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Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 12:56 AM
Is that considered "striking out the side"???

I always thought "striking out the side" meant not giving up any runs (or hits or walks -- just 3 straight Ks), but maybe I'm mistaken. It's one of the many things that annoy me about George Grande. He always goes out of his way to say the pitcher "struck out the side" even if he happened to give up an earned run or three. I imagine George is right, but I wanted to check with some of the savants on this here board.

Cedric
07-19-2009, 12:57 AM
Is that considered "striking out the side"???

I always thought "striking out the side" meant not giving up any runs (or hits or walks), but maybe I'm mistaken. It's one of the many things that annoy me about George Grande. He always goes out of his way to say the pitcher "struck out the side" even if he happened to give up an earned run or three. I imagine George is right, but I wanted to check with some of the savants on this here board.

That's just George being wrong.

Homer Bailey
07-19-2009, 12:57 AM
The way I understand it, if you strike out 3 hitters in an inning, it is considered striking out the side, but I do understand what you are saying. I think it should only be said when it goes one two three K K K.

If a pitcher gets 2 K's, then gets a third but he reaches base, then gets a pop up, is it striking out the side?

Cedric
07-19-2009, 12:58 AM
Striking out the side is retiring the only three scheduled batters in an inning. That's it.

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 12:59 AM
And if it is considering striking out the side, the term then makes no sense. The batter that hit the HR certainly didn't strike out, so how could you have struck out the "side?" ("Side" meaning all the batters you faced that inning.)

Don't worry, I won't list the other 999 things that make George Grande the worst announcer in Major League Baseball.

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 01:02 AM
Striking out the side is retiring the only three scheduled batters in an inning. That's it.

Yes, this is what I thought. George is not on the smiling side of this discussion.

Cedric
07-19-2009, 01:02 AM
I mean it's not a black/white issue. There is no "law". The "side" is the 3 opposing hitters scheduled in an inning. Technically it would also be striking out the side if the catcher drops strikeout number 3 and the pitcher goes on to also strikeout hitter number 4 in an inning.

Degenerate39
07-19-2009, 01:02 AM
I thought striking out the side just mean all of the outs were strikeouts. Doesn't matter if you gave a hit, walk, homer, etc. As long as the outs were K's.

Cedric
07-19-2009, 01:04 AM
I thought striking out the side just mean all of the outs were strikeouts. Doesn't matter if you gave a hit, walk, homer, etc. As long as the outs were K's.

Again it's semantics and there is no written rule on when the saying has to be used. It is widely held that striking out the side is striking out the scheduled 3 batters in an inning.

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 01:05 AM
I thought striking out the side just mean all of the outs were strikeouts. Doesn't matter if you gave a hit, walk, homer, etc. As long as the outs were K's.

How is that the "side" then? The side is only the guys that happen to strike out. Ignore the 8 guys that hit home runs? (I know that's an extreme example, but it gets the point across.)

PuffyPig
07-19-2009, 01:09 AM
Striking out the side is retiring the only three scheduled batters in an inning. That's it.


How about he strikes out all four batters in the inning?

Cedric
07-19-2009, 01:10 AM
I wrote about that above also. Shouldn't have said "that's it."

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 01:12 AM
In sports terminology, the word "side" means the other team. "Those guys on the other side are good players and it's going to be tough to beat them."

If you "strike out the side" in a particular inning, that implies you struck out every batter that you faced. Even if you give up a passed ball on the third K of the inning and that batter reaches, and then the following batter hits a HR, that is not considered striking out the side in my book. In that inning, the pitcher's line would be 2 R, 0 ER, 1 H, 0 BB, 3 K. But that would not be striking out the side.

Razor Shines
07-19-2009, 01:19 AM
Striking out the side is retiring the only three scheduled batters in an inning. That's it.

Ok, so when a pitcher retires the side does that mean he the other team went 1,2,3? I thougth "side" just meant that side of the inning. Therefore striking out the side would just mean that all 3 outs were via the strike out.

Brutus
07-19-2009, 01:19 AM
George is not really "wrong" on this. There are some people that refer to the "side" as the three scheduled batters in an inning. However, there are other people that refer to the "side" as the three recorded outs in an inning.

It really depends on who you ask. To know the right answer, it probably comes down to the origination of the phrase. However, I've heard it more often referred to the three recorded outs, meaning even if there's a homer in there, three strikeouts means striking out the side.

TheNext44
07-19-2009, 03:27 AM
This thread should be sent to the OED. Very impressive discussion. :)

Degenerate39
07-19-2009, 03:48 AM
George is not really "wrong" on this. There are some people that refer to the "side" as the three scheduled batters in an inning. However, there are other people that refer to the "side" as the three recorded outs in an inning.

It really depends on who you ask. To know the right answer, it probably comes down to the origination of the phrase. However, I've heard it more often referred to the three recorded outs, meaning even if there's a homer in there, three strikeouts means striking out the side.

So no one is really wrong in this discussion

BCubb2003
07-19-2009, 09:21 AM
It's a silly saying because it's often used to mean that all the outs in the inning were strikeouts no matter what else happened. Here's an example from the writeup of last night's game (at the end of the recap):

http://www.kansascity.com/485/story/1332942.html

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 12:42 PM
It's a silly saying because it's often used to mean that all the outs in the inning were strikeouts no matter what else happened. Here's an example from the writeup of last night's game (at the end of the recap):

http://www.kansascity.com/485/story/1332942.html

I think people are just flat wrong if they consider that striking out the "side." Again, the word "side" implies the entire other team (and for a particular inning, every batter you face would be the side -- not just the ones you have success against).

Tony Cloninger
07-19-2009, 01:39 PM
Let's discuss how excited George becomes when someone moves a runner over from 2nd to 3rd with 1 out. ;)

Brutus
07-19-2009, 02:04 PM
I think people are just flat wrong if they consider that striking out the "side." Again, the word "side" implies the entire other team (and for a particular inning, every batter you face would be the side -- not just the ones you have success against).

This is how the "side" is listed on Wikipeida:

side retired

When the third out of an inning is called, the "side is retired" and the other team takes its turn at bat. A pitcher or a defensive team can be said to have "retired the side." The goal of any pitcher is to face just three batters and make three outs: to "retire the side in order," have a "one-two-three inning," or have "three up, three down."

Note how, at least on there, the side is differentiated as being retired and being retired in order. So it stands to reason that by striking out the side, it does not have to be in order - at least in context of how it's defined there.

Point is, I don't know that there is a right or wrong answer here, but many people believe the "side" to be three outs in an inning. Accordingly, they would be correct in their usage with that perception of the term.

BCubb2003
07-19-2009, 02:24 PM
There's wrong and there's Doesn't make sense but people have been saying it for years. I've called "Striking out the side" the biggest lie in baseball. So I'm willing to join Blitz's campaign to eradicate it. If side meant outs, then side retired would be redundant. Side means the other team, the other side, or at least, those who bat that half inning.

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 02:43 PM
There's wrong and there's Doesn't make sense but people have been saying it for years. I've called "Striking out the side" the biggest lie in baseball. So I'm willing to join Blitz's campaign to eradicate it. If side meant outs, then side retired would be redundant. Side means the other team, the other side, or at least, those who bat that half inning.

We shall take the case to the Supreme Court if that's what it takes my friend. Our country deserves better. :D

Blitz Dorsey
07-19-2009, 02:46 PM
Let's discuss how excited George becomes when someone moves a runner over from 2nd to 3rd with 1 out. ;)

Ha! That is definitely on the list of 1,000 annoying things about Grande. Runner on second, one out, batter grounds weakly to second, Reds fans groan.

"Nice job getting the job done there, advancing the runner to third."

Uh, no George. Only with zero outs is that considered getting the job done. For a guy that has been around baseball so long, Grande's "Baseball IQ" is very low IMO.