls me "dude."

A suitor for my daughter used that several times at our first meeting. I treated him decently during his tenure, but I took note of that lack of respect for a girlfriend's father. Thankfully, she is now done with him, but not without some damage done.

MikeThierry
11-21-2012, 02:07 PM
I don't know if someone's already said this but when someone says "I could care less", it bugs me.

OldRightHander
11-21-2012, 05:09 PM
I don't know if someone's already said this but when someone says "I could care less", it bugs me.

I really could care less what you think about that.

SunDeck
11-21-2012, 05:13 PM
When a young person calls me "dude."

A suitor for my daughter used that several times at our first meeting. I treated him decently during his tenure, but I took note of that lack of respect for a girlfriend's father. Thankfully, she is now done with him, but not without some damage done.

Please take good notes, TR; I'll be needing this info in a few years. At this point, my wife is concerned that I'll meet boys at the door with a 12 gauge.

traderumor
11-21-2012, 05:51 PM
Please take good notes, TR; I'll be needing this info in a few years. At this point, my wife is concerned that I'll meet boys at the door with a 12 gauge.Yea, I don't own a shotgun, so can't help you there. :lol:

I've actually got the game plan that the one's I like, I treat them bad, snookering the daughter into thinking she is being rebellious by loving the guy I hate. The opposite strategy goes for those I want to hit the road...just shower them with praise. That should ensure that my daughter will want nothing to do with them.

Roy Tucker
11-21-2012, 10:24 PM
I've had a couple chats with my daughter's boyfriends where the conversation had phrases like "we don't do things like that in this house" and "if you want to welcomed back in this house" accompanied by skunk eyes and hulking up.

We usually got along fine after that. It was always Mr. Tucker then.

BCubb2003
11-23-2012, 04:58 PM
I really could care less what you think about that.

You've got another thing coming.

cinredsfan2000
11-23-2012, 10:27 PM
Not so much as things people say as it is culture i guess rap speak/ Ebonics or whatever it's called :eek: infuriates me to no end don't they realize they sound like idiots? Really the whole rap culture irritates me to to no end .:thumbdown:

camisadelgolf
11-24-2012, 10:23 AM
Not so much as things people say as it is culture i guess rap speak/ Ebonics or whatever it's called :eek: infuriates me to no end don't they realize they sound like idiots? Really the whole rap culture irritates me to to no end .:thumbdown:
It seems to me that you're showing a great deal of ignorance on the subject. There are literally dozens of different types of rap, and you're lumping them all into one group as if their cultures are identical. I might as well make all my judgments on country music based on Taylor Swift.

I can only guess as to how you would incorrectly define "rap speak", but to imply that it could have the same meaning as Ebonics is ridiculous and shows even more ignorance. You say they sound like idiots? Try telling that to Talib Kweli. Odds are, he's significantly more educated and accomplished than you (no offense--but for what it's worth, the odds say that he's probably more educated than the rest of us, too).

And speaking of Ebonics, how do you think people came to talk like that? Africans were brought over as slaves, barred from education, and then thrown into extremely dire conditions when slavery ended. Do you think all the other cultures in the world were speaking eloquently within a century or two of being introduced to education? How do you think the British feel about Americans and the ways we abuse English? Do we sound like idiots, too?

Reds/Flyers Fan
11-26-2012, 11:35 AM
I can't stand it when people put an "s" at the end of someone's name in some weird attempt to pluralize them.

Jim Bowden used to do this a lot when he was with the Reds, saying things like "If we can get the Griffeys and the Dunns healthy ..." Or "in our lineup, with the Kearnses, the Dunns, the Griffeys ..."

So annoying. Are there more than one of these people?

medford
11-26-2012, 12:32 PM
I can't stand it when people put an "s" at the end of someone's name in some weird attempt to pluralize them.

Jim Bowden used to do this a lot when he was with the Reds, saying things like "If we can get the Griffeys and the Dunns healthy ..." Or "in our lineup, with the Kearnses, the Dunns, the Griffeys ..."

So annoying. Are there more than one of these people?

Well at one point, in Seattle there was a time they wanted to get the "Griffeys" in the lineup. Heck, even here there was a time that Jim Bowden was correct when talking about having guys like the Boones and Larkins in the line up :D

traderumor
11-26-2012, 12:43 PM
It seems to me that you're showing a great deal of ignorance on the subject. There are literally dozens of different types of rap, and you're lumping them all into one group as if their cultures are identical. I might as well make all my judgments on country music based on Taylor Swift.

I can only guess as to how you would incorrectly define "rap speak", but to imply that it could have the same meaning as Ebonics is ridiculous and shows even more ignorance. You say they sound like idiots? Try telling that to Talib Kweli. Odds are, he's significantly more educated and accomplished than you (no offense--but for what it's worth, the odds say that he's probably more educated than the rest of us, too).

And speaking of Ebonics, how do you think people came to talk like that? Africans were brought over as slaves, barred from education, and then thrown into extremely dire conditions when slavery ended. Do you think all the other cultures in the world were speaking eloquently within a century or two of being introduced to education? How do you think the British feel about Americans and the ways we abuse English? Do we sound like idiots, too?Language is a funny thing. We can use perfect grammar, have great diction, sound very sophisticated, and still be an idiot. However, if communication with a listener is the goal, it is advisable to find some common ground. Just like the big word user needs to consider his audience, so does the user of dialects, whether it be street lingo, a thick Latino accent, hillbilly redneck, or someone from Massachussets.

camisadelgolf
11-26-2012, 05:29 PM
cinredsfan2000, please tell me whether you think I sound ignorant or not.

Uneducated black people whose descendants were dragged here by slave owners? Until their English sounds more like mine, they sound like idiots.

The indigenous peoples of the Americas? Until their English sounds more like mine, they sound like idiots.

Refugees in search of a safe haven and being invited here by the U.S. government? Until their English sounds more like mine, they sound like idiots.

Ravenlord
11-26-2012, 08:00 PM
Ebonics and Gullah are actual languages--they're corrupt forms of American English; which in of itself is an intentionally corrupted form of English.

they're no less legitimate than corrupt forms of Semitic languages (which Yiddish is one example) or Finn-Urgic (like Runesinging, which Tolkein based Elvish from), and so on and so forth.

Larry Schuler
11-27-2012, 01:11 AM
I knew this gang would jump down your throat for sharing your harmless opinion, cinreds. That's what Redszone has become. What I did not anticipate however is that the author of this post is not Sea Ray.

GAC
11-27-2012, 05:13 AM
Aramaic was a street language.

I'm from Ohia where I worsh my clothes on a rock back at the crick. ;)

OldRightHander
11-27-2012, 10:57 AM
Aramaic was a street language.


So Jesus spoke the looked down upon street slang infused version of Hebrew. He probably had a baggy robe as well.

Well, he did go around with a small gang of 12. Hmm...

SunDeck
11-29-2012, 06:05 PM
So Jesus spoke the looked down upon street slang infused version of Hebrew. He probably had a baggy robe as well.

Well, he did go around with a small gang of 12. Hmm...

That was an entourage.

Yo.

SunDeck
11-29-2012, 06:07 PM
Aramaic was a street language.

I'm from Ohia where I worsh my clothes on a rock back at the crick. ;)

Don't forget to flush the torlit.
If you don't,I'll take a pitcher of it.

gilpdawg
11-30-2012, 10:56 PM
Don't forget to flush the torlit.
If you don't,I'll take a pitcher of it.

I hate when people say "Bangals." It's Bengals dang it. And I don't even like the Bengals so I imagine actual fans get annoyed by that.

Sent from my Transformer TF101 using Tapatalk HD

SunDeck
12-01-2012, 09:44 AM
I hate when people say "Bangals." It's Bengals dang it. And I don't even like the Bengals so I imagine actual fans get annoyed by that.

Sent from my Transformer TF101 using Tapatalk HD

I read this on a Saturday morning, wishing I could have a plate of goetta and aggs. And a stick of sellry in my bloody mary.