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View Full Version : John Madden retires....



Puffy
04-16-2009, 11:26 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=4073253

UKFlounder
04-16-2009, 11:32 AM
Good.

I really enjoyed him as a broadcaster, especially a decade or more ago, but this seems like a good move for him.

Best wishes to him.

reds1869
04-16-2009, 11:36 AM
Best wishes to a legend. I've never been a fan of him or of--here comes some blasphemy--his video game, but I respect what he has done for the game of football.

WVRed
04-16-2009, 11:44 AM
Who is John Maddan?;)

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 11:49 AM
Good for him.

Hopefully this means we won't have to hear Frank Caliendo anymore as well.

SunDeck
04-16-2009, 12:37 PM
I know people don't like Madden, but I love the guy. He brought the same enthusiasm for the game that Don Meredith brought with MNF, except that he also had a coach's perspective on the importance of the trenches in ways that others had not. His interest in the technical aspects of line play taught me a lot about how to watch the game.

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 02:53 PM
Chris Collinsworth will be replacing Madden in the booth.

MrCinatit
04-16-2009, 03:10 PM
I love Madden. He loved the game and he loved talking about it.
Yeah, it has been a bit painful listening to him the last couple of years. And he without Pat simply was not right, no matter who he was paired with.

*BaseClogger*
04-16-2009, 03:19 PM
At least Madden's bumbling was funny. Now I have to deal with Chris Collinsworth? Ugh...

Hoosier Red
04-16-2009, 03:46 PM
Chris Collinsworth will be replacing Madden in the booth.

Official? I'm surprised NBC announced it so soon.
Fine by me, I like Collinsworth, though since I only watch Bengals games pretty much it probably wouldn't matter since I won't see the NBC game anyway.

Eric_the_Red
04-16-2009, 04:29 PM
Official? I'm surprised NBC announced it so soon.
Fine by me, I like Collinsworth, though since I only watch Bengals games pretty much it probably wouldn't matter since I won't see the NBC game anyway.


yes, officially.

Madden was on Sunday Nights. The Bengals have no prime time games, so you should be able to watch both.

paintmered
04-16-2009, 06:24 PM
Here's a guy that quits his job when he retires.

Unassisted
04-16-2009, 08:38 PM
I heard some speculation on the radio that Madden may have been prompted to do this by the death of Harry Kalas. Kalas was 73 and that just happens to be Madden's age.

RichRed
04-17-2009, 10:42 AM
Well, Madden kind of didn't really have a choice, what with Brett Favre retiring and all.

I'll miss Madden since his has been the voice of big games for just about my entire football-watching life.

cumberlandreds
04-17-2009, 11:24 AM
Madden,IMO, was the voice of the NFL for the last 25 years. When he teamed up with Pat Summerall there was no broadcast team better. He probably wasn't as good his last few years but he was still refreshing to hear. What gets lost about him was that he was a great coach. He had some really great teams at Oakland. He often just couldn't get past those great Steeler teams or he would have had a couple of more Super Bowl wins.
Brent Musberger was on ESPN radio this morning and he thinks Madden will be a consultant with either the Raiders or 49er's. He said Madden was still very close to Al Davis so he may be with them.

WVRed
04-17-2009, 12:23 PM
Well, Madden kind of didn't really have a choice, what with Brett Favre retiring and all.

I'll miss Madden since his has been the voice of big games for just about my entire football-watching life.

Ahem

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk_3Ji-4690

Edskin
04-17-2009, 12:30 PM
www.edkleese.blogspot.com

www.edkleese.blogspot.com

Only children do some interesting things. Some may think it’s weird, but for those of us out there who grew up sibling-less, these weird behaviors were borne out of necessity.

Only children who grow up obsessed with the NFL do some even more interesting things. As a child my “weird behavior” list was pretty long, but at the very top of that list had to be the imaginary NFL games I would play all by myself. I would catch, tackle, fumble, pass, kick, gouge, announce, rejoice, argue, and wallow in the mud all in the same series of motions and movements. I especially enjoyed the wallowing—just ask my Mom.

The behavior itself was pretty strange, but I think the motivation behind the behavior may have been even stranger. Most of the time, I would engage in these “games” in or near our front yard. But on occasion, when I was feeling a bit more “dangerous,” I would head to the front entrance of our neighborhood at 87th and Harvard in Tulsa, OK. The entrance area would get especially muddy, but more importantly, there was traffic coming and going. And traffic meant an audience. I was happy to “perform” for anyone who happened to be walking or driving by—but I was always hoping for one person in particular to catch my act.

At this point in my life, I am certified sports nut. I can trace my love of Major League Baseball, the NBA, and the two major college sports to specific times in my childhood. But with the NFL, there is no trace. It is as if it was written into my DNA. I do not possess a memory of time when I did not love the sport. For as long as I can remember, I was mesmerized by the helmets, uniforms, history, and drama of the NFL. I still get chills when I hear the original Monday Night Football theme song.

And then there was Madden. How could a kid not fall in love with THAT guy? John Madden oozed passion from the announcing booth. When I would see him on TV going nuts over the minutia of the game, I would get so excited because it made me feel like less of a freak. Here was this successful grown-up getting just as giddy about a mud-covered helmet as I was. If he could get away with it, then so could I.

He and his original partner, Pat Summerall, were as instrumental in the development of my love of the game as anyone. As a Redskins fan, I knew if Madden and Summerall were in the booth, that meant it was a big game. From a tactical standpoint, Madden helped me understand the importance of winning the game in trenches. He was the only analyst that was able to tell you exactly what the right guard did on the play almost before it was over. He saw things away from the ball—he helped teach me the game.

While his tactical prowess was always underrated, Madden will fittingly always be remembered for his passion, humor, and unique view of the game. Summerall was the straight-man and Madden delivered the punch lines—but never at the expense of the game (unlike many of the analysts today). His timing was impeccable, he always knew when to focus on the game, divert attention to the kid with the ice cream splattered on his face in the stands, or wax poetic about the “finality” of a team that was about to lose in the playoffs. In his prime, he was perfect.

As he got older, he slipped a bit, as we all do. He became a bit fixated on certain players and teams (Brett Favre), and he wasn’t quite as sharp as he was in heyday. But Madden always brought the passion—and that was good enough for me.

Madden goes down as an icon. But as a kid, I simply viewed him as an older version of myself.

Back to that muddy neighborhood entrance…

By that time, I knew Madden was afraid to fly and I knew he traveled from city to city via his RV—the famous Madden Cruiser.

Even though I knew it was a long shot, I was convinced that if Madden happened to drive by and see me re-enacting Redskins-Cowboys doused in mud and sweat that he’d stop and say hello—or maybe even invite me aboard to join him en route to his next destination.

Of course, the Cruiser never came. But that doesn’t mean that Madden didn’t take me for a ride.

Hoosier Red
04-17-2009, 12:45 PM
yes, officially.

Madden was on Sunday Nights. The Bengals have no prime time games, so you should be able to watch both.

Oh I know I can, I just don't follow many games if the Bengals aren't playing.
After following UC football from 1984-1996, IU football since 1996 and the Bengals for my whole life, I like to say I'm averse to watching good football.

improbus
04-19-2009, 05:11 PM
So many announcers often feel that they are bigger than the game. Madden was never that way.

goreds2
04-20-2009, 04:13 AM
BOOM !

(Someone had to say it. ;) )

DTCromer
04-20-2009, 07:06 AM
Is Madden so popular because he had the Harray Carey disease? He sounded so stupid that everyone loved him?

Personally, I thought Summerall was the better part of the team. Listening to the Madden the last 5-10 years was like nails on a chalkboard.

Chip R
04-20-2009, 02:56 PM
Is Madden so popular because he had the Harray Carey disease? He sounded so stupid that everyone loved him?


I don't think that was it at all. Madden was a former coach who could communicate what was going on out on the field without talking down to the audience. He also had a great personality and people just loved him.


Personally, I thought Summerall was the better part of the team. Listening to the Madden the last 5-10 years was like nails on a chalkboard.


Summerall was an excellent play by play guy. I believe Madden has credited much of his success to him. But they had different roles so I think it's unfair to compare them. I agree that Madden had slipped over the past several years.