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View Full Version : Bob Gibson Selling His '68 MVP & Cy Young Awards, HoF Ring, '67 WS Ring, etc.



Bob Borkowski
07-17-2009, 12:22 AM
Seems odd to me that he would be selling this stuff.

Financial problems? Or maybe he is just clearing out some of the useless clutter in his home. ;)

Check it out here.

http://www.legendaryauctions.com/catalog.aspx?category=49&auctionid=62

mbgrayson
07-17-2009, 12:26 AM
That is very sad... I can't imagine anyone selling off that stuff voluntarily.

George Anderson
07-17-2009, 12:42 AM
According to the reporter, Bob is not hurting for money.

http://www.ksdk.com/sports/story.aspx?storyid=179798

TheNext44
07-17-2009, 12:43 AM
I think it is more the lure of a nice payday rather than a need for money.

Gibson is a smart man, and while he never made the big bucks in the majors, retiring right when free agency started, he's worked on the radio and TV most of the time he's been retired, and works with the Cards a special coach, among many other projects.

He's probably not hurting for money, but like many of us, would be glad to see an extra few $100,000 in his saving account.

Don't know the guy, but it doesn't seem like the overly sentimental type. I know if it were me, a World Series ring itself wouldn't mean much, knowing that I earned one would be all the satisfaction I would need.

WVRedsFan
07-17-2009, 12:45 AM
If there are not any financial problems, it speaks volumes. Those awards, at lest the handware, meant nothing to him. Nothing wrong with that, but wouldn't it make more sense to give it to a museum or a charity for auction (maybe a stretch there) or something like that?

TheNext44
07-17-2009, 12:56 AM
If there are not any financial problems, it speaks volumes. Those awards, at lest the handware, meant nothing to him. Nothing wrong with that, but wouldn't it make more sense to give it to a museum or a charity for auction (maybe a stretch there) or something like that?

Some of it is going to a charity. Not announced how much though.

http://www.stltoday.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=7249484


In addition to making Gibson’s historic collection the cornerstone of its live summer sale, Legendary Auctions will give collectors another reason to feel even better about bidding on the items. The event will serve to raise money for the Baseball Assistance Team (B.A.T.). The mission of this charity is to aid those members of the "baseball family" that are most in need. B.A.T. strives to provide a means of support for people who are unable to help themselves


“We are pleased to select a worthwhile charity to benefit from this year’s event,” says Allen. “It was the natural choice, given Bob’s involvement and passion for this organization. The Legendary Auctions live summer auction promises to be a spectacular industry event.”

WVRedsFan
07-17-2009, 01:24 AM
Some of it is going to a charity. Not announced how much though.

http://www.stltoday.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=7249484

No problems from me then. Of course, it is his stuff, so he can do with it what he pleases. Maybe it's just me, but I'd keep the stuff because it's baseball history. But like I say, that's just me.

Edskin
07-17-2009, 06:05 AM
Different strokes for different folks...those things would be precious to me. Heck, I'm a fan and I cherish my memorbilia from great/championship seasons. If I were Gibson, I'd definitely hold on to those things and pass them down in my family.

I do think it says something about his personality that he's selling them, but I don't think it's "good" or "bad." Gibson was known as a very hard thrower, a hard competitor, and a hard man in general. If he "feels" nothing towards those relics, than I guess you might as well cash in.

cumberlandreds
07-17-2009, 09:20 AM
Some of it is going to a charity. Not announced how much though.

http://www.stltoday.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=7249484

If most is going to BAT then that's a very worthwhile cause. Gibson has always come off as a grumpy old man, similar to Feller. I can see him not being very sentimental to the past. Which is fine. A lot of people aren't that way. You would think though he would leave it to his family,if he has kid or grandkids.

Chip R
07-17-2009, 09:27 AM
Different strokes for different folks...those things would be precious to me. Heck, I'm a fan and I cherish my memorbilia from great/championship seasons. If I were Gibson, I'd definitely hold on to those things and pass them down in my family.

I do think it says something about his personality that he's selling them, but I don't think it's "good" or "bad." Gibson was known as a very hard thrower, a hard competitor, and a hard man in general. If he "feels" nothing towards those relics, than I guess you might as well cash in.


Perhaps he feels that he doesn't need the hardware. It's not like if he sells it off they are going to strike his name from the record books. And this way he's doing some good for guys who need the help.

Bob Borkowski
07-17-2009, 09:35 AM
Some of it is going to a charity. Not announced how much though.

http://www.stltoday.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=7249484

Notice the wording in the article: "The event will serve to raise money for the Baseball Assistance Team." That indicates to me that Gibson might receive the proceeds from the auction and B.A.T. could receive maybe a portion from the auction house cut...or something like that.

The last 10 or so months have been a real bear for many people financially. Maybe Gibson simply got caught in a bind and he saw this as a partial solution.

I haven't seen any estimate on total return on this auction. Does half a million sound reasonable?

westofyou
07-17-2009, 09:58 AM
Stuff is not what life is about, perhaps Bob knows that?

Bob Borkowski
07-17-2009, 10:03 AM
Stuff is not what life is about, perhaps Bob knows that?

Certainly agree with that, but he is selling the 'stuff' for greenbacks, not presenting the articles to museums.

westofyou
07-17-2009, 10:05 AM
Certainly agree with that, but he is selling the 'stuff' for greenbacks, not presenting the articles to museums.
Bob grew up in severe poverty, a child of the depression, he retired prior to Free Agency... I fully expect him to want something for his accomplishments, and you can't buy security with trophies.

TheNext44
07-17-2009, 02:11 PM
If most is going to BAT then that's a very worthwhile cause. Gibson has always come off as a grumpy old man, similar to Feller. I can see him not being very sentimental to the past. Which is fine. A lot of people aren't that way. You would think though he would leave it to his family,if he has kid or grandkids.

I had one chance to meet him, and he did not disappoint.

Bill Peterson, who used to write for the Post and still writes for Citybeat, is a friend of mine from school.

He once brought me into the Cards clubhouse during spring training. He gave me an extra press pass he had and an extra reporters pad, and said I could come in as long as I didn't talk to anyone.

Well I saw Gibson in the corner, all alone, and I couldn't resist. So I went up to him, press pass on my chest, reporters pad in hand, and asked him what he thought of the Cards young pitchers coming up.

He took one look at me, then without pause asked, "Who the f*&% are you?"

I ran away as fast as I could, and luckily, Peterson did not get into trouble.

Chip R
07-17-2009, 02:30 PM
Bill Peterson, who used to write for the Post and still writes for Citybeat, is a friend of mine from school.


Not anymore. :(

Edskin
07-17-2009, 10:17 PM
Stuff is not what life is about, perhaps Bob knows that?

You can say that about money as well. And if you can turn stuff into money, then it's all basically the same anyway.

Like I said before, different strokes for different folks, and neither way is good or bad.

But I think the "stuff is not what life is about" comment is a bit simplistic. It's certainly true in a sense that if your entire life revolves around material possessions, that you probably haven't lived life to the fullest. However, I'm sure there are "things" that everyone here at RZ has that have a certain special meaning to them for a variety of reasons.

WOY-- You are a hockey guy, so you know all about the importance and historical significance of the Stanley Cup. It's just a trophy, but I bet if it was announced that all the past names on the trophy were going to be erased so they could start fresh, it would really irk some people.

I'm straying here....getting fairly general and off-topic, but to clarify, I do not condemn or criticize Gibson for selling his things-- but I also won't commend him for realizing that it's "just stuff."

westofyou
07-17-2009, 10:28 PM
You can say that about money as well. And if you can turn stuff into money, then it's all basically the same anyway.

Like I said before, different strokes for different folks, and neither way is good or bad.

But I think the "stuff is not what life is about" comment is a bit simplistic. It's certainly true in a sense that if your entire life revolves around material possessions, that you probably haven't lived life to the fullest. However, I'm sure there are "things" that everyone here at RZ has that have a certain special meaning to them for a variety of reasons.

WOY-- You are a hockey guy, so you know all about the importance and historical significance of the Stanley Cup. It's just a trophy, but I bet if it was announced that all the past names on the trophy were going to be erased so they could start fresh, it would really irk some people.

I'm straying here....getting fairly general and off-topic, but to clarify, I do not condemn or criticize Gibson for selling his things-- but I also won't commend him for realizing that it's "just stuff."

I know what you mean, I really do, I have some "stuff" that I've been dragging around for 30 years.

But in the end some of that stuff pales in comparison to what that stuff gave me, unique experiences, feelings of accomplishment, growth, friends, ect... I know that I have that stuff in me, so I don't need a talisman to remind me of it.

But I still have my stuff, some in boxes, some on shelves, but way more in my being.

That said sometimes stuff is just money, but you can't buy dinner with it.

That said, Bob Gibson can do whatever he wants to do with his stuff, I probably wouldn't .. but I didn't play for the Harlem Globetrotters, win 2 World Championships and strike out 17 Tigers in a World Series game so I'll never know what kind of stuff he really has that isn't material, but from afar he seems awful rich to me.

REDREAD
07-18-2009, 12:35 AM
He took one look at me, then without pause asked, "Who the f*&% are you?"

I ran away as fast as I could, and luckily, Peterson did not get into trouble.

Great story. Sorry it did not have a happy ending for you, but thanks for sharing.

Mario-Rijo
07-18-2009, 06:49 PM
I know what you mean, I really do, I have some "stuff" that I've been dragging around for 30 years.

But in the end some of that stuff pales in comparison to what that stuff gave me, unique experiences, feelings of accomplishment, growth, friends, ect... I know that I have that stuff in me, so I don't need a talisman to remind me of it.

But I still have my stuff, some in boxes, some on shelves, but way more in my being.

That said sometimes stuff is just money, but you can't buy dinner with it.

That said, Bob Gibson can do whatever he wants to do with his stuff, I probably wouldn't .. but I didn't play for the Harlem Globetrotters, win 2 World Championships and strike out 17 Tigers in a World Series game so I'll never know what kind of stuff he really has that isn't material, but from afar he seems awful rich to me.

This makes me harkin back to a George Carlin piece which I absolutely love. I won't post it here due to explicits but anyone who hasn't heard it (I can't imagine who hasn't but who knows) I recommend it. You can find it on youtube I'm sure under "Stuff".

Heath
07-21-2009, 12:03 AM
I've read some books on Bob Gibson, I don't think I'm a Gibson expert by any stretch of the imagination, but Bob seemed to think this accomplishments were more of doing his job right. He had the talent, he just was very good, and he never really thought of the materialist stuff. He knew he was good and he wouldn't settle for average. He was driven to be the best.

Ron Madden
07-21-2009, 02:34 AM
The way I look at it is, it's his stuff he can do what ever he wants with it.

mth123
07-21-2009, 04:36 AM
Bob Gibson will be 74 in November. The memories of how the stuff was earned will hopefully stay with him until the end. The trinkets themselves probably don't do much for him in his waning years. If it were me, I'd cash them in for all I could get in order to use the money to make my final years as enjoyable and comfortable as possible. He's not going to take those trinkets with him.

Degenerate39
07-21-2009, 07:06 AM
Bob Gibson will be 74 in November. The memories of how the stuff was earned will hopefully stay with him until the end. The trinkets themselves probably don't do much for him in his waning years. If it were me, I'd cash them in for all I could get in order to use the money to make my final years as enjoyable and comfortable as possible. He's not going to take those trinkets with him.

I think the ancient Egyptians would disagree :roll:

OldRightHander
07-22-2009, 12:05 PM
I think the ancient Egyptians would disagree :roll:

We see how well that worked out for them. We have all of their stuff in museums.

Without Gibson's stuff, he never would have earned all that other stuff anyway.

Bob Borkowski
07-23-2009, 11:35 AM
I just checked the progress of the auction and so far the 1971 Gold Glove Award is drawing the most interest.

However, that just might be because that item has the lowest minimum bid requirement.

Bob Borkowski
08-01-2009, 07:52 PM
I haven't seen any estimate on total return on this auction. Does half a million sound reasonable?

Hey, pretty good estimate, Bob. :cool:


The auction is closed...there was a 'LIVE' part of the auction at the end.

Total 'Final Bids' was $456,900. The item drawing the highest bid was, not surprisingly, the 1968 NL MVP award...$120,000.

George Anderson
08-01-2009, 09:27 PM
Hey, pretty good estimate, Bob. :cool:


The auction is closed...there was a 'LIVE' part of the auction at the end.

Total 'Final Bids' was $456,900. The item drawing the highest bid was, not surprisingly, the 1968 NL MVP award...$120,000.

I wonder after taxes how much that is?

Maybe Bob was trying to cash in while the tax rate is somewhat reasonable for now anyway.