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View Full Version : Sixty Feet Six Inches - Lonnie Wheeler's newest book



redsmetz
07-13-2009, 01:04 PM
I came across a video on Youtube of a conversation between Reggie Jackson and Bob Gibson on "Who Owns the Plate". Looks like it's part of the pre-publication of one-time Cincinnati Post writer Lonnie Wheeler's latest collaboration, this time with Jackson & Gibson. The book is titled Sixty Feet, Six Inches: A Hall of Fame Pitcher & a Hall of Fame Hitter Talk about How the Game is Played.

According to Amazon, it's coming out in about two months. It looks to be an interesting read.

Here's the video clip

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJlUD6o30rg

jojo
07-13-2009, 02:25 PM
Thanks for this....

jojo
07-13-2009, 02:31 PM
My favorite quote from Gibson:

"You don't knock 'em down for that kind of stuff (hitter stepping out of the batters box to try and disrupt a pitcher's rhythm)-they give you plenty of other reasons to knock 'em down"

Chip R
07-13-2009, 02:35 PM
My favorite quote from Gibson:

"You don't knock 'em down for that kind of stuff (hitter stepping out of the batters box to try and disrupt a pitcher's rhythm)-they give you plenty of other reasons to knock 'em down"

Tough, tough pitcher. Helluva athlete as well. Wonder how guys like him and Drysdale would fare in today's game.

jojo
07-13-2009, 02:43 PM
Tough, tough pitcher. Helluva athlete as well. Wonder how guys like him and Drysdale would fare in today's game.

I would love to see Bob Gibson circa '68 versus Bonds and his body armor circa '01...

redsmetz
10-12-2009, 10:11 AM
I just caught the ad in passing, but I think Terry Gross will be interviewing Bob Gibson and Reggie Jackson on her NPR Fresh Air show today. It airs in Cincinnati on WVXU at noon (91.7). You can check on NPR's website for what station carries it if you're not in Cincinnati. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=13

I don't know if the interview includes Lonnie Wheeler.

redsmetz
10-12-2009, 02:47 PM
I just caught the ad in passing, but I think Terry Gross will be interviewing Bob Gibson and Reggie Jackson on her NPR Fresh Air show today. It airs in Cincinnati on WVXU at noon (91.7). You can check on NPR's website for what station carries it if you're not in Cincinnati. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=13

I don't know if the interview includes Lonnie Wheeler.

Just listened to the interview of the two greats and it's worth hearing. You can find it at the link above and click on today's show. There's two different segments to the show, the Jackson & Gibson interview is second. Jackson tells a terrific story about returning to play after getting hit in the head that's worth hearing. I saw Wheeler's book at Josephbeth in Norwood. Guess I'll put it on my birthday list (or Xmas).

redsmetz
10-27-2010, 05:30 PM
I know I mentioned this book in the off-season reading thread, but thought I'd pull this one forward. I just finished reading this book last night and highly recommend it to everyone. The book is a back and forth between Gibson and Jackson on numerous topics of interest, from their individual careers, the people they played with, how the game has changed.

Both Gibson and Jackson are interesting, although I was surprised by the depth of Jackson's knowledge of the game and the folks that came before him. I don't know why that is, but he came off as more cerebral than I expected, is what I'm saying.

Topcat
10-28-2010, 03:39 AM
I would love to see Bob Gibson circa '68 versus Bonds and his body armor circa '01...


I have always believed that truly great player under the same conditions as any players time period would be great players but that's just me.:thumbup:

Roy Tucker
10-28-2010, 07:26 AM
Reportedly, Reggie Jackson has an IQ of 160.

redsmetz
10-28-2010, 07:41 AM
Tough, tough pitcher. Helluva athlete as well. Wonder how guys like him and Drysdale would fare in today's game.

Gibson talks about this in the book. Basically he suggests that the quick reaction to anything inside, obviously, has altered the game. IIRC, he was saying that his game would have been taken away; not that he was intentionally trying to hit guys, but noting that the outside of the plate is his and he had a right to back guys off who were cheating him that space. Jackson noted that he would surreptitiously set himself up to differently at the plate, but I can't remember now if it was to have a better shot at outside pitches or to better handle the inside pitch, which he said he often had trouble with.

redsmetz
10-28-2010, 07:44 AM
I would love to see Bob Gibson circa '68 versus Bonds and his body armor circa '01...

They both spoke highly of Bonds and his natural abilities and his plate discipline. They had a decent discussion of steroids and what they may or may not have done. I think Gibson suggested he might have particularly later in his career (although he said it wouldn't have done him much good in the last couple) and Jackson said he didn't think he would have fearing messing up the talent he'd been given.

Interestingly, they noted that the steroid era was a dilemma for the old classic Punch & Judy type hitter who was potentially be left behind by other players of similar talent stepping it up a bit more by using steroids.

jojo
10-28-2010, 08:58 AM
I have always believed that truly great player under the same conditions as any players time period would be great players but that's just me.:thumbup:

Isn't that the point of seeing '68 Gibson versus '01 Bonds?

redsmetz
09-18-2014, 08:10 AM
I'm going to bump this up; partially because there were some interesting points made by various posters, but also as a platform what I wanted to post (and I figured, why start a new thread).

My son emailed me a link on a story about Cincinnati writer Lonnie Wheeler which I'd already seen on Facebook as well. It's primarily about him having ghostwritten a number of autobiographies (although most say something like "as told to..."). But it mentions the current book he's writing with Bob Gibson with a "working title" called [I]Pitch by Pitch[I] on Gibson's masterpiece in Game 1 of the 1968 World Series.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/09/17/a-ghostwriter-steps-out-of-the-shadows.html?via=desktop&source=facebook

NB: The article mentions the non-sports autobiography he did with former Detroit mayor Coleman Young - any comments on that aspect of the article should be over in the politics forum, not here in the ORG. Let's keep this discussion about the baseball aspects of the article and Wheeler's work.