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Raisor
07-04-2009, 09:01 PM
Fans, for the past two weeks you have been reading about the bad break I got. Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of this earth. I have been in ballparks for 17 years and have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans.

Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldnít consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day? Sure, Iím lucky. Who wouldnít consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert? Also, the builder of baseballís greatest empire, Ed Barrow? To have spent six years with that wonderful little fellow, Miller Huggins? Then to have spent the next nine years with that outstanding leader, that smart student of psychology, the best manager in baseball today, Joe McCarthy? Sure, Iím lucky.

When the New York Giants, a team you would give your right arm to beat, and vice versa, sends you a gift Ė thatís something. When everybody down to the groundskeepers and those boys in white coats remember you with trophies Ė thatís something. When you have a wonderful mother-in-law who takes sides with you in squabbles with her own daughter Ė thatís something. When you have a father and a mother who work all their lives so you can have an education and build your body Ė itís a blessing. When you have a wife who has been a tower of strength and shown more courage than you dreamed existed Ė thatís the finest I know.

So I close in saying that I may have had a tough break, but I have an awful lot to live for.

Brutus
07-04-2009, 09:04 PM
Today-ay-ay

I consider my-self (self, self, self)

The luckiest man..an..an

On the face of the earth, earth, earth.

OnBaseMachine
07-04-2009, 09:46 PM
I get goosebumps everytime I hear that speech.

If I could go back in time and watch any player in history, Lou Gehrig would be near the top of my list.

wally post
07-04-2009, 10:00 PM
That is absolutely beautiful.

George Anderson
07-04-2009, 10:28 PM
If you like Gehrig, "Luckiest Man" by Jonathon Eig is a good read.

http://www.amazon.com/Luckiest-Man-Life-Death-Gehrig/dp/B000W3W8PA

Always Red
07-04-2009, 10:50 PM
Raisor, thank you for posting that speech.

I have thought about Gehrig all day long. 70 years ago he gave that little speech, and it is almost more famous now than it ever was.

Gehrig was a complex man, had a college education (engineering major) during a time when most ballplayers were extremely ill-educated. He was, of course one of the greatest ballplayers of all time, yet was always 2nd fiddle on his own team.

I love this vid of Gehrig; it doesn't show the whole speech, but it does show a lot of him and Ruth and the Yankees and baseball during a much simpler time. This video moves me because it shows how quiet, graceful, dignified and downright great Gehrig really was. America needs men like him these days. Gehrig did not actively seek fortune, glory and fame, but it came to him. This little speech is more famous than ever because I think people recognize the humility and basic goodness in it, and in Lou Gehrig.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Akxduexqug

Mario-Rijo
07-05-2009, 01:47 AM
Raisor, thank you for posting that speech.

I have thought about Gehrig all day long. 70 years ago he gave that little speech, and it is almost more famous now than it ever was.

Gehrig was a complex man, had a college education (engineering major) during a time when most ballplayers were extremely ill-educated. He was, of course one of the greatest ballplayers of all time, yet was always 2nd fiddle on his own team.

I love this vid of Gehrig; it doesn't show the whole speech, but it does show a lot of him and Ruth and the Yankees and baseball during a much simpler time. This video moves me because it shows how quiet, graceful, dignified and downright great Gehrig really was. America needs men like him these days. Gehrig did not actively seek fortune, glory and fame, but it came to him. This little speech is more famous than ever because I think people recognize the humility and basic goodness in it, and in Lou Gehrig.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Akxduexqug

Damn fine post AR and how true it is.

cumberlandreds
07-05-2009, 04:55 PM
If you like Gehrig, "Luckiest Man" by Jonathon Eig is a good read.

http://www.amazon.com/Luckiest-Man-Life-Death-Gehrig/dp/B000W3W8PA

I concur. A great book!That speech is just remarkable. It was totally off the cuff. He wasn't expected to say anything to the crowd and only did after starting to walk away after the last scheduled speaker. IMO,that's one of the great speeches of all time.