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cincrazy
05-20-2009, 08:07 PM
http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/story/11768946


FOUNTAIN HILLS, Ariz. -- The wife of Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Scott Schoeneweis has been found dead at her home.

Police say the cause of death hasn't been determined.

The Maricopa County Sheriff's Office says deputies found the body of 39-year-old Gabrielle Dawn Schoeneweis on the floor of the master bedroom in the family's suburban home shortly after noon Wednesday.

Authorities say her 14-year-old daughter called the sheriff's office to report that she had found her mother lying there and unresponsive.



Thoughts and prayers to that family, that's horrible.

Joseph
05-20-2009, 09:21 PM
Terrible news indeed.

Eric_the_Red
05-20-2009, 09:31 PM
Geez, how awful. And for the daughter to find her...

WVPacman
05-20-2009, 11:42 PM
Thoughts and prayers go out to the family and exspecially that little girl.

Mario-Rijo
05-21-2009, 02:01 AM
I'm not even gonna say it.

Thoughts and prayers out to those family members.

LvJ
05-21-2009, 02:31 AM
Ugggh, that's horrible.

Topcat
05-21-2009, 02:57 AM
Awful news and prayers to Scott and his daughter and there extended family.

HeatherC1212
05-21-2009, 08:54 AM
Oh wow, that is so sad. My thoughts and prayers go out to Scott and his family. :(

tommycash
05-21-2009, 08:56 AM
My deepest sympathies to Scott and his family at this terrible time.

nate
05-21-2009, 09:13 AM
Horrible news!

savafan
07-23-2009, 07:36 PM
http://www.azcentral.com/sports/diamondbacks/articles/2009/07/18/20090718deathsuit0718-CP.html

by Ofelia Madrid - Jul. 18, 2009 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic

Scott Schoeneweis, the Diamondbacks relief pitcher whose wife died unexpectedly in May, is asking the courts to keep the cause of her death secret.

Thomas Lawless, Schoeneweis' lawyer, asked a Maricopa County Superior Court judge on July 9 to seal the death records, arguing that Gabrielle Dawn Schoeneweis' May 20 death "caused massive publicity that distressed Scott and traumatized their four children - ages 14, 7, 5 and 2."

"The release of her death certificate and related documents will inflame the media once again and cause even more emotional turmoil and suffering for her family," Lawless argued.

Schoeneweis' request was denied the same day by Superior Court Judge Barbara Hamner.

Hamner acknowledged the family's desire for privacy and said the court was sympathetic to the concerns, but she noted in her written order that "personal concerns do not constitute grounds to seal or redact public documents."

Schoeneweis immediately filed a special action in the Arizona Court of Appeals challenging the decision. The appellate court ordered Thursday that no information regarding Gabrielle Schoeneweis' death be released pending consideration of the matter.

Dan Barr, an attorney for the Arizona First Amendment Coalition, agreed with the Superior Court ruling. Public-records law is not based on whether people become upset when information is released, he said.

"I'm sure that Scott Schoeneweis is shattered by his wife's death and having it publicly discussed. I have no doubt about that," Barr said. "But that's not a reason to withhold public documents."

Lawless did not return a phone call seeking comment.

On May 20, Maricopa County Sheriff's deputies arrived to find Gabrielle Schoeneweis, 38, unresponsive in the family's Fountain Hills home.

Schoeneweis was pronounced dead at the scene. The couple's 14-year-old daughter told sheriff's deputies she found her mother on the home's master-bedroom floor, officials said.

At the time, a Sheriff's Office spokesman said there were no signs of foul play.

Reds1
07-23-2009, 08:52 PM
That's my age! That's terrible news for anyone.

Team Clark
07-23-2009, 10:49 PM
Reminds me of Dale Earnhardt's death. No autopsy photos were released. I realize this is a little different. Just made me think of that.

M2
07-23-2009, 10:56 PM
Thomas Lawless, Schoeneweis' lawyer

That can't be the same Tom Lawless the Reds once traded heads up for Pete Rose, can it?

BCubb2003
07-23-2009, 11:11 PM
That can't be the same Tom Lawless the Reds once traded heads up for Pete Rose, can it?

That Tom Lawless is managing the Lexington Legends.

Mainspark
07-24-2009, 01:38 AM
While I have nothing but sympathy for Schoeneweis and his family, I think he's made a mistake if he was hoping to minimize the scrutiny of his wife's passing.
Now matter how odd or disturbing the cause of death here (if it even qualifies as such), I can't imagine the routine release of such information would have resulted in more than a one-day news story, primarily in the Phoenix area.
His pursuit of keeping that information from the public is going only to increase, significantly, the amount of attention her death, and the cause of death, receives from the public and the media.

Unassisted
07-24-2009, 11:04 AM
Now matter how odd or disturbing the cause of death here (if it even qualifies as such), I can't imagine the routine release of such information would have resulted in more than a one-day news story, primarily in the Phoenix area.
Even if it was the same cause of death that ended the lives of David Carradine and Michael Hutchence? Not saying that it is, but that's an example of a cause that would be understandable to keep private.

Dan
07-24-2009, 11:17 AM
While I have nothing but sympathy for Schoeneweis and his family, I think he's made a mistake if he was hoping to minimize the scrutiny of his wife's passing.

He lost his wife of many years, suddenly and entirely unexpectedly. You can't expect someone to react with straight thinking after that. Maybe he made a mistake, but he's a human with strong emotions, just like all of us, and deserves the time to work through the grief. If sealing the records allows him to feel a bit more in control of the situation then who is any of us to say it's right or wrong?

KoryMac5
07-24-2009, 11:22 AM
I think he is doing this simply to protect his children. Can't say I blame him for trying to act with their best interests in mind.

Bob Borkowski
12-02-2009, 10:30 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/print?id=4703661&type=story

Arizona court releases cause of death

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Associated Press

PHOENIX -- Former Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Scott Schoeneweis' wife died from an overdose of cocaine and an anesthetic, lidocaine, an appellate court disclosed in a ruling released Tuesday.

The ruling also said an investigation revealed evidence that Gabrielle Schoeneweis' cocaine use "may have caused harm to another person." That person was not identified.

Gabrielle Schoeneweis was found dead on May 20 in the master bedroom of the couple's home in Fountain Hills, a Phoenix suburb.

A three-judge Court of Appeals panel disclosed the cause of death in a ruling on whether an autopsy report and other records on Gabrielle Schoeneweis' death must be disclosed under Arizona's public records law.

The Court of Appeals panel said further proceedings are needed to determine that based on public interest in any investigation into criminal conduct.

But the panel said its ruling disclosed the cause of death to provide guidance "in this and other cases" and because cause of death is a central fact not subject to consideration of whether privacy rights outweigh public interest for disclosure of public records.

An attorney for Schoeneweis argued in a lawsuit filed against state and Maricopa County officials that release of information on the cause of death would cause emotional suffering for the family.

The Court of Appeals panel's ruling came on Schoeneweis' appeal of a July 9 ruling in which a trial judge denied Schoeneweis' request to seal the death certificate and any other documents concerning the cause of death.

The Court of Appeals temporarily barred release of the documents while it considered Schoeneweis' appeal.

Mark Dangerfield, the attorney representing Schoeneweis in the appeal, said it was disappointing that the ruling disclosed the cause of death. He declined to comment further.

Authorities said Gabrielle Schoeneweis' 14-year-old daughter called the sheriff's office to report that she had found her mother lying on the floor and unresponsive.

Schoeneweis and his wife celebrated their 10th anniversary in January. They had three children together, and she already had a daughter when they were married.

Schoeneweis, a left-handed relief pitcher, spent three weeks on the bereavement list after his wife's death before returning to play on June 9. He gave up 15 earned runs in nine innings when he came back and was placed on the disabled list Aug. 11 because of depression. He returned to the team on Sept. 7.

He had signed a one-year contract with Arizona for 2009 and is now a free agent.


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camisadelgolf
12-02-2009, 11:54 AM
Many lives have been ruined by cocaine use. If you know someone who is using, try to find help for the person. Addiction is a disease.