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BUTLER REDSFAN
04-15-2009, 11:35 PM
I'm not commenting on Jackie Robinson the man. I'm talking about the MLB overkill. I think they are overdoing it. It seems as though there is a Jackie Robinson ceremony of some sort literally every week. We get it, MLB. Now move on.

redsfan1966
04-16-2009, 12:21 AM
I admire you for stating your opinion; in today's politically correct climate your comments could be taken the wrong way. But honestly I havent noticed a weekly Jackie Robinson tribute---you may be noticing the increase from the opening of the Mets' new park which has a Jackie Robinson rotunda. I dont have a problem with MLB taking April 15th to honor Mr. Robinson. Program sales probably were down for the day though with everyone wearing 42...:)

GIDP
04-16-2009, 12:24 AM
I feel that making everyone wear 42 cheapens the meaning of it a little.

Redlegs
04-16-2009, 06:11 AM
I agree completely with the thread starter. Jackie's accomplishments are many. His life exceeds the boundries of professional baseball. With that said, MLB's ceremonies are overdone.

reds1869
04-16-2009, 07:59 AM
MLB is definitely overdoing it. By constantly having some kind of remembrance they are cheapening his legacy, turning it into a PR opportunity for the leagues...the very same leagues that for so long sought to shut out minorities.

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 08:33 AM
Having 1 game a year to honor him is overdoing it?

Number_Fourteen
04-16-2009, 08:42 AM
Ditto with the poster. Totally cheapens it, and ridiculous to see all Dodger players and various other teams parading around wearing #42.

Of course I didn't know Jackie Robinson, but if he were still alive, I'd venture to guess he, himself, wouldn't be comfortable with all of this.

It's 2009, let's move on. I'm tired of it being rammed down our throats by MLB at every corner -- we get it already.

BTW, how did the Mets suddenly morph into the Brooklyn Dodgers? Yes, I understand the history, i.e. Wilpon was a Dodger fan, the Mets creation post-Brooklyn Dodgers, and so forth. It just seems bizarre the NY Mets dedicating a rotunda, essentially a center-piece of the park, in Robinson's name. Why not the Tom Seaver Rotunda? Seems a far better connection and tribute to the history of the Mets.

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 08:54 AM
Why is it ridiculous for everyoen to wear 42 for ONE game? I'm sure many casual or younger fans saw that and asked or looked up the reason why, and found out more about Jackie Robinson. How exactly is that a bad thing? How does changing the numbers on the back of their uniform change your game experience one iota?

Let's not underestimate the tremendous impact Robinson had, not only on baseball, but our nation. He was a symbol of something larger and went through hell to play the game. Call me crazy, but I think that deserves recognition.

Number_Fourteen
04-16-2009, 09:04 AM
Having 1 game a year to honor him is overdoing it?

IMO, yes. 10th, 25th, 50th and so on anniversaries, fine. But, every year? Totally unnecessary and very watered down. I'd venture to guess that accountants pointed out that this yearly remembrance creates just another handsome annual side profit for MLB.

Number_Fourteen
04-16-2009, 09:14 AM
Why is it ridiculous for everyoen to wear 42 for ONE game?

Overly contrived, perhaps? A sleeve patch, totally fine. But, EVERY player wearing the same number, and it's silliness. Aren't unique numbers sewn onto each MLB team uniform for a specific reason? Perhaps MLB would love to sell more #42 fan jerseys?


I'm sure many casual or younger fans saw that and asked or looked up the reason why, and found out more about Jackie Robinson. How exactly is that a bad thing?

Not a bad thing. But, do you really think such events are left uncovered in the school curriculum in 2009?


How does changing the numbers on the back of their uniform change your game experience one iota?

Do you keep score at games? Knowing MLB does this largely to sell jerseys, makes my $11 Dixie cup sized beer go down less smoothly.


Let's not underestimate the tremendous impact Robinson had, not only on baseball, but our nation. He was a symbol of something larger and went through hell to play the game. Call me crazy, but I think that deserves recognition.

Fully agree. We're basically squabbling over how much recognition is enough, at this point.

Bumstead
04-16-2009, 09:20 AM
It's one game a year and all those players that are wearing the number 42 made an individual choice to wear that number. They don't have to wear #42 if they do not want to. Today it is done; baseball is back to normal; I don't care for having to be PC all the time myself but I don't mind baseball 'celebrating' Jacque Robinson breaking the color barrier in baseball once a year either. Just my opinion.

Bum

bounty37h
04-16-2009, 09:40 AM
I see the point of the OP, I would take it a different route, why not celebrate more players who have made similar-even if not as dramatic-steps for baseball as well as society. Larry Doby, wasnt he the following season, and the first AL'er, why dont we give him some focus-to honor Robinson while expanding to others that faced challenges and overcame them. How bout the first Latino player? There were 2 brothers (real bro's, not the slang-cant recall names offhand) who played in the American Association in the 1800's, tell their story. There is a lot more then Jackie Robinson, not to diminsh what he did in any way, but lets expand if we are going to celebrate and honor. It is sort of like every city having a MLK rd/hwy/blvd, was he the only black that deserves recognition and made an impact for his people?

bounty37h
04-16-2009, 09:41 AM
It's one game a year and all those players that are wearing the number 42 made an individual choice to wear that number. They don't have to wear #42 if they do not want to. Today it is done; baseball is back to normal; I don't care for having to be PC all the time myself but I don't mind baseball 'celebrating' Jacque Robinson breaking the color barrier in baseball once a year either. Just my opinion.

Bum

Bum, they did require all players, all teams to wear it this year-it was an option in years past.

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 10:54 AM
I don't think anybody really pays attention to patches. Some do, but it would not make the same statement as the number on the back.

And no I wouldn't be surprised if school's left out Jackie Robinson from the curriculum. Besides, if someone is watching baseball they are probably a bigger fan of the game and may be interested in a more in depth look at the man.

Sometimes I do keep score at games, but they have announcements and scoreboards that give the names of the players on the field. I don't read their numbers and look up each player. Besides, don't they have the players normal numbers on the jersey front?

Baseball uniquely ties the history of the game to the present in a way unlike any other sport, IMO. This is another example of that. And I agree with bounty that recognizing other similar achievements would be welcome as well.

Bumstead
04-16-2009, 12:00 PM
Ah...I did not know that. Thanks for correcting that. It should not be a requirement to wear #42 if one chooses not to...still, it's one day.

bgwilly31
04-16-2009, 12:07 PM
It's one game a year and all those players that are wearing the number 42 made an individual choice to wear that number. They don't have to wear #42 if they do not want to.

Bum

hahaha really. >?

You cant be serious. Of course they HAVE to wear the number. If austin kearns and adam dunn didnt wear the number on the nationals. What kind of headlines do you think would have been ran about them. :laugh:

I was unaware this is now a national holiday in the baseball world.

I agree with what was said before. 10th 25th 50th anniversary fine.

But every year is definitely over kill.

bounty37h
04-16-2009, 12:39 PM
hahaha really. >?

You cant be serious. Of course they HAVE to wear the number. If austin kearns and adam dunn didnt wear the number on the nationals. What kind of headlines do you think would have been ran about them. :laugh:

I was unaware this is now a national holiday in the baseball world.

I agree with what was said before. 10th 25th 50th anniversary fine.

But every year is definitely over kill.

BG, this is the first year it was required of all players, the last few years has been optional, and the amount of players wearing overall was a minority, definetely, throughout the league-and noone said anything negative about any player that didn't choose to wear it then from what I ever saw or read.

bgwilly31
04-16-2009, 01:13 PM
oh i thought this was the first year. Well im assuming this is the first year EVERYONE wore the number.

In this years case. My fact would hold true.

Ghosts of 1990
04-16-2009, 01:35 PM
Got real sick of seeing the #42 jerseys FWIW. I think if you are african american you should wear the #42 on Jackie Robinson day. or if you choose to. It is overkill to see everyone in the number IMO.

bgwilly31
04-16-2009, 01:43 PM
i dont mind the celebration at all. But every year is just over the top. And will get old fast.

tommycash
04-16-2009, 01:44 PM
I love the Jackie Robinson story. He was a great player and broke down barriers. But why does the MLB think they have to honor him every year. At least they could honor other great barrier breaking players. Why not have a Roberto Clemente day, or Satchel Paige day. MLB does this to do 2 things every year. 1. to promote the MLB as a equal opportunity league. 2. to use Jackie Robinson to make money years after his death. How many different uniforms can they now sell with the #42 on it? How many tv stations will be giving out free publicity for the MLB reporting on Jackie Robinson day at the local ball park? Jackie Robinson was a legend, but now he is a corporate logo used and abused by MLB. I say use Jackie, but don't forget to honor all of the other greats that overcame a lot in their lives to play baseball as well.

reds1869
04-16-2009, 01:54 PM
I think a better solution would be tying this into the Civil Rights Weekend. I understand the anniversary and all, but I also think it comes off as very contrived. Were it part of a bigger celebration--which also included pioneers like Larry Doby and members of other minority groups--I don't think anyone would be quite as put off.

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 02:56 PM
Got real sick of seeing the #42 jerseys FWIW. I think if you are african american you should wear the #42 on Jackie Robinson day. or if you choose to. It is overkill to see everyone in the number IMO.

Wow.....just wow.

tommycash
04-16-2009, 03:07 PM
I think a better solution would be tying this into the Civil Rights Weekend. I understand the anniversary and all, but I also think it comes off as very contrived. Were it part of a bigger celebration--which also included pioneers like Larry Doby and members of other minority groups--I don't think anyone would be quite as put off.

I agree. When do we get a Larry Doby, or Buck Leonard day. There were too many men who help break that barrier, and to honor just one is really a travesty.

Mutaman
04-16-2009, 05:08 PM
Considering the fact that up until 60 years ago a guy couldn't play major league baseball ( or ride in the front of a bus) because of his skin color , I don't think setting aside one day a year to honor the guy who put an end to that nonsence is too much to ask. And for all you white folks out there who can't handle one day of "political correctnesss" , well just take one for the team.

DannyB
04-16-2009, 05:16 PM
Once per year is ok with me,as long as the reason is to honor Mr.Robinson and not to be PC. As far as that goes shouldnt MLB also be honoring the guy that signed him?

Mutaman
04-16-2009, 05:21 PM
Once per year is ok with me,as long as the reason is to honor Mr.Robinson and not to be PC. As far as that goes shouldnt MLB also be honoring the guy that signed him?

But we are honoring that guy. When we honor #42, we pay respect to Larry Doby and Branch Rickey and Pee Wee Reese and everybody who said "enough of this BS, anybody can move to the front of the bus". Yesterday was for all of them.

redsfanmia
04-17-2009, 06:45 PM
Everyone does realize just how significant the achievements of Jack Roosevelt Robinson were right? I think one day a year is not enough to honor this great man.

flash
04-17-2009, 07:09 PM
It is overkill

If Rickey hadn't signed him, the Mexican league would have and a lot of other black players. they were trying to sign a lot of ballplayers after the war.

Compare this overkill to Marge Schott overkill. Probably wasn't a racist bone in her body, but she loved verbal give and take after a few beers. Her husband brought home a few war trophies so suddenly she is a Nazi for keeping them. Sexist Baseball got rid of her because she was a woman in a man's game. I believe she is the only woman in baseabll to have had a world series championship. No woman ever stands up for her though.

The funniest thing of all. The week after she is canned by MLB the new GM cans the black manager. Oops, can't say that because even though Perez was black his first language was Spanish which means he can't be in that race club. PC is just an acronym for Phony Clique.

AQnd another point illustrating the sexism in Baseball
When MLB issued the ballots for the Greatest Hispanic team they left off the greatest Hispanic player of all time, Ted Williams. Why? becuase his mother was a Mexican national from Tijuana. but as we all know women don't count in baseball.

reds1869
04-17-2009, 08:58 PM
Everyone does realize just how significant the achievements of Jack Roosevelt Robinson were right? I think one day a year is not enough to honor this great man.

Yes, and I also realize how important Larry Doby was. And all of those unnamed individuals who showed quiet courage in the face of horrible racism and never got the credit Jackie did. And how important Don Wakamatsu is to Asian-Americans. What Roberto Clemente did for the acceptance of Latin ballplayers. There are many who have made contributions to the breaking down of barriers and they should all be appreciated.

Was Jackie special? Certainly. But the rush to canonize him in the name of political correctness while downplaying the contributions of others is what really bothers me.

steig
04-18-2009, 09:28 AM
I'm tired of the yearly ceremony for Robinson. By all historical accounts he was a great man, leader, and ballplayer. However, having every player wear 42 and the yearly ceremony makes me feel like baseball is trying to shove this down my throat. I found myself actually growing tired of hearing about Robinson this year. I've thought that this has been overkill since MLB retired his number from all of baseball. He should be recognized but only on major anniversaries, not each year. And retiring the number of a player should be done for on the field performance. So in my opinion the only players who would qualify to have there numbers retired by all of baseball are Ruth and Aaron.

PickOff
04-18-2009, 10:54 AM
Bigotry is alive and well and southwest Ohio is far from an oasis. A yearly reminder of our nation's history and the civil rights struggle as it relates to America's game is not overkill. There are many people, myself included, that should reflect on racism past and present in our society and assess the continued effects of segregation and slavery - however many years past in our history. Baseball is a great vehicle for this and it is Jackie Robinson's life and acheivements that are best remembered in this regard.

Eric_the_Red
04-18-2009, 01:54 PM
Well said, PickOff.

bounty37h
04-21-2009, 12:09 PM
It is overkill

If Rickey hadn't signed him, the Mexican league would have and a lot of other black players. they were trying to sign a lot of ballplayers after the war.

Compare this overkill to Marge Schott overkill. Probably wasn't a racist bone in her body, but she loved verbal give and take after a few beers. Her husband brought home a few war trophies so suddenly she is a Nazi for keeping them. Sexist Baseball got rid of her because she was a woman in a man's game. I believe she is the only woman in baseabll to have had a world series championship. No woman ever stands up for her though.

The funniest thing of all. The week after she is canned by MLB the new GM cans the black manager. Oops, can't say that because even though Perez was black his first language was Spanish which means he can't be in that race club. PC is just an acronym for Phony Clique.

AQnd another point illustrating the sexism in Baseball
When MLB issued the ballots for the Greatest Hispanic team they left off the greatest Hispanic player of all time, Ted Williams. Why? becuase his mother was a Mexican national from Tijuana. but as we all know women don't count in baseball.

So you dont think calling Eric Davis her "million dollar monkey" was racist?

redsfanmia
04-22-2009, 08:37 AM
So you dont think calling Eric Davis her "million dollar monkey" was racist?

I am pretty sure it was worse than monkey. She called ED and Dave Parker her million dollar N bombs.

bounty37h
04-22-2009, 12:27 PM
Oh, wow, I heard her say monkey once after the 90 series when ED was in the hospital, but guess I wouldnt be surprised at anything that came out of her mouth.

RedEyez
04-23-2009, 05:31 PM
really!? geeez some people..

flash
04-23-2009, 06:12 PM
No, I don't think she was racist. She had a loud mouth and she would throw around words carelessy like a child on a playground, but I don't think she hated people on the basis of their skin color. She also hired Tony Perez, and was a big time philantrophist. I do believe that she was disliked because she didn't act like a lady, but then again I don't think she cared what people thought of her.

Eric_the_Red
04-23-2009, 07:13 PM
No, I don't think she was racist. She had a loud mouth and she would throw around words carelessy like a child on a playground, but I don't think she hated people on the basis of their skin color. She also hired Tony Perez, and was a big time philantrophist. I do believe that she was disliked because she didn't act like a lady, but then again I don't think she cared what people thought of her.

Especially the dark skinned people.

;)

Using certain words (like the n-word) is not "careless", it is racist.