PDA

View Full Version : Players you thought were better than they really were in your younger days



savafan
07-24-2009, 11:27 PM
Looking back at the players I worshiped in my youth, I realize now that I used to really overrate players with my juvenile naivete.

I was certain that Dale Murphy was a future hall of famer. Likewise Joe Carter.

I used to wine about the Reds losing Danny Tartabull in the rule 5 draft.

I thought Shawon Dunston, Jesse Barfield and Chris Sabo were superstars.

Mark Langston seemed to me to be one of the best starting pitchers in the history of the game.

I idolized Manny Trillo and his glove.

WMR
07-24-2009, 11:28 PM
Deion Sanders. Hahaha.

BuckeyeRedleg
07-24-2009, 11:36 PM
Eddie Milner.

One of the first players I idolized, as a youngster.

I used to play CF and try to walk and run like him and, even though I was a righty and he was lefty, I'd hold my glove like him*.

Eddie had some pop in his bat and could steal. He was a poor man's Eric Davis, who would eventually become my favorite player ever.


*he barely had his fingers tucked into his glove and it looked like his glove was going to slip off, but it looked cool.

1st little league batting stance: George Foster.
1st little league number: 5 (for Johnny Bench).
Tried to play OF like: Eddie Milner.

reds44
07-24-2009, 11:40 PM
Edwin Encarnacion?

Unassisted
07-24-2009, 11:43 PM
Brad Lesley. With the splash he made on his debut in '82, I figured "The Animal" was destined to anchor the bullpen for years.

George Anderson
07-24-2009, 11:43 PM
Gary Redus...but then again during that era of the early 80's he had to look awfully good.

savafan
07-24-2009, 11:44 PM
I also used to think Vince Coleman would be the next Rickey Henderson or Lou Brock.

Team Clark
07-24-2009, 11:44 PM
Tracy Jones. Sad, I know. I even got to know him which was even better.

BTW, Tartabull was pretty darn good.

I also liked Mike Heath and Mark Carreon. Big Dale Murphy fan.

savafan
07-24-2009, 11:47 PM
Big Dale Murphy fan.

I sent Dale Murphy a baseball card to autograph, along with a letter, back when he was with the Braves back when I was in junior high. I had always heard he was an impossible autograph to get.

9 years later, graduated from high school and moved out of my parents' house, I was suprised when my mom told me they had gotten mail for me from Dale Murphy. I got the card back, signed and in perfect condition, 9 years after I sent it.

cincrazy
07-24-2009, 11:48 PM
This is a great thread.

I'd have to go with Aaron Boone. While he certainly carved out a fairly nice career for himself, I was convinced that he was Mike Schmidt part 2.

Cedric
07-24-2009, 11:49 PM
Dale Murphy was THAT good.

Eddie Milner. And how about Kal Daniels.

Brutus
07-24-2009, 11:49 PM
Looking back at the players I worshiped in my youth, I realize now that I used to really overrate players with my juvenile naivete.

I was certain that Dale Murphy was a future hall of famer. Likewise Joe Carter.

I used to wine about the Reds losing Danny Tartabull in the rule 5 draft.

I thought Shawon Dunston, Jesse Barfield and Chris Sabo were superstars.

Mark Langston seemed to me to be one of the best starting pitchers in the history of the game.

I idolized Manny Trillo and his glove.

I like this question a lot. It's a neat question, I think.

I grew up in the 80's and really started following baseball as a kid right around 1989 (though the 1990 season was the first I followed avidly).

So my answers would be limited to the past 20 seasons.

I really thought Hal Morris was capable of putting on hitting clinics. I thought Orestes Destrade was underrated. Always thought Niger Wilson never got a fair shake. And at the other end of the spectrum, I strangely used to think Edgar Martinez was way overrated.

Cedric
07-24-2009, 11:51 PM
I thought Todd Walker was going to be good. Also thought that Preston Wilson had a chance to be a star.

savafan
07-24-2009, 11:52 PM
Dale Murphy was THAT good.



Yeah, but if I remember correctly, I think he really tailed off at the end of his career which put a hurt on his overall career numbers.

savafan
07-24-2009, 11:59 PM
Tracy Jones. Sad, I know. I even got to know him which was even better.



My very first baseball card was a 1987 Topps Tracy Jones rookie card. I think I had about 70 of them by the time it was all said and done.


Also, going off of my card collecting days, I remembering thinking Gregg Jefferies of the Mets would be the next big superstar in the game. Came up around the same time as Ken Griffey Jr. and Gary Sheffield. Flamed out a lot more quickly.

Col_ IN Reds fan
07-25-2009, 12:10 AM
Not sure if this is what you are after but I thought Paul Householder and Duane Walker could be able to anchor the outfield for a long time. I think Walker had 2 HR's against Nolan Ryan in a game.

Spitball
07-25-2009, 12:14 AM
Frank Pastore and Bruce Berenyi both had me fooled.

VR
07-25-2009, 12:15 AM
Sean Casey was going to be winning batting titles.

Clint Hurdle

Ben McDonald



Sparky would tell you Chris Pittaro and Torey Lovullo ;)

919191
07-25-2009, 01:21 AM
I thought Dusty Baker was one of the great players in the game. Maybe the stats don't back it up, but it always seemed to me he was a Reds Killer.

macro
07-25-2009, 01:28 AM
Nick Esasky
Omar Moreno

BuckeyeRedleg
07-25-2009, 01:31 AM
I also invested in 100 Rolando Roomes rookie cards in 1989 (Donruss).

GoReds33
07-25-2009, 03:15 AM
It's Juan Pierre for me. I just loved that bunt. I'm still not old by any means, but he can sure as heck bunt.

Homer Bailey
07-25-2009, 03:31 AM
Edwin Encarnacion?

You are still very much on the Edwin train. You might be his biggest supporter.

And that right there defines the state of the Reds. The biggest supporter of EE admits that he is not nearly as good as he thought he was, but he still defends him to the death, because the players around him are not even worth mentioning, and he feels that EE is worth defending.

(Reds44 this is absolutely not a rip on you, just a rip on management in general, and how they have caused us to have such low standards.

reds44
07-25-2009, 03:32 AM
You are still very much on the Edwin train. You might be his biggest supporter.

And that right there defines the state of the Reds. The biggest supporter of EE admits that he is not nearly as good as he thought he was, but he still defends him to the death, because the players around him are not even worth mentioning, and he feels that EE is worth defending.

(Reds44 this is absolutely not a rip on you, just a rip on management in general, and how they have caused us to have such low standards.
All I ask is that we find somebody who is actually better than him before we try to replace him.

And yes, he's probably my favorite Red currently.

MrCinatit
07-25-2009, 03:42 AM
Kal Daniels. I still find myself surprised at myself when I realize that he was not with the 1990 team.
Rick Mahler was the greatest pitcher who ever lived. When he faced the Reds (at least it seemed whenever I listened to the game). Against everyone else, not so much. The same could also be said for Pascual Perez, who was always going up against Mario Soto.
Almost literally every time I saw Bob Watson at the plate, he would hit a homer. I thought he was one of the best sluggers of the game when I was a kid.
I'm always surprised to see Bill Madlock did not put up more spectacular numbers. Same goes for Bill Buckner.

Homer Bailey
07-25-2009, 03:43 AM
All I ask is that we find somebody who is actually better than him before we try to replace him.

And yes, he's probably my favorite Red currently.

I agree completely. I think Frazier can be that guy. However, I'm a guy that is obsessed with a guy that doesn't fit a convential mode. I love a guy who can hit .320 but is a doubles hitter rather than home run hitter. I think if you stack your lineup full of those guys, you are bound to win. Guys that can string together hits are a huge key. I feel like the best offenses are the ones that can get 4 base hits in a row, and score runs that way.

EE doesn't need to be replaced. However, I don't think our O should be dependent on him in the least bit. If we GO FOR IT and our lineup reads like this next year:

Dickerson/Stubbs/Heisey/Owings/Cordero/Arroyo CF (Ok the last 3 were kidding, but basically anyone but WT)
Escobar
Votto
Holliday
Bruce
Phillips
EdE
Hanigan
P


So that lineup will cost us Alonso no doubt. Will cost us one of Dickerson/Heisey/Stubbs. That's fine. We sign Holliday to 5 yr $75 (will never happen, which is why I hate myself for this dream). We have Gomes off the bench for sure. Maybe Nix. Maybe one of the CF's.

I don't mind an Alonso package for Escoobar. It fills a huge need. I think Cozart will make an above average MLB player, which will mean in 2 years we will have an SS to deal at the MLB level, which could be of huge value.


As much as I enjoy betting against and laughing at the 2009 Reds, I think that without one particular manager, and with some thoughtful GM moves, this team really isn't that far away.


(Dusty, Dick Pole, and Jacoby need to go, and LaRussa/Duncan, and whoever need to come in. I realize that many don't like LaRussa, but he brings some real professionalism that Dusty doesn't even come close to, IMO.)

Razor Shines
07-25-2009, 03:59 AM
When I was very young: Razor Shines.

He was mentioned but I thought that Gregg Jefferies was going to be awesome. I always thought that Glenn Braggs would get it together.

RANDY IN INDY
07-25-2009, 09:11 AM
Tommy Helms
Bobby Tolan
Jim Merritt
George Culver (after he threw his no-hitter)
Tommy Harper
Leo Cardenas

redsmetz
07-25-2009, 09:32 AM
I was certain that Dale Murphy was a future hall of famer.

Many would argue that Murphy should be a HOF'er. On baseball-reference.com, his HOF statistics at the bottom, having him exceeding the HOF average in three of the four categories (he falls short on the HOF standards measure) and his comparable players has two HOF'ers (Bench & Snider), as well as two others that many suggest are also Hall of Famers (Hodges & Santo). While clearly he ended up not "certain," he is borderline and may yet still be one, although the Vets committee seems disinclined to add anyone.

hebroncougar
07-25-2009, 09:46 AM
I thought Dusty Baker was one of the great players in the game. Maybe the stats don't back it up, but it always seemed to me he was a Reds Killer.

He still is! :D

This is a tremendous thread. For me, players in the early to mid 80's: Eddie Milner, Kal Daniels, Ron Robinson, Dan Driessen, Joe Price were all guys I thought would certainly lead the Reds to their next World Series title. On other teams, guys that stand out to me were Glenn Davis (Astros), Kevin Bass (Astros), Pedro Guerrero (Dodgers), Carmelo Martinez (Padres) were all guys in the Reds division that stick out to me.

Forgot one from my really young days: Ron Cey seemed to brutalize the Reds.

traderumor
07-25-2009, 09:55 AM
Freddie Norman, Bob Horner

Danny Serafini
07-25-2009, 10:30 AM
Leo Garcia - since he was constantly being called up I figured he must be some sort of supersub the Reds would bring in when there were problems and he would get things straightened out. Of course I wasn't factoring in that he was also constantly being sent back down. I had a similar feeling about Freddie Benavides, the Reds were fools for letting him get away! :laugh:

redsfan30
07-25-2009, 10:39 AM
I was sure Brandon Claussen was going to develop into an ace.

Joseph
07-25-2009, 10:43 AM
Tim Pugh

Wade Rowdon

Kurt Stillwell

I'd say Eric Davis because I thought he was going to be the best ever, and truth be told he could have been a hall of famer had his body not failed him. I remember when we was almost 40/40 [when that was a huge deal] and heard all the comparisons to Willie Mays and I just knew he was something else. He's still one of my two favorite all time Reds I do believe.

GradyHatton
07-25-2009, 10:44 AM
Grady Hatton, which I guess is obvious.

Later, Billy McCool, who was jacked around from starting to closing to middle relief. All-Star one year.

Later yet, Paul Moskau, who I thought was destined to be the next Tom Seaver.

Dale Murphy, along with Andre Dawson should be in the HOF and in fact they are in my HOF.

BCubb2003
07-25-2009, 10:45 AM
I guess each one of us should list Austin Kearns.

Mainspark
07-25-2009, 11:10 AM
While Jim Bowden wasn't yet on the scene to proclaim him as such, Cesar Cedeno was a true "five-tool" outfielder when he came up with the Astros in the early 1970s, and there were predictions he would become the next Willie Mays.
He never quite reached that level, though, but when the Reds traded Ray Knight for Cedeno after the 1981 season, I somehow convinced myself that he would finally reach his potential in Cincinnati.
Didn't happen.
The Reds front office had many fans convinced that Dan Driessen was a Hall of Famer in waiting when he was a reserve on the Big Red Machine teams.
After the team finally traded a real Hall of Famer in Tony Perez to accomodate playing Driessen daily at first base, he put together a decent first season as a regular, in 1977 - .300, 31 stolen bases, 91 RBI.
Things went down from there, however.
And while I wasn't on this bandwagon, I had friends who were convinced that third baseman Willie Greene was going to accomplish great things for the Reds.

Sabo Fan
07-25-2009, 11:13 AM
I thought Shawon Dunston, Jesse Barfield and Chris Sabo were superstars.

What do you mean you thought Chris Sabo was a superstar? There's no thinking about it.

All kidding aside though, I really like this topic. It's interesting because growing up we all tend to overrate guys who for whatever reasons are our favorites. The flip side is that I imagine as I get older there won't be many players who I see that will live up to my standards as I compare them to guys I saw in the past.

Redmachine2003
07-25-2009, 11:19 AM
Kearns and Dunn I thought we had the franchised turned around with these two. Chris Sabo old spuds mckinsey him self, Reggie Sanders, Eddie Miller, Tuna Boat Armstrong and about every you kid the Reds brought up over the last 25 years. It has been a very long dry spell since Eric Davis and Jose Rijo.

Tom Servo
07-25-2009, 11:23 AM
I was sure Brandon Claussen was going to develop into an ace.
Same.

Ltlabner
07-25-2009, 11:26 AM
Claudel Washington
Willie Crawford
Jerry Mumphries

Hoosier Red
07-25-2009, 11:33 AM
Jerome Walton was unbelieveable his rookie year.

Hap
07-25-2009, 11:41 AM
Jeff Branson

Scrap Irony
07-25-2009, 01:35 PM
Talk about killing the Reds-- Claudell Washigton just murdered Red pitching. I didn't just have one guy I thought would be a sure-fire All-Star, I had a whole team:

C Joe Nolan
The first of the guy that tried moving Bench off catcher. He was a good back-up for a season, then fell off a cliff. (As most back-up catchers do. He also wore glasses and I thought that was extra cool.

1B Sean Casey
He was okay, but I thought he'd be a perennial All-Star, with an OPS around 900 each year while battling for a batting crown.

2B Ron Oester
Again, not bad, but not as good as I thought he was. Played an extraordinarily long time despite having only one tool.

SS Kurt Stillwell
The Reds were nuts to let him go to KC for Danny Jackson, a crappy pitcher if ever there was one. Oops.

3B Wayne Krenchikki
Took over at the hot corner and hit 300 for awhile. Plus, he had double K's in his name. That was cool.

LF Kal Daniels
Thought he'd be a batting champion who hit 30 homers and 40 doubles a year. Knew he had an attitude, but was sure he was better than Davis or Jones One out of two isn't that bad, right?

CF Gary Redus
Hit 400 in Billings and destroyed minor league pitching. Had power and speed, could play the OF well, too. Got seriously jacked around in the minor leagues. Still had a better than average career.

RF Champ Summers
The first of my prospect myopians, I thought Summers would re-write the record books. He wasn't bad for the Tigers.

RedsBaron
07-25-2009, 01:58 PM
Dale Murphy played at a HOF level from 1982 through 1987, but his career then fell off a cliff.
I still think that Kal Daniels had superstar talent as a hitter, but he couldn't stay healthy. Of course, you could say the same for Eric Davis.
Frank Pastore really fooled me. In the latter part of 1979 and during much of 1980 he looked as if he would develop into Tom Seaver, Jr.
Wayne Simpson looked like Bob Gibson, Jr. for the first half of 1970.
Bobby Tolan looked like a superstar in 1969-70.
Back in the 1970s I echoed Sparky in thinking that Don Gullett was destined for Cooperstown.
Adam Dunn was underappreciated, but I expected him to be even better than he was.
Fred Lynn looked so great in 1975 and 1979, just a terrific all around talent, but he too couldn't stay healthy.
Dean Chance went 20-9 with a 1.65 ERA and eleven shutouts in 1964, but HOF did not await him.

Ravenlord
07-25-2009, 06:09 PM
Mell Hall, Shane Mack, Thomas Howard, Dwight Smith, Steve Bucehelle, Brandon Claussen, Wily Mo Pena, Kal Daniels, Lenny Harris, Cliff Floyd, Orlando Merced, Jeff King (even though he had a couple great years), Joe Carter, Jeff Branson, Juan Samuel, Dernell Stenson (RIP), Rob Stratton, Steve Smitherman, Kip Wells, John Roper, Jarred Fernandez, Roberto Petagine, Tuffy Rhodes, Kaz Matsui, Miguel Olivo...

westofyou
07-25-2009, 06:44 PM
Jason Thompson
Oscar Gamble
Mickey Rivers
Rennie Stennett
Bill Robinson
Enos Cabell

savafan
07-29-2009, 12:27 PM
I'll add that Don Robinson of the Giants always seemed like a great pitcher to me, because whenever I saw a game, he seemed like he owned the Reds. Same with Steve Bedrosian and Rick Reuschel

Benihana
07-29-2009, 12:40 PM
Jeff Treadway. I actually called Murray Cook out a couple years later at a charity function for trading him.

Highlifeman21
07-29-2009, 12:50 PM
Ben Broussard
Chris Denorfia
Ryan Wagner
Rob Bell
Josh Hall

That should cover it for now

bucksfan2
07-29-2009, 01:37 PM
Jose Acevedo
Anderson Machado
Luke Hudson
Rey Olmado
Oh wait, that wasn't me, that was a previous GM.

Dan
07-29-2009, 01:41 PM
I was vehemenently upset when the Reds traded Kurt Stillwell in favor of keeping Larkin.

M2
07-29-2009, 01:57 PM
Cesar Geronimo - Amazing defender, but (outside of 1976) never much of threat at the plate.

RON OESTER! - In retrospect he was a fairly lousy player.

Ellis Valentine - Never met a pitch he didn't like and his career was effectively over by age 26.

Tony Armas - He hit homers and drove in runs and had a big arm. That makes him a star, right? Wrong, he was an out machine and a horror show in the field. It took me until 1986 to figure out what a clown he actually was.

On the flip side, Pedro Borbon does not get nearly enough love.

RichRed
07-29-2009, 02:19 PM
I bought the Steve Garvey hype when I was a youngster.

And how about that Billy Joe Robidoux? Hard to believe he was born in Mass. and not Nawlins.

For the Reds, Gary Redus and Mike LaCoss.

M2
07-29-2009, 02:21 PM
I bought the Steve Garvey hype when I was a youngster.

And how about that Billy Joe Robidoux? Hard to believe he was born in Mass. and not Nawlins.

For the Reds, Gary Redus and Mike LaCoss.

Oh yeah, Mike LaCoss for me too.

Johnny Footstool
07-29-2009, 02:32 PM
U.L. Washington. That toothpick had me fooled.

Garry Templeton. I thought the Padres and Cardinals made a pretty even swap.

Bill Doran. I thought he and Larkin were going to be the Reds equivalent of Molitor and Yount.

MikeS21
07-29-2009, 03:03 PM
Cesar Geronimo - Amazing defender, but (outside of 1976) never much of threat at the plate.

Geronimo was my choice.

Others who disappointed: Paul Householder, Gary Redus, Manny Sarmiento, and Willie Green.

membengal
07-29-2009, 03:19 PM
Dan Driessan. To a 7 - 9 year old, Dan Driessan.

RichRed
07-29-2009, 03:25 PM
Garry Templeton. I thought the Padres and Cardinals made a pretty even swap.


That's a good one. I think a lot of people thought that was an even trade at the time.

I remember thinking Jay Tibbs was headed for big things after that 6-2, 2.86 rookie season in '84.

TRF
07-29-2009, 03:46 PM
Gary Redus for me. Kal Daniels would have been a star had he human knees. Reggie Jefferson, I remember when he went to the Indians via some paper work snafu.

I thought Mo Sanford was a star.

Playadlc
07-29-2009, 05:26 PM
Closing pitchers.

When I was young I used to think that all closing pitchers were awesome. It's simply not true. Any good starting pitcher would make a great closer. Could you imagine if Randy Johnson only threw 1 inning a game for his career and faced a majority of left-handed hitters? He'd be the most dominating closer ever.

Rojo
07-29-2009, 05:56 PM
Alan Ashby, probably because he was a switch-hitting catcher. He was nothing special behind the plate and only had two decent seasons standing next to it.

Todd Benzinger, another switch-hitter. Crossed my eyes and saw Eddie Murray, had fewer hits then Eddie Murphy.

Special consideration: I never understood why Will Cordero got GMs moist. He was to baseball what Seth Rogan is to comedy.

savafan
07-29-2009, 06:26 PM
I think I'll throw Eric Karros and Raul Mondesi into this group as well. Thought they would lead the Dodgers to the promised land.

Benihana
07-29-2009, 06:27 PM
I think I'll throw Eric Karros and Raul Mondesi into this group as well. Thought they would lead the Dodgers to the promised land.

With those two and Hollandsworth, didn't the Dodgers have three consecutive ROYs? That's pretty impressive.

Remember when the Cubs had Dwight Smith and Jerome Walton?

savafan
07-29-2009, 06:32 PM
With those two and Hollandsworth, didn't the Dodgers have three consecutive ROYs? That's pretty impressive.

Remember when the Cubs had Dwight Smith and Jerome Walton?

http://mlb.mlb.com/la/history/timeline11.jsp

During the 1990s, the Dodgers set a record with five consecutive National League Rookies of the Year: Eric Karros (1992), Mike Piazza (1993), Raul Mondesi (1994), Hideo Nomo (1995) and Todd Hollandsworth (1996)

Benihana
07-29-2009, 06:38 PM
http://mlb.mlb.com/la/history/timeline11.jsp

During the 1990s, the Dodgers set a record with five consecutive National League Rookies of the Year: Eric Karros (1992), Mike Piazza (1993), Raul Mondesi (1994), Hideo Nomo (1995) and Todd Hollandsworth (1996)

Wow. Didn't realize it was FIVE in a row- even more impressive. Funny thing is, only Piazza really became a great player. Such is the case with ROYs.

Rojo
07-29-2009, 06:40 PM
Wow. Didn't realize it was FIVE in a row- even more impressive. Funny thing is, only Piazza really became a great player. Such is the case with ROYs.


Goes to show ya', a great system is a starting point, not an end-goal.

Big Klu
07-31-2009, 12:54 PM
http://mlb.mlb.com/la/history/timeline11.jsp

During the 1990s, the Dodgers set a record with five consecutive National League Rookies of the Year: Eric Karros (1992), Mike Piazza (1993), Raul Mondesi (1994), Hideo Nomo (1995) and Todd Hollandsworth (1996)

The Dodgers broke their own record with that streak. The previous record of four NL ROY's:

Rick Sutcliffe (1979)
Steve Howe (1980)
Fernando Valenzuela (1981)
Steve Sax (1982)

TRF
07-31-2009, 12:57 PM
Nomo was pretty great. Really was the guy holding the door open for Japanese players, and had seasons where he was just dominant.

Karros, I never really liked.

traderumor
07-31-2009, 01:08 PM
Steve Balboni, Omar Moreno, Frank Taveras, Cesar Cedeno, Willie McGee, Leon Durham, Howard Johnson, Doug Rau, John Montefusco, Vince Coleman

M2
07-31-2009, 01:19 PM
Steve Balboni, Omar Moreno, Frank Taveras, Cesar Cedeno, Willie McGee, Leon Durham, Howard Johnson, Doug Rau, John Montefusco, Vince Coleman

Imaginary rep for the Doug Rau reference.

Was he in every Topps pack in the mid-1970s? Seemed like it. Him and Bob Apodaca.

Anyway, Rau was pretty good. Soft tossing lefty and Dodger Stadium definitely did him a lot of favors, but he has a solid five-year until his arm blew up. He was one of five Dodgers starters with 200+ IP and a sub-4.00 ERA in 1977. We'll may never see anything like that again.

corkedbat
07-31-2009, 01:21 PM
"Wily Taveras" - Walt Jocketty

ochre
07-31-2009, 01:27 PM
Dann Bilardello. I was pretty naive, and it's not like I thought he was particularly good, but he still managed to underwhelm.
:)

traderumor
07-31-2009, 01:28 PM
Dann Bilardello. I was pretty naive, and it's not like I thought he was particularly good, but he still managed to underwhelm.
:)It was the two "n's" that attracted you.

M2
07-31-2009, 01:34 PM
It was the two "n's" that attracted you.

The two "n's" were a major attraction. Plus, if you breezed quickly over his name your eyes could trick you into thinking his name was Damn Bilardello.

corkedbat
07-31-2009, 01:37 PM
The two "n's" were a major attraction. Plus, if you breezed quickly over his name your eyes could trick you into thinking his name was Damn Bilardello.

He was called that on more than one occasion :D

traderumor
07-31-2009, 01:43 PM
Then there is Steve Christmas, which I was sure would make it with a name like that. I always wondered who Joaquin Andujar was when he showed up on the yearbook roster for several years but never made it up, then showed up all of a sudden on the Astros and was a pretty good pitcher.

cumberlandreds
07-31-2009, 02:44 PM
With those two and Hollandsworth, didn't the Dodgers have three consecutive ROYs? That's pretty impressive.

Remember when the Cubs had Dwight Smith and Jerome Walton?

I remember both of those Cubs. I really thought Smith would be very good.
Kal Daniels was the Red I thought was really good but turned bust.
Also Shawn Abner and Greg Jefferies I thought would be stars but were klunkers.

mth123
07-31-2009, 08:40 PM
Scott Rolen at age 34.

Big Klu
07-31-2009, 10:48 PM
Dann Bilardello. I was pretty naive, and it's not like I thought he was particularly good, but he still managed to underwhelm.
:)

Still, he got hosed by Vern Rapp, who persisted in playing Brad Gulden (who was even worse).

George Anderson
07-31-2009, 11:03 PM
Dann Bilardello. I was pretty naive, and it's not like I thought he was particularly good, but he still managed to underwhelm.
:)

Bilardello has a son in the minors.


http://www.steeplecats.com/bio_a.php?player=56

cincinnati chili
08-01-2009, 02:42 AM
RON OESTER! - In retrospect he was a fairly lousy player.


That was my top choice. In a few years, late-blooming Pirate fans will say the same thing about Jack Wilson.

Several of the post-Bench catchers tricked my naive self into thinking they'd be something relevant:

Joe Nolan
Brad Gulden
Alex Trevino (after all, dude had the same jersey # as George Foster)

cincinnati chili
08-01-2009, 02:44 AM
Bilardello has a son in the minors.


http://www.steeplecats.com/bio_a.php?player=56

Let me guess his name.

Jonn?

Fredd?

Biffff?

Big Klu
08-01-2009, 02:49 AM
That was my top choice. In a few years, late-blooming Pirate fans will say the same thing about Jack Wilson.

Several of the post-Bench catchers tricked my naive self into thinking they'd be something relevant:

Joe Nolan
Brad Gulden
Alex Trevino (after all, dude had the same jersey # as George Foster)

Alex Treviņo wore #29. (He also wore #8 in his second stint with the Reds in 1990.)

StillFunkyB
08-01-2009, 05:02 AM
Candy Maldonado, Carlos Martinez, Mark Whiten, Glenallen Hill, Gregg Jefferies, Kevin Maas, Reggie Jefferson, Scott Pose, Bernard Gilkey.....that's all I can think of off the top of my head.

edit...just thought of one more... Charles Nagy.

cincinnati chili
08-02-2009, 01:29 AM
Alex Treviņo wore #29. (He also wore #8 in his second stint with the Reds in 1990.)

whoops. me incorrect. you correct. Memory playing tricks on me.

Anyway, he was traded for Foster, along with others, and I assumed as a kid that meant he was just awesome.

savafan
08-02-2009, 06:33 PM
I always thought Andres Galarraga and Hubie Brooks were great players with the Expos. I guess they were good to decent players, but not exactly great.

Same thing with Andy Van Slyke, Mark Davis, Oil Can Boyd and Tom Brunansky

Big Klu
08-02-2009, 06:41 PM
whoops. me incorrect. you correct. Memory playing tricks on me.

Anyway, he was traded for Foster, along with others, and I assumed as a kid that meant he was just awesome.

In retrospect, Wagner (who I can't stand) sold Foster at the right time, as George deteriorated rapidly, and never regained his hitting prowess of 1975-81. But the return he got was horrible--Jim Kern, Greg Harris, and Alex Treviņo. In retrospect, the much more grievous mistake was trading Ken Griffey to the Yankees for Freddie Tolliver and Bryan Ryder, followed closely by letting Dave Collins walk via free agency. This then forced Wagner to make another questionable move to shore up the suddenly depleted OF by trading 3B Ray Knight to Houston for Cesar Cedeņo.

savafan
08-02-2009, 06:50 PM
followed closely by letting Dave Collins walk via free agency.

I was very young, but from what I remember, Collins had blazing speed. Now, I'm not sure if that was just blazing for a 7 year old, of if he really was that fast.

Big Klu
08-02-2009, 07:06 PM
I was very young, but from what I remember, Collins had blazing speed. Now, I'm not sure if that was just blazing for a 7 year old, of if he really was that fast.

No, he was pretty fast. He had 79 SB's in 100 attempts in 1980, and stole 20+ bases nine times.

Ron Madden
08-02-2009, 07:13 PM
Johnny Edwards, Deron Johnson, Mel Queen and Art Shamski.

Always Red
08-02-2009, 07:31 PM
Johnny Edwards, Deron Johnson, Mel Queen and Art Shamski.

I remember Shamsky as a Met, but not as a Red.

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/art_shamsky_autograph.jpg


http://brooklynmetfan.com/images/uploads/Shamsky.jpg

Always Red
08-02-2009, 07:37 PM
I thought Paul Householder was going to be the next Mickey Mantle.

George Anderson
08-02-2009, 07:58 PM
I thought Paul Householder was going to be the next Mickey Mantle.

So did I.

I watched him play here in Indy and had no problem with the Reds getting rid of Ken Griffey in 82' because no doubt Paul was going to be awesome.

MWM
08-02-2009, 08:39 PM
Dale Murphy is about as nice a man as you'll ever meet. I met him when I was 12 and his is the only autograph I ever got (I have Tony Gwynn, Chris Carpenter, and Josh Beckett but I didn't ask for those).

Always Red
08-02-2009, 08:41 PM
Dale Murphy is about as nice a man as you'll ever meet. I met him when I was 12 and his is the only autograph I ever got (I have Tony Gwynn, Chris Carpenter, and Josh Beckett but I didn't ask for those).

Halfway through his career, Dale Murphy was a surefire Hall of Famer.

GradyHatton
08-02-2009, 09:19 PM
The two "n's" were a major attraction.

Wonder why Donn Alvin Clendenon wasn't more popular. He led the league in "n's" from '61 thru '72. Pretty good ballplayer as well.

mth123
08-02-2009, 09:21 PM
I remember Shamsky as a Met, but not as a Red.

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/art_shamsky_autograph.jpg


http://brooklynmetfan.com/images/uploads/Shamsky.jpg

Shamsky hit the first HR I ever saw at a game in person. It was in 1966.

ochre
08-02-2009, 11:21 PM
I was in basic training for the last couple of months of the '88 season. I had limited access to media/information, had never really followed the AL particularly closely, and I hadn't really heard of Fred McGriff; needless to say, from catching random headlines, I thought Terry McGriff was really tearing it up for the last couple of months of '88.

MWM
08-03-2009, 02:00 AM
Halfway through his career, Dale Murphy was a surefire Hall of Famer.

Yep, he's a good example of peak versus longevity dilemma. He was one of the best players in the game for a several year stretch, but he had a rapid decline. Another couple of even above average years and that woulde probably push him over the top. But I doubt he gets in as it is.

cumberlandreds
08-03-2009, 08:08 AM
A couple of others that may have been mentioned already. Paul Householder was built up as the next great Red but was a total bust.
An Atlanta Brave who was built up to be a great player was Brad Komminsk. Total bust.

Always Red
08-03-2009, 08:54 AM
A couple of others that may have been mentioned already. Paul Householder was built up as the next great Red but was a total bust.
An Atlanta Brave who was built up to be a great player was Brad Komminsk. Total bust.

Brad Komminsk hit the longest home run I ever saw as an amateur, at Ohio University in the late 70's during an American Legion Tournament (off our team, of course!). High over the left field fence, across a service road and onto the roof of the gym across the service road. On it's way to the roof, the ball briefly waved hello to an "X" on the side of the wall, where Mike Schmidt had hit a HR as a student at Ohio U.

tommycash
08-03-2009, 01:53 PM
I don't know if any of these guys have been said yet, but when I was growing up I always thought John Smiley was better than he actually was. Put Scott Erickson down as a guy I thought would be an ace pitcher for a long time. Greg Swindell, Wally Joyner, Gregg Jeffries, Ron Darling, and Joe Oliver were all guys that I always loved, but didn't turn out to be greats like I thought they would when I was 10 years old.

vaticanplum
08-03-2009, 02:16 PM
Bobby Bonilla. Now, dude was a fine baseball player by any standard, but in my head he was always the Pirates Superdude he was when I was a little kid, and that just wasn't true once he left the Pirates.

Orioles fan to my left here would like to put in a vote for Joe Orsulak. Whoever that is.

RichRed
08-03-2009, 02:23 PM
Orioles fan to my left here would like to put in a vote for Joe Orsulak. Whoever that is.

He hit .300 in his first (sort of) full season with the Pirates in '85. Like your O's fan to the left there, I just assumed that meant he was good.

tommycash
08-03-2009, 10:38 PM
Bobby Bonilla. Now, dude was a fine baseball player by any standard, but in my head he was always the Pirates Superdude he was when I was a little kid, and that just wasn't true once he left the Pirates.

Orioles fan to my left here would like to put in a vote for Joe Orsulak. Whoever that is.

Put me in the same boat on Bonilla.

StillFunkyB
08-03-2009, 11:01 PM
Just thought of a couple more...

Cory Snyder, and the one and only Brook Jacoby.

I grew up an Indians fan...

RANDY IN INDY
08-04-2009, 07:54 AM
Bobby Bonilla. Now, dude was a fine baseball player by any standard, but in my head he was always the Pirates Superdude he was when I was a little kid, and that just wasn't true once he left the Pirates.

Orioles fan to my left here would like to put in a vote for Joe Orsulak. Whoever that is.

I saw Bonilla take batting practice at Riverfront and remember the sound the ball made when it came off the bat. I thought, at the time, that he was going to be very special.

Rojo
08-05-2009, 07:38 PM
Bonilla was challenged at third and most years didn't quite offer enough bat for another corner spot. Sound familiar?

Chip R
08-05-2009, 07:52 PM
An Atlanta Brave who was built up to be a great player was Brad Komminsk. Total bust.

He's managing for the Bowie Bay Sox now.

Chip R
08-05-2009, 07:53 PM
I remember Shamsky as a Met, but not as a Red.

http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pics/art_shamsky_autograph.jpg


http://brooklynmetfan.com/images/uploads/Shamsky.jpg

Nice eyebrow.

ochre
08-05-2009, 10:24 PM
Bonilla was challenged at third and most years didn't quite offer enough bat for another corner spot. Sound familiar?
Dan Driessen? :dunno:

KoryMac5
08-06-2009, 12:12 AM
For some odd reason I always thought Johnny Ruffin was something special, guess I was wrong about that.