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cincrazy
05-07-2009, 09:06 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=4150536

Bob Melvin will be fired as manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks, the Arizona Republic reported Thursday.

It's unclear if the Diamondbacks have fired Melvin or if they are waiting until the team returns home from San Diego, but Melvin will lose his job before the end of the day Thursday, multiple sources told the Republic.

The Diamondbacks fell to 12-17 this season after losing to the San Diego Padres 4-3 in 10 innings on Thursday.

hebroncougar
05-07-2009, 09:12 PM
Funny..........I was about to post a poll as to who would be the first manager fired......

Team Clark
05-07-2009, 10:18 PM
No way would I can Melvin. I can not pin point a whole lot that would make me blame him. I know it's the nature of the beast but geeeez. 1st week of May and 5 games under .500 in the weakest division in Baseball.

VR
05-07-2009, 10:25 PM
I was in Phoenix the last few days.....talk radio was tearing him UP yesterday.

TheNext44
05-08-2009, 12:11 AM
Jon Heyman reports that A.J. Hinch, will be named manager Friday.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/baseball/mlb/05/07/diamondbacks.manager/index.html

fearofpopvol1
05-08-2009, 12:32 AM
Let's can Dusty and bring in Melvin.

Tom Servo
05-08-2009, 12:53 AM
Jon Heyman reports that A.J. Hinch, will be named manager Friday.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/baseball/mlb/05/07/diamondbacks.manager/index.html
Glad to hear it. Hinch seems very baseball savy.

redsfandan
05-08-2009, 01:00 AM
As long as Justin Upton doesn't hit 7th or 8th anymore I'll be happy.

WVRedsFan
05-08-2009, 01:28 AM
And we thought Bobby Cast had an itchy trigger finger.

They come and they go.

bucksfan2
05-08-2009, 08:48 AM
And we thought Bobby Cast had an itchy trigger finger.

They come and they go.

Arizona is one of the hardest hit places in this recession. The DBacks seem to always have financial issues and Im sure the owners are getting a little itchy as to how much money they will lose this season.

westofyou
05-09-2009, 11:32 AM
http://www.azcentral.com/sports/diamondbacks/articles/2009/05/08/20090508bickley0509.html


Josh Byrnes is a visionary. Or he's a classic meddler consumed with regaining his wonder-boy status.

Either way, it's his neck on the line now.

The Diamondbacks general manager just fired a consummate professional and deep thinker, replacing him with a man who has never coached or managed on any level. And this is progress?

Bob Melvin is gone. A.J. Hinch is the new boss, inexplicably signed through 2012. For the second time in their brief history, the Diamondbacks are acting as if they're smarter than everyone else in baseball.

They acted this way under the little dictator, Buck Showalter. They're acting that way now. During the news conference, Byrnes dropped phrases like "organizational advocacy" and "collaboration" and how Hinch had a "greater understanding of standards and concepts." He talked so far above the room that he might as well have been standing on Pluto. It's unbecoming, and this stuff makes other teams extremely motivated.

"(Hinch) has never done a double switch," Byrnes said. "But he knows what it looks like. He'll figure it out."

You can convince me that this team needed a new voice, a new leader. Many fans in the Valley are extremely disgusted with this group and envisioned a new manager who would flip tables, throw coolers and light a fire under listless players struggling to hit their own weights. They would have gladly embraced a Mark Grace, a Kirk Gibson, and maybe even the volatile Chip Hale.

"Why so unconventional? Why did we choose A.J.?" Byrnes said. "I'm very happy to answer that."

Byrnes went on to paint Hinch as a great untapped leader who can connect the organization "from top to bottom." He intimated that Melvin had created a bad vibe, a negative energy in the room that exacerbated the failure. That's very possible, and possibly very insightful. But the solution is bizarre.

After the news conference concluded, managing general partner Ken Kendrick engaged in heated exchanges with skeptical members of the media. It was beyond comical. At one point, Kendrick asked why he should follow conventional wisdom and hire from the traditional talent pool when that pool is full of losers who had failed in the past.

It's a good point. Of course, that doesn't explain why he once hired Melvin, who was fired in Seattle. And nobody had a good answer how a manager with no experience can turn a fragile team around, or why they didn't just place the interim tag on Hinch and see how he performed.

"I understand the enormity of the job," Hinch said. "I have a lot to learn."

Inside the clubhouse, many players are scratching their heads. They know Hinch is Byrnes' right-hand man. They are free to wonder whether the new manager expedited the departure of their ex-manager. They might wonder what the new manager is telling the general manager on a daily basis, realizing now that no secrets are safe.

They also know that Melvin's daily lineup was beginning to have Byrnes' fingerprints all over it, a fact that Byrnes did not dispute or apologize for before Friday's game. That dynamic grated on Melvin, but it will assuredly continue under the Hinch reign.

"At game time, the manager is the manager, there's no question about that," Byrnes said.

To the paying customers, the selection of Hinch only adds to the Diamondbacks' credibility problems. This organization has some strange ideas, from embarrassing in-game entertainment to a broadcast that's often sophomoric and self-serving. The best coach in the organization, Bryan Price, just quit out of respect for Melvin. It's a long way from 2007, when the Diamondbacks were considered the model franchise in Major League Baseball.

But don't feel sorry for Melvin. He's the big winner here. This early termination turned him into a martyr and a scapegoat, and his popularity is higher today than it has been in over a year.

As for Byrnes, he better hope this unusual maneuver turns into an inside-the-park home run. After all, the general manager's batting average is plummeting, just like some of his prized player

traderumor
05-09-2009, 12:12 PM
It's a long way from 2007, when the Diamondbacks were considered the model franchise in Major League Baseball.So were the Indians. I think tooty fruity has a longer shelf life than baseball "model franchises."

Team Clark
05-09-2009, 12:17 PM
So were the Indians. I think tooty fruity has a longer shelf life than baseball "model franchises."

At least the Red Sox have taken the ball and run with it. Along with the cash and coal necessary to keep that train running!

traderumor
05-09-2009, 12:24 PM
At least the Red Sox have taken the ball and run with it. Along with the cash and coal necessary to keep that train running!It seems at times that good runs by franchises will go on forever, doesn't it? The fans start to think their team is immortal, then the crucibles of "parity" rules will be developed or reinstituted, unfortunate providential events, and good old human pride will topple the latest "dynasty" yet again.

westofyou
05-09-2009, 02:58 PM
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/story/138975

Fancy words don't explain D-Backs' odd move
By Scott Bordow
Tribune


Here are some of the phrases Diamondbacks general manager Josh Byrnes used to explain his hiring of front office executive A.J. Hinch as the team’s new manager:

“Standards and concepts.”

“Multiple paths to success.”

“Belief precedes performance.”

And my personal favorite: “The lack of experience is overwhelmed by understanding what organizational advocacy is.”

Wait a minute. When did we stumble into a Dilbert comic strip?

I can’t decide whether Byrnes sounded like he had lost his mind Friday or if he’s just that much smarter than the rest of us.

For now, though, I’m convinced the Diamondbacks are the laughingstock of baseball for hiring a manager who has no coaching experience on any level and then signing him through the 2012 season.

“I’m not afraid of taking a risk,” managing general partner Ken Kendrick said.

This isn’t a risk. The Diamondbacks have jumped the shark.

Here’s what Byrnes did the last 48 hours: He fired Bob Melvin on Wednesday then asked him to manage the next two games in San Diego. Classy move there. And what does it say about Melvin that he agreed to stay on?

Then Byrnes replaces Melvin with Hinch, and even though no one in the organization has any clue if Hinch knows what he’s doing inside a dugout, they give him a long-term contract.

“There’s a piece of experience he doesn’t have. He’s going to have to learn on the job,” Byrnes said

Uh, shouldn’t that be done in Class A ball rather than the major leagues?

I listened to Byrnes intently Friday, and I still don’t understand his rationale for hiring Hinch. The best I can figure it, Byrnes thinks Hinch will be more effective than Melvin in reaching the Diamondbacks’ players because he believed in them as they climbed through the minor league system.

Never mind the fact that former hitting coach Rick Schu was in the organization since 1998. I guess he wasn’t encouraging enough.

“They might not feel A.J.’s experience, but they’ll feel that advocacy,” Byrnes said.

And Melvin wasn’t an advocate?

“It’s not sort of taking bullets and saying the right things publicly,” Byrnes said. “There are actions, there’s a vibe, ‘Hey, you’re going to get this done.’ There are managers we admire that sort of give the vibe this is going to work because I think it’s going to work.

“I think (the vibe) was missing. I don’t think we gave off the vibe that this will work.”

Or was it because Melvin and Byrnes disagreed on who should play, and the manager thought the GM shouldn’t be making out the lineup card?

Look, I won’t argue that the team was in a funk, and firing Melvin – even though he didn’t deserve to be canned – was about the only course the Diamondbacks had.

But this idea that “organizational advocacy” will help Chris Young lay off an outside slider or Mark Reynolds cut down on his strikeouts is ludicrous. Belief doesn’t hit a 95 mph fastball. Neither do fancy words.

I’ll say this for Hinch: He came across well Friday. He was intelligent and articulate, and as a former catcher he clearly knows the game, having played parts of seven major league seasons.

But he’s walking into a buzz saw. The players had great respect for Melvin, and it was telling that when reporters were allowed in the clubhouse at 5 p.m., they scattered like ants. Clearly, they didn’t want to say the wrong thing and appear to be critical of the front office.

As for Byrnes, he’s lost his safety net. No longer can Melvin, Schu or any of the other coaches be blamed for the players not doing their job. If Hinch can’t turn this team around with the help of all that “organizational advocacy,” Byrnes should be the next to go.

But, hey, Byrnes and Hinch really, really believe in these players, so everything will be OK.

Team Clark
05-09-2009, 03:06 PM
It seems at times that good runs by franchises will go on forever, doesn't it? The fans start to think their team is immortal, then the crucibles of "parity" rules will be developed or reinstituted, unfortunate providential events, and good old human pride will topple the latest "dynasty" yet again.

Agreed. At some point, next year or 5 years from now the farm system and the risk of free agents will catch up to them. In the mean time no one from Boston is complaining.

cincrazy
05-09-2009, 03:28 PM
Agreed. At some point, next year or 5 years from now the farm system and the risk of free agents will catch up to them. In the mean time no one from Boston is complaining.

Well Boston has done a better job than New York with the farm system. I think it's really going to blow up in the Yankees face. The Red Sox are still producing the likes of Ellsbury, Lester, Bucholz and many other names that aren't in the majors yet, and I think the Sox are going to have a long reign atop that division barring injuries or bad luck.

traderumor
05-09-2009, 04:48 PM
Beware someone who feels the need to speak their own language, as it is normally a cover for incompetence that one is attempting to veneer with phraseology, thinking that the hearers are ignorant to their devices.

Or..."pay no attention to that man behind the curtain."

redsmetz
05-12-2009, 06:07 AM
I wasn't familiar with the Diamondback's GM, but Byrnes makes Jim Bowden seem like a genius.