PDA

View Full Version : Votto won't be ready when he comes off DL



Redlegs
06-07-2009, 10:40 AM
According to CBSportsline, Joey Votto is dealing with a personal issue that he has asked the Reds to keep private. The website also said he would not be ready to play when he returns from the DL. Perhaps a rehab assignment is in order.

Anyone starting to worry more than just a little bit?

Redlegs
06-07-2009, 10:42 AM
From CBSportsline:

News: Reds 1B Joey Votto, who's on the DL because of "stress-related issues," won't be ready to return when eligible June 14, according to MLB.com. "Probably not," said manager Dusty Baker. "We're not there yet." Votto is dealing with a personal issue that he's asked the Reds to keep private, but he showed up to the ballpark in street clothes Friday. "He hasn't hit in a while," Baker said. "He's a natural, but he's not that natural. There's no indication on when he'll be doing any baseball activity. I wish I had more to tell you, but I don't."

Chip R
06-07-2009, 10:47 AM
I think when he does do a rehab, he should do it in Dayton. They have such problems getting people to go to games up there so it may be a nice attendance jump for them. ;)

Redlegs
06-07-2009, 10:49 AM
This stress thing just has me wondering what's going on and how big the problem is. When he isn't feeling dizzy, he hasn't missed a beat yet it's troublesome enough for him to shut it down. I just hope he can deal with whatever he's going through and this thing don't become bigger than it already is.

Strikes Out Looking
06-07-2009, 10:51 AM
Does this mean he is going to go to rehab on June 14 or that he isn't ready and when he is at a later date, he'll go to rehab.

I would say something else about this topic, but I'd come off as harsh and unfeeling.

GADawg
06-07-2009, 10:57 AM
Does this mean he is going to go to rehab on June 14 or that he isn't ready and when he is at a later date, he'll go to rehab.

I would say something else about this topic, but I'd come off as harsh and unfeeling.

somebody has to do it.....I love me some Joey Votto...BUT...you or I can't opt out of work for any extended period of time stating a personal problem(again admitting we have no idea what he's dealing with here)and expect to keep getting paid and/or still have a job when we return.

If I could give Votto any advice upon his return it would be to go all Lyman Bostock and give back his salary(maybe to charity)for this period of time he has been out.

Redlegs
06-07-2009, 11:13 AM
If I could give Votto any advice upon his return it would be to go all Lyman Bostock and give back his salary(maybe to charity)for this period of time he has been out.
Yeah right. Try and get that one past the MLBPA.

Chip R
06-07-2009, 11:14 AM
somebody has to do it.....I love me some Joey Votto...BUT...you or I can't opt out of work for any extended period of time stating a personal problem(again admitting we have no idea what he's dealing with here)and expect to keep getting paid and/or still have a job when we return.

If I could give Votto any advice upon his return it would be to go all Lyman Bostock and give back his salary(maybe to charity)for this period of time he has been out.


Then the Reds should replace him with someone who can show up to work every day, right?

The difference is, you and I have replaceable skills. If I left, they could hire a temp to do my job. After a day or so of training, they would be O.K. These guys - especially Votto - don't have replaceable skils. They can't just hire some temp and have him come in there and produce like Votto can.

Another difference is that if you or I left our job and were hired by another company, we wouldn't necessarily be in a position to hurt our former company. If the Reds let Votto go, 29 other teams would want to snatch him up in an instant and then he would be in a position to hurt the reds since he would play against them.

Redlegs
06-07-2009, 11:22 AM
Sports and the private working sector are two seperate entities. We have short term and long term disability insurances and so forth. They have a contract and I'm sure a player's contract is quite lengthy and covers a lot of situations.

I look at this with more concern than anything else. He's a great young talent who works hard and is a leader by example on and off the field, by all accounts.

westofyou
06-07-2009, 11:23 AM
If I could give Votto any advice upon his return it would be to go all Lyman Bostock and give back his salary(maybe to charity)for this period of time he has been out.

Pretty harsh advice, I hope you never have any personal issues that make life/work hard.

RedEye
06-07-2009, 11:33 AM
Not to take this thread in the wrong direction, but can I just mention that I hate the culture (or lack thereof) around work leave that we have in this country?

I hope Joey feels better soon and that he comes back as good as new. We're all pulling for him.

Hoosier Red
06-07-2009, 11:35 AM
somebody has to do it.....I love me some Joey Votto...BUT...you or I can't opt out of work for any extended period of time stating a personal problem(again admitting we have no idea what he's dealing with here)and expect to keep getting paid and/or still have a job when we return.

If I could give Votto any advice upon his return it would be to go all Lyman Bostock and give back his salary(maybe to charity)for this period of time he has been out.

To be fair, all indications are he's told the Reds what the problem is. He has just asked them to keep it private.

So it's not like he's skipping out on work without telling the boss what's going on.

westofyou
06-07-2009, 11:36 AM
If anyone thinks that Votto should suck it up then I suggest you read up on Tony Horton.

http://stylemens.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2009/04/23/horton.png

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Horton_(baseball_player)

Kc61
06-07-2009, 11:38 AM
I read Dusty's comment as encouraging. He didn't say Votto needs very extensive time off. He said, as I understand it, that Votto will need some rehab time after his DL stay because he has stopped all baseball activities.

Optimistically, Votto becomes available in mid-June, but heads for several days of rehab at that time.

If that's what happens, it's not too bad.

RedlegJake
06-07-2009, 12:04 PM
Young guys have personal issues that affect them. Whether its a family issue or something like Greinke's you have to stay with them. What if the Royals had packaged Greinke off? What if they had gone all hard line on him? Let the Reds deal compassionately and privately with Joey's problem, whatever it is. Baseball, in the final analysis, IS just a game. This must be something that is really affecting this young man's life. Do the right thing by Joey and that, in reality, is doing the right thing by the Reds, too, long term.

GADawg
06-07-2009, 12:21 PM
Pretty harsh advice, I hope you never have any personal issues that make life/work hard.

that's kinda my point...we all at some point or another have issues that need tending to but we all don't have the ability to do it in the manner we'd like. As for the advice...I wouldn't offer that advice to your average Joe living paycheck to paycheck but in Votto's case he probably has the resources to do that in a show of good faith. BTW whoever mentioned the players union balking at this was right on as I hadn't really considered them.

westofyou
06-07-2009, 12:24 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/07/sports/baseball/07spotlight.html?_r=1&ref=sports

June 7, 2009
Spotlight
Putting the Pressure on a Diagnosis
By JIM LUTTRELL


It used to be that people would question whether a player could handle the big stage in cities like New York and Boston. Now, though, there appears to be plenty of pressure off Broadway as well.

This season, Dontrelle Willis of Detroit and Khalil Greene of St. Louis have been on the disabled list with social anxiety disorder. Cincinnati’s Joey Votto went on the D.L. last week for a “stress-related issue.” And of course, Zack Greinke of Kansas City, currently having a breakthrough season, battled social anxiety disorder and depression early in his career.

While few doubt the pressure of playing at the major league level, at least one mental-health professional raised an eyebrow at the growing number of social anxiety disorder diagnoses.

“I’m very suspicious of that diagnosis,” said Dr. Allan Lans, a psychiatrist who practices in New York and has worked with athletes throughout his career, most notably as a member of the Mets’ staff. “It’s not like catching the chickenpox; there has to be a history.”

Lans said social anxiety was a real ailment but was being overdiagnosed. Once a player reaches the majors, Lans said, the issue should not be a surprise.

“What happens in baseball is that players, day after day, are performing in front of varying size crowds,” he said. “At a certain point, they blank out all that stuff and concentrate on their jobs. Repeated exposure is one of the most successful treatments. So for a guy who has been in the public eye to suddenly have social anxiety disorder is a little off the wall, in my book.

“In baseball, you don’t hit most of the time and you make errors some of the time. You learn to deal with it. A person with social anxiety disorder would never have played to begin with.”

A spokesman for the Tigers said the team could not discuss details of Willis’s case because of privacy laws. The Cardinals also declined to comment on Greene. But Brian Britten, the Tigers’ spokesman, said that Major League Baseball has its own doctors and will not allow someone to be put on the disabled list without cause.

Three recent cases involved players who were struggling, possibly for the first time in their careers. Greinke had had only one dominant season in the minors when he was rushed to the majors at 20. Willis, 27, has been unable to duplicate 2005, when he was one of baseball’s most dominant pitchers. Greene, 29, a former first-round draft pick, is in his second season with an average in the low .200s.

Players could be “finding an excuse for why your performance isn’t what it was before,” Lans said. “Look, there are certain instances where it is a real issue, and you’d probably find it’s been there all along — going back to childhood, 7 or 8 years old. So I don’t want to say it doesn’t exist. But you can’t suddenly develop it because you’re not having a good year.”

Sea Ray
06-07-2009, 12:50 PM
I found nothing surprising about Dusty's comments. He's trying to take the media pressure off of Joey and given this injury that's very understandable. It's Dusty's way of saying "don't keep asking me. He'll be back when he's back."

It's only been a week. There's nothing new on this story

mth123
06-07-2009, 01:04 PM
I found nothing surprising about Dusty's comments. He's trying to take the media pressure off of Joey and given this injury that's very understandable. It's Dusty's way of saying "don't keep asking me. He'll be back when he's back."

It's only been a week. There's nothing new on this story

My take as well.

nate
06-07-2009, 01:21 PM
My take as well.

Yep!

kaldaniels
06-07-2009, 01:22 PM
Hey, I just have a curious nature...but what does it mean that Votto took himself out of mid-game on a few occasions...was he having an on-the-spot panic attack? Any speculation?

Joseph
06-07-2009, 01:33 PM
Hey, I just have a curious nature...but what does it mean that Votto took himself out of mid-game on a few occasions...was he having an on-the-spot panic attack? Any speculation?

Initially there was the inner-ear infection diagnosis and that was the belief [and possibly the truth].

As to whats going on now there has been speculation across the board, stress, vertigo, and even issues dealing with his fathers death last year.

RedsManRick
06-07-2009, 01:36 PM
Hey, I just have a curious nature...but what does it mean that Votto took himself out of mid-game on a few occasions...was he having an on-the-spot panic attack? Any speculation?

My understanding is that the panic and the vertigo are closely related. He could have suddenly gotten dizzy or nauseous rather than what we might usually consider a purely psychological panic attack. Either way, I think it's safe to say that when he pulled himself out, he didn't take the decision lightly and had his and the team's best interests in mind.

Edskin
06-07-2009, 01:54 PM
I was going to start a thread on this because this issue has many layers, but this thread seems like a good place for me to put my thoughts:

First of all, without going into detail, I myself, have dealt with a form of anxiety -- it was pretty scary at the time figuring out exactly what was "wrong," so I certainly have sympathy for anyone who may be dealing with something similar (or from the sounds of it in Votto's case) something much more serious.

I have so many thoughts on this topic that I'm just going to make some random bullet points:

--The Reds handling of this issue is curious to me. If they wanted to keep reporters and fans at bay regarding this issue, they could have just stuck with the vertigo diagnosis. They could have said Votto couldn't shake his inner ear problem/dizziness and they thought it was best to DL him and keep him from traveling until it sorted itself out. It may have been a lie, but that would kept inquring minds in check. The "stress related" thing is going to arouse curiosisty. It doesn't matter if it isn't anyone's business, the fact that the Reds are publicly acknowledging this as a "private matter" in a way makes it even more inrtruiging to find out what exactly is going on.

I do think Baker is handling this PERFECTLY and doing the best possible job of protecting his player. It's been said before, but this is where Dusty excels-- excellent with his players and I'm sure Votto appreciates the support he is getting from his skipper. But the fact remains that the "mystery" surrounding his absence is going to keep people interested until Votto speaks. I wonder if a little white lie until Votto was ready to talk about it wouldn't have been better?

--So far Votto's teammates are saying the right things, and I am quite sure that they care about him and want him to get better. However, let's not ignore the giant purple elephant in the room here-- this is professional sports. Is there a place any LESS suited for this type of diagnoses than a lockeroom? Society in general still struggles to fully accept mental/psychological ailments and I don't think a clubhouse is a place where you are going to find the most compassion on this issue. There could very well be a bunch of players thinking, "Hey, I get stressed too, and I don't just take off..." Again, we are not talking right or wrong here, just reality.

--Sports create the ultimate "bunker" or "foxhole" mentality. And the way the Reds are playing right now isn't doing Votto any favors. The team is really battling and playing very hard. The pitching is outstanding and it's painfully clear that the Reds lack that one extra punch from the offense right now. A very good argument can be made that if Votto had played over the past 10 games or so and given his normal production, that the Reds could have easily won 3-4 games that they lost. You see guys like Rosales getting thrown out there a bit early or guys like Hernandez playing out of position-- and it's all a trickle-down from Votto's absense. The team is a critical point in the season and everyone knows how much easier things would be if the #3 hitter was in the line-up right now.

--My guess is that this is a very, very serious issue. There are some things that any of us could probably go to our boss with and get an extended leave-- perhaps an extremely ill immediate family member or something like that. But just general "stress" wouldn't cut it. I don't think this is a matter of Votto getting thrust into the limelight and not being comfortable with it. And it also doesn't make sense to me that this could all stem from the loss of his father. Again, it's a horrible thing to deal with, but it's also something we all deal with. I would imagine that this issue goes much deeper than that.

--I can think of two recent pro athletes that have come out and spoken publicly about some very private matters:

1. Laverneous Coles of the Jets was always thought to be a reclusive and even borderline rude player with the media. Very, very distant. And it apparantly filtered to how he was with his teammates as well. Then, a few years ago, Coles revealed that he was sexually abused as a child. Suddenly, things begin to make more sense. I always thought Coles was incredibly brave to come out and speak on such a taboo issue-- again coming from a person who's daily life takes place in a testosterene fueled, ultra-macho environment, it could not have been easy to come forward.

2. Delonte West of the Cavs missed a majority of the pre-season this year and then revealed that he had been battling depression for quite some time and finally decided he needed to get help. A basketball team is generally very tight, considering there are so few players on the roster and the way they rallied around West was very encouraging.

I do not mean to infer that Votto is dealing with either of these two things. I have absolutely no clue what's going on with him-- I just think they are interesting recent examples of guys that have gone through difficult times and come out of them OK.

--My final thoughts are that I am wishing for the best for Votto. Both for him personally, and for my own selfish reasons as a Reds fan. I'm diasapointed I won't get to see him live when I'm in KC next weekend for the games with the Royals. I hope that whatever is ailing him gets resolved for the long-term and he is able to resume his extremely promising career without a hitch. But it's kind of weird...the longer he keeps himself out of action, the more the pressure builds on him...kind of ironic.

Sea Ray
06-07-2009, 02:09 PM
My understanding is that the panic and the vertigo are closely related. He could have suddenly gotten dizzy or nauseous rather than what we might usually consider a purely psychological panic attack. Either way, I think it's safe to say that when he pulled himself out, he didn't take the decision lightly and had his and the team's best interests in mind.

At this point, I think we have a pretty good idea of what Stubbs' production will look like -- we should get distracted by what's happened in the last 2 weeks.

:confused:

What does Stubbs have to do with this? I'm not following you

Raisor
06-07-2009, 02:10 PM
somebody has to do it.....I love me some Joey Votto...BUT...you or I can't opt out of work for any extended period of time stating a personal problem(again admitting we have no idea what he's dealing with here)and expect to keep getting paid and/or still have a job when we return.
.

I took two months with a personal problem was paid and still had a job when I came back.

fearofpopvol1
06-07-2009, 02:34 PM
Not the news I had hoped to here, but I wish Joey the best.

With this said, if he is not going to be ready in the near future (and when his return will be does seem questionable), Walt needs to get another bat from somewhere. The Reds simply will not be able to continue to compete within the division with their current offensive production.

Blitz Dorsey
06-07-2009, 03:08 PM
What in the heck? I just hope Joey gets well soon for his sake.

Yes, I am worried. This sounds a hell of a lot more serious than "dizziness." The issues are so personal he doesn't want them released to the public? You would think he'd want to let his fans know how he's doing. If it was something minor, you wouldn't keep it private because you know by saying nothing people would assume it's bad.

Wow, this is strange and getting stranger by the day. I think it sucks for the Reds, but I'm worried about Joey the person. Pretty much sucks all around is another way of saying it.

LvJ
06-07-2009, 03:54 PM
Is he wearing girl pants and black eye liner?

C'mon Joey! Hang in there, dude.

Will he ever be able to help the Reds? Something this serious doesn't just simply go away in 15 days. Unless he can deal with it for 2 hrs a day, then he may need to take the year off. Which really sucks for us.

RedsManRick
06-07-2009, 04:26 PM
:confused:

What does Stubbs have to do with this? I'm not following you

LOL. How'd that happen? That's what I get for having two RedsZone windows up at the same time.

westofyou
06-07-2009, 04:26 PM
Is he wearing girl pants and black eye liner?


Why? Need a date?

vaticanplum
06-07-2009, 04:27 PM
--The Reds handling of this issue is curious to me. If they wanted to keep reporters and fans at bay regarding this issue, they could have just stuck with the vertigo diagnosis. They could have said Votto couldn't shake his inner ear problem/dizziness and they thought it was best to DL him and keep him from traveling until it sorted itself out. It may have been a lie, but that would kept inquring minds in check. The "stress related" thing is going to arouse curiosisty. It doesn't matter if it isn't anyone's business, the fact that the Reds are publicly acknowledging this as a "private matter" in a way makes it even more inrtruiging to find out what exactly is going on.

Except that isn't the Reds' fault. I actually respect the way they're handling this. They're being honest but respecting privacy as requested. God knows that if you tell a flat-out lie when you're in the public eye, it can come back to haunt you badly.

We're used to having our curiosity sated about the personal lives of people in the public eye. We're used to it being a standard, and feeding it only makes that more standard. The Reds have taken a step back from that here. Let the public be curious. If more teams followed this path, the public would be conditioned to not be so curious.

LvJ
06-07-2009, 04:38 PM
Why? Need a date? I have no problems admitting that he's a good looking dude. :ughmamoru

Unassisted
06-07-2009, 06:47 PM
If anyone thinks that Votto should suck it up then I suggest you read up on Tony Horton.
Or Jay Mohr's book "Gasping for Airtime (http://www.amazon.com/Gasping-Airtime-Years-Trenches-Saturday/dp/1401300065)."

Deepred05
06-07-2009, 07:01 PM
Not to direct this to the Votto situation, but isn't the modern day player just a bunch of wimps? I swear, everytime one of these drama queens runs into a "padded wall" we get the obligatory down time with a trip from the trainer, reruns of the great catch, and gushing from the announcers about how tough the player is. Same thing when they get hit from a pitch. I saw a player the other night just sit at home plate like he was hurt from getting hit from the pitch, and the replays showed he was never hit!

I just don't remember players from the seventies and eighties acting like this. Hamstrings were taped up, contusions were ignored, and you went out and played with pain. When is the last time you saw a good home plate collision? Is it just me?

westofyou
06-07-2009, 07:15 PM
I just don't remember players from the seventies and eighties acting like this. Hamstrings were taped up, contusions were ignored, and you went out and played with pain.

Then you weren't paying too much attention. Players have been getting hurt and missing time since Cap Anson played. Prior to the 60's the owners treated players like cattle, maybe that's why sometimes you'd see crappy performances day in and day out from guys who should have been DL'd.

Blitz Dorsey
06-07-2009, 07:21 PM
If anyone thinks that Votto should suck it up then I suggest you read up on Tony Horton.

http://stylemens.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2009/04/23/horton.png

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Horton_(baseball_player)

Sounds like if proper medication was around in 1970, Horton would have been fine.

Blitz Dorsey
06-07-2009, 07:24 PM
When is the last time you saw a good home plate collision? Is it just me?

There sure aren't many Adam Dunns out there that will completely truck a catcher if given the chance. I love a good home plate collision (as long as the Reds get the best end of it, of course ;-)

westofyou
06-07-2009, 07:25 PM
Collisions are for back and forth games with pads... this is baseball.

BCubb2003
06-07-2009, 07:29 PM
I think in previous generations you had a lot of broken-down ex-ballplayers back in the small towns they came from. Now you have ballplayers who play with their hamstrings bolted on.

RFS62
06-07-2009, 08:40 PM
Back in the day, the players knew that their jobs hung by a thin strand. Sitting out when hurt was a good way to lose your job.

They lived from paycheck to paycheck, and the alternative was often menial labor. The smarter ones might sell insurance or work on a car lot, the uneducated ones, of which there were many, went back to the farm or construction or factory work.

Not that there's anything wrong with any of those jobs. But when you're in one of the most elite clubs on earth, you'll do anything to stay there.

Today, they are often set for life after a few years in the show, unless they squander their money. Back then, they were disposable and easily replaceable.

Not the stars, but the vast majority of regular players.

But even the stars played through pain and injury.

Money has changed everything. The owners have to protect their investments, and the players their future earning potential.

Ltlabner
06-07-2009, 09:20 PM
Dusty's skill as a "players manager" is coming to the fore in this situation. I have to tip my hat to him. Protecting his player while dealing with the press.

Other than that, all I'll say is peoples understanding and compassion for mental health issues (assuming that is what this is) is shameful. Suggestions that he "walk it off", is a wimp or should wear a dress says more about the poster than Joey.

Deepred05
06-07-2009, 09:51 PM
Back in the day, the players knew that their jobs hung by a thin strand. Sitting out when hurt was a good way to lose your job.

They lived from paycheck to paycheck, and the alternative was often menial labor. The smarter ones might sell insurance or work on a car lot, the uneducated ones, of which there were many, went back to the farm or construction or factory work.

Not that there's anything wrong with any of those jobs. But when you're in one of the most elite clubs on earth, you'll do anything to stay there.

Today, they are often set for life after a few years in the show, unless they squander their money. Back then, they were disposable and easily replaceable.

Not the stars, but the vast majority of regular players.

But even the stars played through pain and injury.

Money has changed everything. The owners have to protect their investments, and the players their future earning potential.

Tom Servo
06-07-2009, 10:14 PM
Other than that, all I'll say is peoples understanding and compassion for mental health issues (assuming that is what this is) is shameful. Suggestions that he "walk it off", is a wimp or should wear a dress says more about the poster than Joey.
Completely agreed.

westofyou
06-07-2009, 10:16 PM
Back in the day, the players knew that their jobs hung by a thin strand. Sitting out when hurt was a good way to lose your job.

They lived from paycheck to paycheck, and the alternative was often menial labor. The smarter ones might sell insurance or work on a car lot, the uneducated ones, of which there were many, went back to the farm or construction or factory work.

Not that there's anything wrong with any of those jobs. But when you're in one of the most elite clubs on earth, you'll do anything to stay there.

Today, they are often set for life after a few years in the show, unless they squander their money. Back then, they were disposable and easily replaceable.

Not the stars, but the vast majority of regular players.

But even the stars played through pain and injury.

Money has changed everything. The owners have to protect their investments, and the players their future earning potential.

While this is all true, back in the day means pre arb and pre players union.. in the 70's and the 80's players were injured and knocked for it as well.. Eric Davis is a classic example of that.

RFS62
06-07-2009, 10:20 PM
Dusty's skill as a "players manager" is coming to the fore in this situation. I have to tip my hat to him. Protecting his player while dealing with the press.

Other than that, all I'll say is peoples understanding and compassion for mental health issues (assuming that is what this is) is shameful. Suggestions that he "walk it off", is a wimp or should wear a dress says more about the poster than Joey.


Completely agreed.


I agree as well. Maybe some good will come from this in the long run as more people are exposed to these issues and understand that it's not a character issue. It's a legitimate health issue, no different than a broken arm.

We'd never think to blame him if he had a cast on his arm and couldn't play. The only real difference between that and his condition is that it's often misunderstood, even by well intending people.

It isn't a matter of sucking it up. That implies lack of character, which has absolutely nothing to do with any of this.

BCubb2003
06-07-2009, 10:57 PM
I just don't know where all the malingering talk comes from. He's not Gary Sheffield or Milton Bradley or any "Operation Shutdown" malcontent. He's not fighting with management or angling for a contract, trade or playing time. Outspoken instigators like Phillips or Arroyo have not said a thing against him. He's tried to play through it and played well when he could.

I think maybe it comes from how we know all we need to know about somebody's broken thumb, but beyond a certain point a medical condition comes under the HIPAA laws and then there's not much you can say about it. There's probably not a category on the Disabled List form for "flu-induced inner-ear-related anxiety spells," so it's labeled as "stress" which sounds like "choke" to fans. Any attempt by the team to say as little as possible just makes it seem more sinister.

I just hope it's not a Nick Esasky, J.R. Richard, Jimmy Piersall situation, and we don't look back some day and regret what we said about a player we all like.

buckeyenut
06-07-2009, 10:59 PM
somebody has to do it.....I love me some Joey Votto...BUT...you or I can't opt out of work for any extended period of time stating a personal problem(again admitting we have no idea what he's dealing with here)and expect to keep getting paid and/or still have a job when we return.

If I could give Votto any advice upon his return it would be to go all Lyman Bostock and give back his salary(maybe to charity)for this period of time he has been out.
Actually, people do it all the time. For deaths, illnesses, family issues, etc.

His boss (Baker) clearly knows what's going on. The rest of us, quite frankly, it is none of our business. And he has clearance from his boss to deal with whatever it is. Should be enough said.

camisadelgolf
06-08-2009, 01:21 AM
I found this in the Sun Deck last week.

Ok so I talked to someone close to the situation tonight. Not 100% so I'm not going to start a new thread or proclaim this is the end all of the situation, but Votto aparently has a vestibular disorder which is causing him major anxiety and suffering. This could be something that plagues him for quite some time and he might not be back before the All-Star break if at all.... there is no timetable as of right now. More as I hear it.

kaldaniels
06-08-2009, 01:26 AM
I found this in the Sun Deck last week.

Possible of course, but if it is true I don't understand the secrecy at all.

Caveat Emperor
06-08-2009, 01:32 AM
Possible of course, but if it is true I don't understand the secrecy at all.

Every indication out there is that the Reds are respecting Joey's wish to keep all of this private.

Really, at this point, I'd suggest we respect that wish as well. There's not a lot of new ground to be mined on this subject until Joey speaks. Everything else is idle speculation at best or, if someone does know something and posts it for the public to see, a breach of Joey's confidence at worse.

camisadelgolf
06-08-2009, 01:47 AM
Possible of course, but if it is true I don't understand the secrecy at all.
Personally, I wouldn't want it public, so it makes sense to me.

Blitz Dorsey
06-08-2009, 01:50 AM
Hopefully Joey gets the meds he needs. There are all kinds of things out there to treat anxiety and depression of all sorts (if that's what this is, which we obviously don't know for sure).

kaldaniels
06-08-2009, 01:55 AM
Personally, I wouldn't want it public, so it makes sense to me.

To a fool like me, stress and anxiety are relatively close, so if you put it out there that you are on the DL for stress, why not add the info about it being inner-ear related.

WVRedsFan
06-08-2009, 02:00 AM
I really don't have a problem with what is going on with Votto. I have a bigger problem on what is going on at shortstop and the outfield. People have problems and I'm glad the Reds are working with Joey to do what they can to help him get back to 100%. You have to wonder what the Yankees would do here (I don't know--I'm just assuming they wouldn't be so understanding).

This team needs Votto's bat, but I'm not dissing Hernandez one bit. He has shown life at the plate which is more than can be said for many other members of this team.

camisadelgolf
06-08-2009, 02:22 AM
To a fool like me, stress and anxiety are relatively close, so if you put it out there that you are on the DL for stress, why not add the info about it being inner-ear related.
Whenever I get into specifics about a condition I'm going through, people tend to feel a need to talk about it, which adds to the stress. And people who don't talk about it to my face sometimes say things like, "Well, ______ went through the same thing, and then he was fine in just a few days. What's wrong with [camisadelgolf]? Why is it taking so long?" I mean, it's just a bunch of stuff I don't want to hear, and sometimes, it makes things worse.

Redlegs
06-08-2009, 09:08 AM
I wonder if Votto developed this disorder after his dad died.
I've had anxiety before and it's a strange, unsettling feeling.

durl
06-08-2009, 10:07 AM
All this makes me wonder if Alonso is getting a lot more attention from the Reds' front office these days. It always seemed as though he'd be traded away to obtain help for other positions, but he may be called up to take over 1B if Votto is not able to play the game any longer.

That being said, I really hope that Votto is able to successfully overcome his personal matters. It sure is fun to watch him play.

OnBaseMachine
06-10-2009, 02:37 AM
Votto working out

Some good news for the Reds: Joey Votto is working out in Cincinnati worked out Monday and worked out Tuesday.

"That's a good sign because he is going through all the regular routines," said Baker. "He's a hard-working guy and it's a good sign when he is working out. Our trainer, Mark Mann, is on the DL, too (broken foot), so he stayed back to work with him."

Votto is eligible to come off the DL Sunday and Baker was asked if he might start minor-league rehab in a day or two and be ready to play Sunday.

"It'll be two weeks Sunday?" asked Baker. "Seems longer. He could do that, but I don't want to put that time frame on him. All I know he is doing better and working on coming back."

http://www.daytondailynews.com/dayton-sports/cincinnati-reds/dunn-brushes-off-phillips-barb-155818.html

Tommyjohn25
06-10-2009, 09:05 AM
Man, that's good to read. Take it step by step Joey.

HeatherC1212
06-10-2009, 09:55 AM
I'm SO glad to read that Joey is working out again. Hopefully this means he's on the mend and should rejoin the club soon. :)

reds1869
06-10-2009, 09:58 AM
I hope everything works out for Votto. I've had severe anxiety due to my chronic medical condition, so to some extent I understand what Joey is experiencing. Keep pushing through, young man; we need you back!