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View Full Version : Who is one of the most underrated influential people in the history of the U. S. ?



Kingspoint
02-07-2010, 07:27 AM
This should be able to be talked about without political opinions being brought up if it's kept from strictly a historical perspective pointing out accomplishments and influential actions of the people you nominate.

camisadelgolf
02-07-2010, 09:48 AM
Have you seen Food, Inc.? It's sickening what kind of influence industrial food producers have had on Americans.

OldRightHander
02-07-2010, 11:21 AM
Ray Kroc

texasdave
02-07-2010, 12:10 PM
Eli Whitney and his cotton gin.

will5979
02-07-2010, 12:38 PM
Ronald Reagan, who was largely responsible for ending the Cold War without firing a single shot.

Also brought patriotism and a sense of normalcy back to America when it was much needed.

MWM
02-07-2010, 12:46 PM
James Otis
Eleanor Roosevelt
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Susan B Anthony
George Marshall

OldRightHander
02-07-2010, 01:18 PM
James Otis

I guess his life had its ups and downs.

jimbo
02-07-2010, 01:21 PM
Wilbur and Orville Wright.

Falls City Beer
02-07-2010, 02:10 PM
Slayer

hebroncougar
02-07-2010, 02:19 PM
Henry Clay played a major, major role in early 19th century politics and is often overlooked because he was never President.

westofyou
02-07-2010, 02:55 PM
Tony the Tiger
Barbie
Robert James Keeshan

BCubb2003
02-07-2010, 03:30 PM
Willis Carrier.

LoganBuck
02-07-2010, 04:52 PM
Jeff Probst

Now every moron thinks they can be a star.

Blimpie
02-07-2010, 05:09 PM
Steve Jobs
Bill Gates

chicoruiz
02-07-2010, 05:11 PM
Philo Farnsworth

savafan
02-07-2010, 05:29 PM
Leonardo da Vinci. Not that he's not appreciated, but not nearly as appreciated as he should be for all that he did.

RichRed
02-07-2010, 05:33 PM
Clair Patterson, geologist. Helped save countless lives with his tireless work studying the dangers of lead and battling against the powerful lead industry.

http://www.iptv.org/iowapathways/mypath.cfm?ounid=ob_000330

Oxblood
02-07-2010, 05:36 PM
Babe Ruth

MWM
02-07-2010, 08:10 PM
Can't forget about Tim Tebow. He's obviously one of the most influential americans of all time. :evil:

Dom Heffner
02-07-2010, 08:55 PM
Ronald Reagan is not underrated. He's the opposite.

Chip R
02-07-2010, 09:18 PM
Slayer

Buffy?

Falls City Beer
02-07-2010, 09:21 PM
Buffy?

I wish. I actually had the thrash metal band in mind, but Sarah Michelle Gellar will do.

RedsBaron
02-07-2010, 09:34 PM
Ronald Reagan is not underrated. He's the opposite.

I halfway agree with that: Conservative Republicans almost certainly overrate Reagan. However liberal Democrats also underrate Reagan.
Underrated Americans would probably include a host of inventors and innovators that have been forgotten.
U.S. Grant is still arguably underappreciated as a military strategist.
George P. Shultz ably filled a variety of cabinet positions in several administrations but had little publicity even while in office and has been forgotten.

IslandRed
02-07-2010, 11:12 PM
Whoever the guy was who invented air conditioning. It completely changed the population migration patterns in the U.S.

will5979
02-08-2010, 12:04 AM
Leonardo da Vinci. Not that he's not appreciated, but not nearly as appreciated as he should be for all that he did.

I thought this thread was for U.S. history? :dunno:

BCubb2003
02-08-2010, 12:40 AM
Whoever the guy was who invented air conditioning. It completely changed the population migration patterns in the U.S.

See my post above about Willis Carrier.

Kingspoint
02-08-2010, 12:42 AM
For me, it's John Fremont and John Adams.

MWM
02-08-2010, 12:46 AM
I wouldn't say John Adams' influence is under-appreciated.

durl
02-08-2010, 01:01 AM
Most influential in a bad way: Rachel Carson. She successfully demonized DDT until it was banned in 1972. It's estimated that over 50 million people died from malaria after DDT was banned. It was extremely effective and quite safe.

Most influential in a good way: tough one. I'll have to think about that one more.

LoganBuck
02-08-2010, 01:07 AM
Cyrus McCormick

cincinnati chili
02-08-2010, 01:27 AM
City planners in a lot of major cities, for good and for bad. Robert Moses being a big one. More influential than any mayor in the history of NYC.

Screwball
02-08-2010, 01:29 AM
George Washington Carver

savafan
02-08-2010, 01:35 AM
I thought this thread was for U.S. history? :dunno:

Yes, and the invention of scissors, the parachute, anatomical discoveries, etc. all are important to US history. ;)

As for just US history, I nominate James Longstreet for his innovative military strategies that didn't receive proper notice until much later wars. Also Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, one of my personal heroes.

Also, Benjamin Franklin. Many people have no idea what all he did in his life short of "discovering" electricity and being a founding father.

RedsBaron
02-08-2010, 07:45 AM
City planners in a lot of major cities, for good and for bad. Robert Moses being a big one. More influential than any mayor in the history of NYC.

Have other cities had urban planners as powerful as Robert Moses?
If not for Moses, the Brooklyn Dodgers would still exist, as Walter O'Malley tried to build a new ballpark in Brooklyn but Moses would not let O'Malley do so. Had the Dodgers remained in Brooklyn, major league basebal would still have eventually expanded to the west coast, but the game's history would have been altered. Would the Giants have still moved to San Francisco without the Dodgers going to LA, or would the Giants instead have moved to Minnesota? With the Dodgers remaining in Brooklyn, would the Yankees still have achieved such dominance in the New York market?

919191
02-08-2010, 09:01 AM
Eugene V Debs

919191
02-08-2010, 09:02 AM
Let's not forget Boss and GIK.:)

Roy Tucker
02-08-2010, 09:03 AM
Robert J. Bulkley

proposed the interstate highways back in 1938

bucksfan2
02-08-2010, 09:39 AM
In my lifetime it was Reagan.

Time will tell but I think 10 years from now Bernanke may just be on that list.

RedsBaron
02-08-2010, 09:51 AM
There was a Chinese leader, I believe it was Chou En Lai, who, when asked his opinion regarding the effects of the French Revolution, replied that it was "too early to tell" even though the French Revolution had by then occurred nearly 200 years previously. I mention this because it is probably difficult for any of us to accurately assess the effects of most of the leaders during our lifetime.

RichRed
02-08-2010, 10:27 AM
I halfway agree with that: Conservative Republicans almost certainly overrate Reagan. However liberal Democrats also underrate Reagan.


Righties think Reagan hung the moon; lefties think he was a nightmare. Either way, the last thing Reagan is, is underrated. I think if you have an international airport named after you, you're disqualified from the list.

nineworldseries
02-08-2010, 10:33 AM
Ron Santo (at least according to him)

But in all seriousness - Booker T. Washington

Falls City Beer
02-08-2010, 10:41 AM
Most influential in a bad way: Rachel Carson. She successfully demonized DDT until it was banned in 1972. It's estimated that over 50 million people died from malaria after DDT was banned. It was extremely effective and quite safe.

Most influential in a good way: tough one. I'll have to think about that one more.

DDT is effective, but it's not safe. Nevertheless, in a place like Africa, I'd say its use in fighting malaria outweighs its dangers.

westofyou
02-08-2010, 11:04 AM
In my lifetime it was Reagan.

Time will tell but I think 10 years from now Bernanke may just be on that list.

Underrated people don't have mountains named after them.

http://www.kcbs.com/pages/6260506.php?

George Anderson
02-08-2010, 11:47 AM
Limbaugh

durl
02-08-2010, 12:16 PM
DDT is effective, but it's not safe. Nevertheless, in a place like Africa, I'd say its use in fighting malaria outweighs its dangers.

It's dangers were incredibly overblown. It's quite safe.

http://dwb4.unl.edu/Chem/CHEM869E/CHEM869ELinks/www.altgreen.com.au/Chemicals/ddt.html

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2428/was-rachel-carson-a-fraud-and-is-ddt-actually-safe-for-humans

http://www.junkscience.com/ddtfaq.html

Simply put, many of the allegations made by Carson were tremendously overblown or flat-out wrong. And tens of millions of people died as a result.

bucksfan2
02-08-2010, 12:18 PM
It's dangers were incredibly overblown. It's quite safe.

http://dwb4.unl.edu/Chem/CHEM869E/CHEM869ELinks/www.altgreen.com.au/Chemicals/ddt.html

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2428/was-rachel-carson-a-fraud-and-is-ddt-actually-safe-for-humans

http://www.junkscience.com/ddtfaq.html

Simply put, many of the allegations made by Carson were tremendously overblown or flat-out wrong. And tens of millions of people died as a result.

Correct me if I am wrong, but didn't DDT do a good job of killing bed bugs? Bed bugs are awful to deal with for anyone who has come in contact with them.

15fan
02-08-2010, 12:53 PM
Robert Oppenheimer

Hugh Hefner

Jim Henson

KoryMac5
02-08-2010, 02:13 PM
Defense Sec. Robert Gates

Rojo
02-08-2010, 02:45 PM
Ralph Nader

George Kennan

William Levitt

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levittown,_New_York

klw
02-08-2010, 02:48 PM
I was just thinking of Leavitt. Good call.

durl
02-08-2010, 02:49 PM
Correct me if I am wrong, but didn't DDT do a good job of killing bed bugs? Bed bugs are awful to deal with for anyone who has come in contact with them.

Yes, DDT kills bed bugs. And a lot of other pests, too.

paintmered
02-08-2010, 04:24 PM
Underrated people don't have mountains named after them.

http://www.kcbs.com/pages/6260506.php?

All presidents, for that matter, shouldn't be on this list.

Falls City Beer
02-08-2010, 04:35 PM
Yes, DDT kills bed bugs. And a lot of other pests, too.

It isn't horribly harmful to mammals in small doses, but it has a good many ecological effects, which in turn hurt humans. There's a pretty clear link between exposure to it in girls and later breast cancer development. It's a toxin: they know it kills fish and screws up soil. Its carcinogenic properties are no longer speculation, as well.

westofyou
02-08-2010, 04:52 PM
It isn't horribly harmful to mammals in small doses, but it has a good many ecological effects, which in turn hurt humans. There's a pretty clear link between exposure to it in girls and later breast cancer development. It's a toxin: they know it kills fish and screws up soil. Its carcinogenic properties are no longer speculation, as well.

Food chain nightmare, high concentration in raptors.

Scrap Irony
02-08-2010, 05:09 PM
So DDT killed the dinosaurs?

And Toronto's professional basketball team?

Who knew?

durl
02-08-2010, 05:10 PM
It isn't horribly harmful to mammals in small doses, but it has a good many ecological effects, which in turn hurt humans. There's a pretty clear link between exposure to it in girls and later breast cancer development. It's a toxin: they know it kills fish and screws up soil. Its carcinogenic properties are no longer speculation, as well.

I'm curious about the source of the assertion that DDT's carcinogenic properties are confirmed. I've seen a lot of conflicting data but nothing definitive.

marcshoe
02-08-2010, 06:36 PM
James K. Polk. Expanded the U.S. to the Pacific, and i still get him confused with Franklin Pierce.

The Operator
02-08-2010, 06:40 PM
He wasn't born in America, but he was here when he did his best work.

If it weren't for Nikola Tesla, we'd all be buried under a mess of DC transmission lines. AC current made the way we live life today possible.

Edison gets way too much credit in the history books.

westofyou
02-08-2010, 06:42 PM
Edison gets way too much credit in the history books.

And Edison LightHouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edison_Lighthouse)wasn't half as good as Tesla (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_(band))

will5979
02-08-2010, 06:58 PM
And Edison LightHouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edison_Lighthouse)wasn't half as good as Tesla (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_(band))

Tesla rocks man! Now there is an underrated group.

WMR
02-08-2010, 07:18 PM
Definitely agree with Henry Clay.

ochre
02-08-2010, 07:46 PM
Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben
Cornstalk
Little Turtle
Robert M. La Follette, Sr.
Edith Bolling Galt Wilson

Falls City Beer
02-08-2010, 08:39 PM
Anne Hutchinson

TeamSelig
02-08-2010, 09:59 PM
Tila Tequila

RedsManRick
02-08-2010, 11:10 PM
George Washington Carver: Crop rotation basically saved American agriculture.
Henry Ford: See Revolution, Industrial.

Raisor
02-08-2010, 11:18 PM
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Saved the Union. Longstreet gets around Little Round Top they get into the Union rear, destroys the Army of the Potemac, free shot into Washington. England and France recognize the Confederacy CSA wins the war. North America turns into Europe. New war ever 25 years or so.

Or something like that.

KronoRed
02-09-2010, 03:54 AM
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Saved the Union. Longstreet gets around Little Round Top they get into the Union rear, destroys the Army of the Potemac, free shot into Washington. England and France recognize the Confederacy CSA wins the war. North America turns into Europe. New war ever 25 years or so.

Or something like that.

Germany takes over the world.

RFS62
02-09-2010, 08:16 AM
Jim Coombs

919191
02-09-2010, 08:55 AM
Jim Coombs

I think he meant other than him.;)

macro
02-09-2010, 09:43 AM
And Edison LightHouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edison_Lighthouse)wasn't half as good as Tesla (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_%28band%29)

Tesla (the band) gets wrongly lumped in with the hair bands of the 80s.

They took a shot at Edison with their song "Edison's Medicine" back in the early 90s.

savafan
02-09-2010, 10:30 AM
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. Saved the Union. Longstreet gets around Little Round Top they get into the Union rear, destroys the Army of the Potemac, free shot into Washington. England and France recognize the Confederacy CSA wins the war. North America turns into Europe. New war ever 25 years or so.

Or something like that.

Nice to see someone else who agrees with me. :thumbup:

reds1869
02-09-2010, 11:08 AM
Germany takes over the world.

Ah, but without US intervention perhaps the stalemate continues in World War I. So many what ifs to consider.

Ltlabner
02-10-2010, 07:33 AM
Snookie

swaisuc
02-10-2010, 12:50 PM
I'm with the Henry Ford nomination.

Mass produced cars were probably the most important creation in US history and the industry remains huge today. Not to mention the impact he had on factories of other industries with his assembly line improvements.

GAC
02-10-2010, 12:50 PM
Who invented beer? ;)

Chip R
02-10-2010, 12:53 PM
Bob Boone. If not for him, who would RedsZone blame when things go wrong?

Rojo
02-10-2010, 02:13 PM
I'm with the Henry Ford nomination.

Yeah, but he's not underrated. "In the year of our Ford".

westofyou
02-10-2010, 02:22 PM
Yeah, but he's not underrated. "In the year of our Ford".


Agreed.

Ford is as underrated as the Yankees in the 20's, underrated is something akin to Jebidiah Smith to Jim Bridger or Léon Levavasseur to Henry Ford.

jmcclain19
02-10-2010, 06:26 PM
Jonas Salk

Some others I didn't see mentioned
Andrew Carnegie
The Wright Brothers
Alexander Graham Bell
Albert Einstein

Rojo
02-10-2010, 07:30 PM
Jonas Salk

Some others I didn't see mentioned
Andrew Carnegie
The Wright Brothers
Alexander Graham Bell
Albert Einstein

Not to be the thread police, but underrated? Really?

Degenerate39
02-10-2010, 07:34 PM
The Jonas Brothers

Ltlabner
02-10-2010, 09:27 PM
http://doanie.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/snookie-slanket.jpg

Chip R
02-10-2010, 11:30 PM
American Heritage magazine used to do an issue on which Americans were underrated and overrated in several different categories. In the September, 2001 issue, in the category of the Adams political family, they found John & Abagail Adams to be overrated and J.Q. Adams underrated. In the category of admirals, Dewey was found to be overrated and Raymond Spruance underrated. In the category of airplanes, the Wright Bros. Flyer was overrated and the Flyer III underrated. Joe DiMaggio was overrated and Bob Feller underrated ad baseball players. Movie Directors, Kubrick, underrated, Phil Kaufman underrated. For Golden Age TV shows, Arthur Godfrey & Friends was overrated and Ernie Kovacs & Kukla, Fran & Ollie were found to be underrated. Interestingly enough, Sonny Rollins was found to be both over and underrated as far as jazz musicians go. It's a Wonderful Life was found to be an overrated film classic while To Be of Not to Be was found to be underrated. Billy the Kid was an overrated outlaw and John Wesley Hardin underrated. Jack Dempsey was an overrated fighter while Joe Frazier was underrated. The most overrated social-protest movement was the environmentalists and the most underrated were the temperance movement and MADD.

Stephenk29
02-11-2010, 12:41 AM
Germany takes over the world.

Nah, U.S.S.R. had them covered (WWII at least). Germany probably maintains power through WWI though.

I'll add Alexander Hamilton, I guess he might not be underrated if he's on some paper money. Getting the National Bank and central government rolling was kinda huge.

Lyndon Johnson.

BCubb2003
02-11-2010, 03:00 AM
Bob Howsam.

RedsBaron
02-11-2010, 08:11 AM
American Heritage magazine used to do an issue on which Americans were underrated and overrated in several different categories. In the September, 2001 issue, in the category of the Adams political family, they found John & Abagail Adams to be overrated and J.Q. Adams underrated. In the category of admirals, Dewey was found to be overrated and Raymond Spruance underrated. In the category of airplanes, the Wright Bros. Flyer was overrated and the Flyer III underrated. Joe DiMaggio was overrated and Bob Feller underrated ad baseball players. Movie Directors, Kubrick, underrated, Phil Kaufman underrated. For Golden Age TV shows, Arthur Godfrey & Friends was overrated and Ernie Kovacs & Kukla, Fran & Ollie were found to be underrated. Interestingly enough, Sonny Rollins was found to be both over and underrated as far as jazz musicians go. It's a Wonderful Life was found to be an overrated film classic while To Be of Not to Be was found to be underrated. Billy the Kid was an overrated outlaw and John Wesley Hardin underrated. Jack Dempsey was an overrated fighter while Joe Frazier was underrated. The most overrated social-protest movement was the environmentalists and the most underrated were the temperance movement and MADD.
I had thought about trying to find if I still had any of those old issues of American Heritage when this thread began.
I've long thought that John Quincy Adams was underrated, and Raymond Spruance may be the most underrated admiral in American history, having merely commanded U.S. naval forces at Midway, the most important battle in the Pacific in World War II.
Recent popular literature tends to make it appear that Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams were the only two guys who played major league baseball in the 1940s, but at the time Bob Feller and Stan Musial were regarded as their equals. Musial is probably the most underrated baseball player ever.
If we are rating gunfighters, John Wesley Hardin definitely outranks Billy the Kid.

RBA
02-11-2010, 08:46 AM
George Eastman, the inventor of roll film. Which was the basis for the invention of motion picture film.

Hoosier Red
02-11-2010, 10:26 AM
American Heritage magazine used to do an issue on which Americans were underrated and overrated in several different categories. In the September, 2001 issue, in the category of the Adams political family, they found John & Abagail Adams to be overrated and J.Q. Adams underrated. In the category of admirals, Dewey was found to be overrated and Raymond Spruance underrated. In the category of airplanes, the Wright Bros. Flyer was overrated and the Flyer III underrated. Joe DiMaggio was overrated and Bob Feller underrated ad baseball players. Movie Directors, Kubrick, underrated, Phil Kaufman underrated. For Golden Age TV shows, Arthur Godfrey & Friends was overrated and Ernie Kovacs & Kukla, Fran & Ollie were found to be underrated. Interestingly enough, Sonny Rollins was found to be both over and underrated as far as jazz musicians go. It's a Wonderful Life was found to be an overrated film classic while To Be of Not to Be was found to be underrated. Billy the Kid was an overrated outlaw and John Wesley Hardin underrated. Jack Dempsey was an overrated fighter while Joe Frazier was underrated. The most overrated social-protest movement was the environmentalists and the most underrated were the temperance movement and MADD.

It's interesting that the magazine would rate John Adams as overrated all the way back in 2001. I think he's like the inevitable guy who is underrated for so long that people pay attention until he's overrated. He has received his just due since the biography and the HBO series etc al, but I never got the impression that people gave him enough respect before David McCullough.

919191
02-11-2010, 11:14 AM
Seems the Beatles thought Elias Howe was pretty important. If any of you young guys don't get it, ask GAC.

ochre
02-11-2010, 12:33 PM
Musial is probably the most underrated baseball player ever.

I think Jimmie Foxx deserves some consideration there as well.

westofyou
02-11-2010, 01:38 PM
I think Jimmie Foxx deserves some consideration there as well.

Yeah, Foxx has his argument but Musial was way better than even Foxx considering the eras they played in. Stan Musial is perhaps the most underrated superstar, but he still is in the HOF, and that in itself should disqualify him from being underrated.

Underrated baseball players?

Heine Groh comes to mind.

texasdave
02-11-2010, 01:57 PM
How is Dick (Richie) Allen not in the HOF?

RedsBaron
02-11-2010, 02:44 PM
Yeah, Foxx has his argument but Musial was way better than even Foxx considering the eras they played in. Stan Musial is perhaps the most underrated superstar, but he still is in the HOF, and that in itself should disqualify him from being underrated.



The main reason I mentioned Musial is because he was left off the All Century Team in fan voting, and when he was later added to the team there was a mini-controversy because some people thought Roberto Clemente should have been added rather than Musial.

westofyou
02-11-2010, 02:53 PM
How is Dick (Richie) Allen not in the HOF?

Good question to juggle

http://i.cdn.turner.com/sivault/si_online/covers/images/1972/0612_large.jpg

LoganBuck
02-11-2010, 03:44 PM
Good question to juggle

http://i.cdn.turner.com/sivault/si_online/covers/images/1972/0612_large.jpg

Gotta like the caption for the picture. Along with the cigarette hanging from his lip.

westofyou
02-11-2010, 04:50 PM
Gotta like the caption for the picture. Along with the cigarette hanging from his lip.

That smoke broke a long standing taboo in sport journalism, a pretty big hurdle for the times back then.

durl
02-11-2010, 06:34 PM
American Heritage magazine used to do an issue on which Americans were underrated and overrated in several different categories. In the September, 2001 issue, in the category of the Adams political family, they found John & Abagail Adams to be overrated and J.Q. Adams underrated. In the category of admirals, Dewey was found to be overrated and Raymond Spruance underrated. In the category of airplanes, the Wright Bros. Flyer was overrated and the Flyer III underrated. Joe DiMaggio was overrated and Bob Feller underrated ad baseball players. Movie Directors, Kubrick, underrated, Phil Kaufman underrated. For Golden Age TV shows, Arthur Godfrey & Friends was overrated and Ernie Kovacs & Kukla, Fran & Ollie were found to be underrated. Interestingly enough, Sonny Rollins was found to be both over and underrated as far as jazz musicians go. It's a Wonderful Life was found to be an overrated film classic while To Be of Not to Be was found to be underrated. Billy the Kid was an overrated outlaw and John Wesley Hardin underrated. Jack Dempsey was an overrated fighter while Joe Frazier was underrated. The most overrated social-protest movement was the environmentalists and the most underrated were the temperance movement and MADD.

And those issues resulted in more mail than any other. :)

Like most people, I would agree with some choices but others were very questionable. It would all depend on the individual they selected to give their opinion for the particular subject.

cincinnati chili
02-12-2010, 12:20 AM
Have other cities had urban planners as powerful as Robert Moses?

I'm not an expert on the subject, but I doubt it. Daniel Burnham in Chicago was very influential. Obviously, L'Enfant in D.C. But as powerful? I suspect not.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 08:58 PM
Who invented beer? ;)

Augustus Busch came up with "refrigerated cars (trains)" so beer could be transported.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 09:02 PM
I'll add Alexander Hamilton, I guess he might not be underrated if he's on some paper money. Getting the National Bank and central government rolling was kinda huge.



And, willing to die so that Aaron Burr couldn't become President and ruin the country, was the ultimate self-sacrificial act of love for the Country.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 09:03 PM
Like most people, I would agree with some choices but others were very questionable. It would all depend on the individual they selected to give their opinion for the particular subject.

Agree. Nice list, though by GAC.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 09:09 PM
Recent popular literature tends to make it appear that Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams were the only two guys who played major league baseball in the 1940s, but at the time Bob Feller and Stan Musial were regarded as their equals.


Had a couple of baseballs signed by the entire 1954 World Series Cleveland Indians team along with Photographs of all the players and the folder that the photos went into that said "World Series 1954" on it. Sold them a long time ago.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 09:11 PM
Daniel Burnham in Chicago was very influential.

The "Chicago" style is, by far, my favorite. I love incredibly wide streets that have dividers in them with trees in the dividers. That style was borrowed by many city planners around the turn of the 20th Century, give or take 20 years.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 09:13 PM
The main reason I mentioned Musial is because he was left off the All Century Team in fan voting, and when he was later added to the team there was a mini-controversy because some people thought Roberto Clemente should have been added rather than Musial.

I thought it was pretty much a given, that after Ted Williams, Musial was considered the 2nd greatest hitter. But, maybe I have that wrong.

Kingspoint
02-12-2010, 09:21 PM
American Heritage magazine used to do an issue on which Americans were underrated and overrated in several different categories. In the September, 2001 issue, in the category of the Adams political family, they found John & Abagail Adams to be overrated and J.Q. Adams underrated.

I could agree with that because few people, if any at all, know anything about J. Q. Adams. I'm sure if you polled 1000 people with a cross-section of America, not 2% (20 people) could name 3 things that he accomplished. (becoming President isn't one of them, as I mean, specifically accomplished, like what bills did he sign, etc.)

But, when compared to "other Presidents" and other Americans, I firmly believe that John Adams has never gotten the credit he deserves for the forming of the United States. There is no United States without John Adams. That's pretty influential.

Stephenk29
02-13-2010, 03:34 AM
And, willing to die so that Aaron Burr couldn't become President and ruin the country, was the ultimate self-sacrificial act of love for the Country.

Burr was full of conspiracy, but the duel was years after the Presidential run off. So I don't think his death was necessarily crucial in terms of Burr's political power. The duel was four years after Jefferson's election by the House.

Never the less, I think Hamilton's a stud. Bold, arrogant of course, but ridiculuously ahead of his peers in what was needed. Would be interesting to see if he wanted the government to be as big as it is today. "Big" back then was a whole different idea.

Dom Heffner
02-13-2010, 04:25 PM
Limbaugh

He's made it okay for millions of people to become hooked on oxycontin. As Rush said, words and actions mean things, and his story has taught us all that the abuse of prescription drugs can lead you to a life of prosperity, hate, and hearing loss.

George Anderson
02-13-2010, 04:30 PM
He's made it okay for millions of people to become hooked on oxycontin. As Rush said, words and actions mean things, and his story has taught us all that the abuse of prescription drugs can lead you to a life of prosperity, hate, and hearing loss.

LOL

Don't listen him do you?

Dom Heffner
02-13-2010, 04:44 PM
LOL

Don't listen him do you?

I have listened to more Rush Limbaugh than anyone on this board, probably. I was a weekend board operator for WCKY (at least I got paid to listen to it), then the next job in Sarasota was with some retirees who had on WFLA all day long so it was Beck and Limbaugh back to back, all day long, day after day, week after week....

I love broadcasting- I worked in radio for awhile and still could do it without missing a beat. And I must say as a broadcaster- voice, style, inflection- Rush is about as good as they come.

It's too bad he wastes the talent on drivel. It would be easy to dismiss him as "an entetainer," but when you pull crap like he did with Haiti and lives are at stake and he tries to make a political point at their expense- you really get a sense just how off kilter his "mind" is.

LoganBuck
02-13-2010, 05:04 PM
He's made it okay for millions of people to become hooked on oxycontin. As Rush said, words and actions mean things, and his story has taught us all that the abuse of prescription drugs can lead you to a life of prosperity, hate, and hearing loss.

Couldn't resist could you?

:rolleyes:

George Anderson
02-13-2010, 05:15 PM
I have listened to more Rush Limbaugh than anyone on this board, probably. I was a weekend board operator for WCKY (at least I got paid to listen to it), then the next job in Sarasota was with some retirees who had on WFLA all day long so it was Beck and Limbaugh back to back, all day long, day after day, week after week....

I love broadcasting- I worked in radio for awhile and still could do it without missing a beat. And I must say as a broadcaster- voice, style, inflection- Rush is about as good as they come.

It's too bad he wastes the talent on drivel. It would be easy to dismiss him as "an entetainer," but when you pull crap like he did with Haiti and lives are at stake and he tries to make a political point at their expense- you really get a sense just how off kilter his "mind" is.

I have with few exceptions listened to him daily since around 1988. The title of this thread is "Who is one of the most underrated influential people in the history of the U. S." and love him or hate him, you gotta admit El Rushbo is a very influential person in the history of the USA. I am proud to admit that by listening to him all the years I have that without question he has been very influential in the person that I am today and also the success that I have achieved in the business world.

I think unfortunately one of Limbaugh's targets is the national media so thus the national media does everything they can to take everything controversial Rush said and spin it to make it look bad. Haiti is a perfect example of the media spinning something Limbaugh said to make him look bad. In all fairness Limbaugh does take alot of what the national media broadcasts and spins it to make them look bad. It is a war between Limbaugh and the national media and unfortunately they have the upper hand in getting their message out since they have so many more outlets.

I have no desire to turn this thread political because one of the rules of this board is not to discuss politics and as you know one notorious trait of conservatives is to follow the rules. :) Regardless, Limbaugh IMO is very influential whether you like him or not.

Kingspoint
02-13-2010, 05:21 PM
Burr was full of conspiracy, but the duel was years after the Presidential run off. So I don't think his death was necessarily crucial in terms of Burr's political power. The duel was four years after Jefferson's election by the House.

Never the less, I think Hamilton's a stud. Bold, arrogant of course, but ridiculuously ahead of his peers in what was needed. Would be interesting to see if he wanted the government to be as big as it is today. "Big" back then was a whole different idea.

The duel was right before the next election, and Burr had plans of corrupting the Banking in the United States. Hamilton died so that Burr's reputation would be ruined forever, thus ending his political career.

Dom Heffner
02-13-2010, 05:52 PM
Couldn't resist could you?

:rolleyes:

Says the guy who couldn't resist, either, apparently. The rolly eyes did bring a tear to my eye- I almost pulled a Beck, but I held back. I'm going to be okay. :)

Truthfully, if a moral leader of the stature of Rush Limbaugh can take drugs, who says it isn't okay for all the children of the world? My son turns one this month and I'm going to tell him: You can abuse oxycontin given to you by your illegal alien housekeeper to the point of losing your hearing, just like Rushbo. And then you should go on a radio show and criticize and judge everybody else for everything they do, ad nauseum, for the sake of doing the "right thing." As Fred Willard said in Roxanne, "These things work!!!"

George- I would agree Rush is influential, I would disagree he is underrated.

In my opinion, the Haiti thing was not taken out of context- I heard the entire thing, and there is never a context to say what he said. Rush paints himself as a victim, which is sort of laughable for a guy that makes hundreds of millions of dollars and loves himself as much as he does. And for someone who talks about personal responsibility and how "words mean things," he takes zero responsibility for anything he says- case in point, saying the media takes his words out of context.

We probably will respectfully disagree, and that's what is great about the world. One man's junk is another's treasure. But I can agree with you that he is a heck of a broadcaster.:)

Dom Heffner
02-13-2010, 06:14 PM
The duel was right before the next election, and Burr had plans of corrupting the Banking in the United States. Hamilton died so that Burr's reputation would be ruined forever, thus ending his political career.

I've read much about the duel, about Hamilton- never heard this take before. Interesting.

Is it possible you mean Hamilton's death ensured Burr's ruined reputation? Not that Hamilton allowed his life to be taken as apolitical maneuver?

You may be saying this, it just read a little funny to me and now you are making me want to go pick up my Hamilton/Burr book. :)

RedEye
02-14-2010, 12:12 AM
I halfway agree with that: Conservative Republicans almost certainly overrate Reagan. However liberal Democrats also underrate Reagan.
Underrated Americans would probably include a host of inventors and innovators that have been forgotten.
U.S. Grant is still arguably underappreciated as a military strategist.
George P. Shultz ably filled a variety of cabinet positions in several administrations but had little publicity even while in office and has been forgotten.

Okay... obviously the thread doesn't define term--but I find it difficult to call a former president that (at least) half of the voting population still venerates as their last great leader "underrated."

RedEye
02-14-2010, 12:14 AM
Irving Thalberg
Jerry Lewis

Stephenk29
02-14-2010, 02:10 AM
The duel was right before the next election, and Burr had plans of corrupting the Banking in the United States. Hamilton died so that Burr's reputation would be ruined forever, thus ending his political career.

Ah I see.

And I continue on with Dom's question, implying that he intentionally lost the duel?

Sean_CaseyRules
02-14-2010, 04:23 AM
Dave Mustaine.

Shows you that you can go from almost having everything you want to having nothing (Metallica), build yourself back up (Megadeth).

I love reading, hearing about people who rise, fall, and rise again.

cincinnati chili
02-14-2010, 01:28 PM
Dave Mustaine.

Shows you that you can go from almost having everything you want to having nothing (Metallica), build yourself back up (Megadeth).

I love reading, hearing about people who rise, fall, and rise again.

Didn't Mustaine get kicked out of Metallica for doing TOO MANY DRUGS? Maybe that wasn't the reason, but if so, that's quite an accomplishment.

MWM
02-14-2010, 05:59 PM
Nothing but dudes being mentioned. Surely there were some ladies who have been very influential in our history.

Rojo
02-14-2010, 07:16 PM
Nothing but dudes being mentioned. Surely there were some ladies who have been very influential in our history.

I've got one -- Ayn Rand.

Her novels are hack works lifted from other authors and her philosophical stuff is shallow.

But Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead still mold a lot of young people just as they gain a political conscientiousness (and when they're young enough to think they can take the world by the tail).

So she's overrated due to the zealousness of her acolytes but underrated by the rest of us who dismiss her casually and overlook her influence.

Kingspoint
02-14-2010, 08:12 PM
I've read much about the duel, about Hamilton- never heard this take before. Interesting.

Is it possible you mean Hamilton's death ensured Burr's ruined reputation? Not that Hamilton allowed his life to be taken as apolitical maneuver?

You may be saying this, it just read a little funny to me and now you are making me want to go pick up my Hamilton/Burr book. :)

Yes. I'm saying that Hamilton willingly let Burr kill him knowing that it would ruin Burr's future political career and undo any intentions that Burr had regarding getting hold of the US Banking system.

While Hamilton, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were all on opposite ends of the political spectrum for most of their lives, none of them were bad men. Burr was a bad man. The US needed the "differences" of all three men, but didn't need any of the likes of Aaron Burr. Unfortunately, I think the majority of politicians and corporate executives fall under the Burr mode today.

Kingspoint
02-14-2010, 08:18 PM
Ah I see.

And I continue on with Dom's question, implying that he intentionally lost the duel?

Yes. He did intentionally lose the duel. He was too great a man to kill (considering it was he who was trying to ruin Burr politically) in cold blood. Hamilton was also a better shot.

Kingspoint
02-14-2010, 08:21 PM
Nothing but dudes being mentioned. Surely there were some ladies who have been very influential in our history.

Certainly men took credit for what women have accomplished throughout U. S. History, but the greatest ruler in European History was Sweden's Queen Christina. She was half a millenium before her time.

Men have never liked women in power. You need look no further than the witch hunt of Marge Schott. She was no more prejudiced/racist than any of the other owners, yet she was the only one investigated and railroaded out of town.

Kingspoint
02-14-2010, 08:24 PM
Also, for what it's worth, the Paul Giamatti portrayal of John Adams and the Helen Hunt portrayal of Abigail Adams couldn't have been further from the truth. The series, though, was excellent. Just don't ever believe that John Adams and Abigail Adams were anything like that.

I've found David McCullough to be extremely unreliable. He does a poor job of checking his sources. Found way too many mistakes in his works where he proposes fiction to be fact, whether regarding Lincoln or Adams or the Civil War.

George Anderson
02-14-2010, 11:02 PM
Also, for what it's worth, the Paul Giamatti portrayal of John Adams and the Helen Hunt portrayal of Abigail Adams couldn't have been further from the truth. The series, though, was excellent. Just don't ever believe that John Adams and Abigail Adams were anything like that.

.

How so??

I really liked the entire series.

George Foster
02-15-2010, 12:32 AM
A.B. "Happy" Chandler. He approved the big decision. He was not approved by the owners for a second term as commish, because of it.

Kingspoint
02-15-2010, 01:26 AM
How so??

I really liked the entire series.

I, too, liked the entire series. Their attention to detail was really good. But, they totally missed on the personalities of John and Abigail Adams. Both were children of Protestant/Puritan Ministers, and they took their religion and the values of 1750 Protestant religion very seriously. There's was closer to the 1720-1730 variety that their father's teachings instilled in them. Both had been in the area (Massachusetts) for at least 4 generations (even sharing a great-great-grandmother) where raising one's voice because of "temper" in the home was strictly forbidden and disrespectful. John and Abigail were extremely "respectful" of one another and neither would have had a discourse with each other where shouting was more acceptable to an intelligent, respectful exchange of ideas. It's hard for anyone here in these times to imagine people going through life without shouting at each other, but it was pretty commonplace back then. The reason it was more commonplace was because of the pride and respectfulness one has for another human being when the most important thing in your life is to live according to God's word, especially with the surrounding community one had back in the early 1700's to remind each other of the behaviors that went along with it. As a faithful Protestant, neither of them would have behaved in the manner shown on the screen from this series. That comes from a perspective of David McCullough, Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, none of whom have the understanding of what it means to be living in a devout Protestant home of children of Ministers from the 1720's. Abigail and John Adams were very "patient" with their voices and would have always maintained a pleasant "tone" with each other. McCullough, Hanks and Spielberg either intentionally, or ignorantly (which is my belief), left out the religious "characteristics" of their personalities, which is what the core of their personality and everything they did and thought derived from. But, I wouldn't expect anything less from Hollywood.

John and Abigail, even in their early years (their 30's and 40's) spoke to each other of how irreverent the community had become. What it "had become" would have made any community today look like Sodom and Gomorrah. So, it's almost impossible for any of us, including myself, to understand exactly how religious behavior was ingrained into the lives of John and Abigail. It was simply, everything to them. They gave up their lives so that they could "do the right thing" for the greater good of generations of people down the road. They had great Faith.

When giving discourse in a public debate, John Adams would have been different, but that's a different scenario altogether.

There are also people today who also go throughout life without having to shout at each other when discussing differences. But, it doesn't make for dramatic scenes on the screen.

Sean_CaseyRules
02-15-2010, 02:13 AM
Didn't Mustaine get kicked out of Metallica for doing TOO MANY DRUGS? Maybe that wasn't the reason, but if so, that's quite an accomplishment.

He got kicked out for being a drunk a**hole, and yeah he did every drug under the sun, and claims to be clean for a very long time now.

RBA
02-15-2010, 11:30 AM
Mr Kool-Aid?

http://newt.org/Portals/0/UltraPhotoGallery/706/KoolAid.jpg

He influenced many to hyphenate their names.

ie: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Olivia Newton-John, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov

savafan
02-15-2010, 11:45 AM
Vint Cerf

Yachtzee
02-15-2010, 12:46 PM
Men have never liked women in power. You need look no further than the witch hunt of Marge Schott. She was no more prejudiced/racist than any of the other owners, yet she was the only one investigated and railroaded out of town.

Marge Schott's problems were largely self-inflicted. I don't know where you got the notion that all other owners shared her views, but I hardly find her to have been subject of a "witch hunt."

BCubb2003
02-15-2010, 01:41 PM
Candy Cummings

Roy Tucker
02-15-2010, 01:52 PM
Winfield Scott for his role in the US-Mexican War.

Napoleon Bonaparte for the Lousiana Purchase.

RedsBaron
02-15-2010, 01:56 PM
Underrrated influential people would have to include a lot of people I've rarely heard of, and people who worked behind the scenes or laid the groundwork for changes to follow. Here are three examples:
Charles Hamilton Houston (1895-1950) is someone I had never read much about until recently. He was dean of Howard University, Director of Litigation for the NAACP, and the mentor of Thurgood Marshall. He laid much of the legal groundwork for the demise of "Jim Crow" and the Brown v. Board of Education decision, although he died before that case was decided. Marshall is remembered as the first black justice on the U.S. Supreme Court, but Houston blazed the trail.
Andrew Higgins (1886-1952) created the Higgins Boat which made landings on beaches possible in WWII. Dwight Eisenhower later called him "the man who won the war for us."
William A. Steiger (1938-1978) was one of the early leaders of what became to be called "supply side economics" and managed to get his bill, reducing taxes, enacted in 1978 even though his party was in the minority in Congress. He died of a heart attack later that year and never witnessed the electoral victories to come for "his side."

RedsBaron
02-15-2010, 01:59 PM
Winfield Scott for his role in the US-Mexican War.



Although in his mid 70s when the Civil War started, Scott also devised the "Anaconda Plan" which arguably was finally used by the Union to defeat the Confederacy.

UKFlounder
02-15-2010, 02:27 PM
William H. Seward, for his purchase of Alaska, aka "Seward's Folly" at the time. It might be underappreciated.



Winfield Scott for his role in the US-Mexican War.

Napoleon Bonaparte for the Lousiana Purchase.

ochre
02-15-2010, 04:57 PM
Napoleon Bonaparte for the Lousiana Purchase.
I'll give credit to Toussaint L'Ouverture and Jean-Jacques Dessalines for the Louisiana purchase... :)

ochre
02-15-2010, 05:03 PM
Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben
Cornstalk
Little Turtle
Robert M. La Follette, Sr.
Edith Bolling Galt Wilson


Nothing but dudes being mentioned. Surely there were some ladies who have been very influential in our history.
First woman president (acting) of the US.

vaticanplum
02-22-2010, 08:31 PM
Buckminster Fuller.

Louisa May Alcott's father. I can't even remember his name, that's how underrated he is.

Catholic nuns. They were really some of the first great social workers and civil rights leaders, and always in the shadow of the male heirarchy of the church. They went into disaster zones in the US, saved orphans, fought for equal rights, pioneered education. They are seriously unheralded.

Also, minor detail, but Helen Hunt didn't play Abigail Adams, Laura linney did. I still haven't seen this miniseries though.

Tom Servo
02-22-2010, 08:33 PM
For my money, Rod Serling.

marcshoe
02-22-2010, 08:35 PM
Louisa May Alcott's father was named Arroyo, iirc.

vaticanplum
02-22-2010, 08:45 PM
Louisa May Alcott's father was named Arroyo, iirc.

That's it!!! ;)

Bronson Alcott. I wonder if Arroyo is named for him. I'm guessing perhaps not.

marcshoe
02-22-2010, 09:00 PM
Arroyo was named for the old motorcycle series "Then Came Bronson", unless I just imagined it. Which is possible.

Redsfan320
02-22-2010, 11:02 PM
Arroyo was named for actor Charles Bronson.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bronson

"Legacy in Pop Cultue"... "Major League Baseball pitcher Bronson Arroyo (born 1977) is named after him."

320

Kingspoint
02-22-2010, 11:42 PM
Also, minor detail, but Helen Hunt didn't play Abigail Adams, Laura linney did. I still haven't seen this miniseries though.

They don't let you edit after 60 minutes here, so I was unable to change it when I realized I'd posted the wrong name. Laura Linney played that role the same way she plays every role....yelling at everybody she speaks to.

Kingspoint
02-22-2010, 11:43 PM
Catholic nuns. They were really some of the first great social workers and civil rights leaders, and always in the shadow of the male heirarchy of the church. They went into disaster zones in the US, saved orphans, fought for equal rights, pioneered education. They are seriously unheralded.



Nice point about the nuns.

BCubb2003
02-22-2010, 11:54 PM
Hedy Lamarr.

Chip R
02-23-2010, 01:18 AM
Hedy Lamarr.

That's Hedley.

http://bignewsreport.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/hedley-lamarr.jpg

Yachtzee
02-23-2010, 02:34 AM
Arroyo was named for actor Charles Bronson.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bronson

"Legacy in Pop Cultue"... "Major League Baseball pitcher Bronson Arroyo (born 1977) is named after him."

320

At least he wasn't named after Bronson Pinchot.

Random Person: Bronson? That's an interesting name. Are you named after Charles Bronson?
Arroyo: No. Bronson Pinchot. My parents really loved Cousin Balki.

Kingspoint
02-23-2010, 05:38 AM
Hedy Lamarr.

I read her autobiography 29 years ago. Very interesting.

From Wikipedia:

On 10 August 1933 she married Friedrich Mandl, a Vienna-based arms manufacturer 13 years her senior. In her autobiography "Ecstasy and Me", Lamarr described Mandl as an extremely controlling man who sometimes tried to keep her shut up in their mansion. The Austrian bought up as many copies of the film as he could possibly find, as he objected to her and "the expression on her face". (Lamarr later claimed the looks of passion were the result of the director poking her in the bottom with a safety pin.)

Mandl prevented her from pursuing her acting career, and instead took her to meetings with technicians and business partners. In these meetings, the mathematically-talented Lamarr learned about military technology. Otherwise she had to stay at Castle Schwarzenau. She later related that, even though Mandl was part-Jewish, he was consorting with Nazi industrialists, which infuriated her. In the book "Ecstasy and Me", Lamarr wrote that dictators Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler both attended Mandl's grand parties. She related that in 1937 she disguised herself as one of her maids and fled to Paris, where she obtained a divorce, and then moved on to London. According to another version of the episode, she persuaded Mandl to allow her to attend a party wearing all her expensive jewelry, later drugged him with the help of her maid, and made her escape out of the country with the jewelry.

What they don't mention here is that in the book, she claims that when she made her escape, she was being chased by people of her husband and she ducked into a building, then opened a door and went into a room, but the lights were out in the room. All of a sudden the lights turned on and she found herself alone in a round room with glass windows all around. Suddenly a door opened and a man walked into the room. He was naked. She went with the flow and made love to him in the middle of the room. It was a peep-show. Anyway, that's what she claims, but then it's a "Hollywood" autobiography, so who knows? She was Jewish, so the fears were real.

kpresidente
02-24-2010, 04:45 PM
I've got one -- Ayn Rand.

Her novels are hack works lifted from other authors and her philosophical stuff is shallow.

But Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead still mold a lot of young people just as they gain a political conscientiousness (and when they're young enough to think they can take the world by the tail).

So she's overrated due to the zealousness of her acolytes but underrated by the rest of us who dismiss her casually and overlook her influence.

None of that matters. Rand said what everybody really believes but is afraid to say because of the backlash by petty, self-righteous hypocrites and bleeding hearts. That's why she's influential to young people.

Rojo
02-24-2010, 06:09 PM
None of that matters. Rand said what everybody really believes but is afraid to say because of the backlash by petty, self-righteous hypocrites and bleeding hearts. That's why she's influential to young people.

Not everyone believes it.

marcshoe
02-24-2010, 06:58 PM
Arroyo was named for actor Charles Bronson.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Bronson

"Legacy in Pop Cultue"... "Major League Baseball pitcher Bronson Arroyo (born 1977) is named after him."

320
Now that you say that, I remember it. I just made the "then came..." connection in my mind.

savafan
02-25-2010, 11:43 AM
Would it be silly to say Gene Roddenberry? Just thinking about all of the technology that we have today thanks to Star Trek.

westofyou
02-25-2010, 11:50 AM
Would it be silly to say Gene Roddenberry? Just thinking about all of the technology that we have today thanks to Star Trek.

Such as?

BCubb2003
02-25-2010, 11:53 AM
I read her autobiography 29 years ago. Very interesting.



She also invented frequency hopping that became a key part of radio and wireless communications.

savafan
02-25-2010, 11:54 AM
Such as?

Automatic sliding doors, cell phones, universal translators, and now, The IPad

redsmetz
02-25-2010, 12:00 PM
Automatic sliding doors, cell phones, universal translators, and now, The IPad

Sliding doors were invented in 1960 and I would suggest that Chester Gould (creator of Dick Tracy) was a bit ahead of Roddenberry on cellular phones.

savafan
02-25-2010, 12:10 PM
Sliding doors were invented in 1960 and I would suggest that Chester Gould (creator of Dick Tracy) was a bit ahead of Roddenberry on cellular phones.

Well...I guess I was always told wrong. Thanks. :)

RedsBaron
02-25-2010, 12:17 PM
Automatic sliding doors, cell phones, universal translators, and now, The IPad

You left out transporters and warp drive. I do't know how we ever did without those. ;)

westofyou
02-25-2010, 02:16 PM
“Originality is the art of concealing your sources”

from wiki:

The universal translator is a device common to many science fiction works, especially on television. First described in Murray Leinster's 1945 novella "First Contact,"[1] the translator's purpose is to offer an instant translation of any language. Like hyperdrive, a universal translator depicted in these works is a somewhat improbable technology[2] that is an accepted convention in science fiction stories and serves as a useful plot device. Even so, technology companies are striving to develop a practical "universal" translator for common use.



http://lonewolflibrarian.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/dicktracy.jpg