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nate
02-18-2010, 10:31 AM
Here's (http://www.beyondtheboxscore.com/2010/2/17/1315225/2010/2/17/1315225/players-that-cost-their-teams-the) an interesting article (well, more of a table) about players who cost their team the most due to injury from 2002-2009.

You may see a familiar name or two there.

redsmetz
02-18-2010, 10:51 AM
I'm not sure there's a way to know, but I wonder how much, if any, insurance covered the lost portion of Griffey's time off. We basically lost two years of Griffey's time and there's no question some of the time he was back, he wasn't the player who had come over. When you look at his first year production in Cincinnati (40 HR's), folks forget we got the player we wanted. One comment put Griffey under the category of "overpaid," but I still think we got a good deal that was deeply marred by the injuries which cost Griffey so much.

klw
02-18-2010, 11:34 AM
The list is missing Albert Belle who should be around number 8 having cost the Orioles 25.368 million in '02,'03.
http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/b/belleal01.shtml

westofyou
02-18-2010, 11:41 AM
On that note here's a free Injury DB on this site
http://blog.rotobase.com/2010/02/free-player-injury-database/


When I started working on Rotobase I knew I wanted to generate notes like the following:

Negatives:
Injured wrist last season. 12% chance of re-injury. Players saw power drop by 17% in the year following this injury.

However all the databases out there are either proprietary, or donít allow for easy access to the underlying data for analysis. So, I started developing my own database, starting with 2009. It was a bear. Scouring the news sites and local papers for injury info is not fun. It makes me respect completely the work Corey Dawkins put in to generate his tool, but it also makes me upset knowing that the work had been done, but that it wasnít available for other folks to analyze.

So 2 months ago I asked some gentlemen in India to help me. Last week they blew me away, and delivered a pretty good data set of all players back to 2002. The database uses the data model developed by Tom Tango, where each injury is broken out by body part injured, side and description. This allows for a pretty granular analysis.

The work was hard, but Iím pleased to report my portion of it is finished (for now). Iím making the CSV file and the SQL dump available for download here. Iím hoping the community will find it useful enough to help me keep it updated.

All players are referenced using retroIDs.

There are only two restrictions on using the data, and folks can use it for commercial purposes if they choose.

1. You must post a link back to Rotobase.
2. You must make any additions to the database public in CSV or SQL dump form for others to use and enjoy.

I look forward to seeing what the saber community does with the info. For my part, Iíll be posting my analysis of some of the data in the next few days.

Enjoy!

nate
02-18-2010, 11:51 AM
I'm not sure there's a way to know, but I wonder how much, if any, insurance covered the lost portion of Griffey's time off. We basically lost two years of Griffey's time and there's no question some of the time he was back, he wasn't the player who had come over. When you look at his first year production in Cincinnati (40 HR's), folks forget we got the player we wanted. One comment put Griffey under the category of "overpaid," but I still think we got a good deal that was deeply marred by the injuries which cost Griffey so much.

I wonder that as well.

MikeS21
02-18-2010, 01:31 PM
I'm not sure there is any way to figure the total amount of money lost by Griffey's injuries. When you add up insurance costs, medical costs, rehab costs, Griffey's salary when not playing, cost of replacement players, the number begins to creep up. Add to that the intangible costs, such as fans who stayed away from the ballpark because Junior was on the DL, PR losses from Junior's "non-appearances" in All-Star games and the like, and lost development time for replacement players, it is devastating to a small market team who was fearful to step foot in the FA market to begin with.

Chip R
02-18-2010, 01:39 PM
I'm not sure there is any way to figure the total amount of money lost by Griffey's injuries. When you add up insurance costs, medical costs, rehab costs, Griffey's salary when not playing, cost of replacement players, the number begins to creep up. Add to that the intangible costs, such as fans who stayed away from the ballpark because Junior was on the DL, PR losses from Junior's "non-appearances" in All-Star games and the like, and lost development time for replacement players, it is devastating to a small market team who was fearful to step foot in the FA market to begin with.


That's a good point about lost attendance. I'll take it a step further. Let's say Jr. had seasons close to what he did in 2000. That more than likely would have made the team better and there would not only be fans coming out to watch him play but others would come out to watch a contending/winning team. If the Reds happened to make the playoffs and/or advance in the playoffs all the way to the World Series and/or if they actually won another World Series, there's an automatic bump in attendance the following season. Pity it didn't work out the way we hoped it would.

nate
02-19-2010, 06:17 PM
An interesting related article here (http://www.beyondtheboxscore.com/2010/2/19/1318203/2010/2/19/1318203/percentage-of-team-payroll-lost-to).

MikeS21
02-19-2010, 10:20 PM
That's a good point about lost attendance. I'll take it a step further. Let's say Jr. had seasons close to what he did in 2000. That more than likely would have made the team better and there would not only be fans coming out to watch him play but others would come out to watch a contending/winning team. If the Reds happened to make the playoffs and/or advance in the playoffs all the way to the World Series and/or if they actually won another World Series, there's an automatic bump in attendance the following season. Pity it didn't work out the way we hoped it would.
And, that was really the plan. After the near miss in 1999, the Reds added Junior to get them over the hump, so more talent could be added, along with youngsters like Kearns and Dunn. It just didn't happen.

Ron Madden
02-20-2010, 03:03 AM
And, that was really the plan. After the near miss in 1999, the Reds added Junior to get them over the hump, so more talent could be added, along with youngsters like Kearns and Dunn. It just didn't happen.

The missing ingredient was pitching.

The Reds scored a lot of runs in the last decade, problem was a horrible starting pitching rotation and worn out relievers.

nate
02-21-2010, 02:57 PM
And another (http://www.beyondtheboxscore.com/2010/2/21/1319936/how-many-wins-did-teams-lose-to) follow up regarding how injury affected win/loss record.