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View Full Version : Hey people, the plural of RBI is RBIs - STOP THE PRETENTIOUSNESS



cincinnati chili
02-20-2010, 12:23 AM
It's getting trendy to say "RBI" to represent the plural of "RBI" (e.g. "Hack Wilson had 190 RBI in his best year."). I'm not sure when it started. The first guy I can remember doing it was Keith Olbermann back in his SportsCenter days. Whoever started this needs to be spanked. The plural of RBI is RBIs.

In the English language, absent bizarre exceptions, we use the letter s to represent the plural. Bizarre exceptions include word reindeer, even though it always makes me smile when little kids say "reindeers." This convention extends to acronyms.

To refer to multiple attorneys general in the acronym form one says "AGs". ("The AGs of the Northeastern states will have a conference call to discuss interstate liquor sales"). To refer to multiple prisoners of war or weapons of mass destruction, one says "POWs" or "WMDs."

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200409/wallraff

We are a smart-minded messages board based in a non-pretentious midwestern town. We have the sense to know that RBI are not reindeer. So I urge you to resist this annoying trend to use "RBI" to represent the plural form.

11larkin11
02-20-2010, 12:31 AM
If we're going to be technical, shouldn't it be RsBI?

Bill
02-20-2010, 12:34 AM
Doesn't RBI stand for runs batted in which is plural. I see no need for an s though I do see an s added to mpg when it refers miles per gallon but never an s when it is minutes per game.

Blitz Dorsey
02-20-2010, 01:25 AM
Doesn't RBI stand for runs batted in which is plural. I see no need for an s though I do see an s added to mpg when it refers miles per gallon but never an s when it is minutes per game.

Yes, but like he pointed out, Weapons of Mass Destruction are referred to as WMDs (not WMD) when people are speaking in the plural form (even though the first word is "weapons" plural). Once something becomes an acronym, you need to put an "s" on the end of it to make it plural. If you were spelling it out, it would be different.

Of course it's "Runs" batted in (plural). But once you make it into the acronym "RBI" you have to put an "s" on the end of it to make it plural.

If this doesn't make sense to you, you simply didn't score high enough on your ACT or SAT back in the day. ;-)

919191
02-20-2010, 01:57 AM
Heck, I still slip sometimes and say I'm going to Krogers.:)

Dom Heffner
02-20-2010, 02:12 AM
91- you are correct.

Didn't think so at first but everything I'm reading supports what you are saying.

ochre
02-20-2010, 02:53 AM
I'm careful to pronounce the apostrophe clearly, so people know I'm using the possessive, except for when it's not. Kroger's grocery store.

Ron Madden
02-20-2010, 03:38 AM
Who care's

;)

GAC
02-20-2010, 04:16 AM
Heck, I still slip sometimes and say I'm going to Krogers.:)


I still go to Walmarts. ;)

RBI, RBIs? Is it really that much of a big deal? The message still gets across OK doesn't it?

I pronouce Ohio as Ohia, and worsh my clothes.

So I'm a hilligan. :dunno:

Tom Servo
02-20-2010, 04:39 AM
Another confusing one is people tend to use 'DFA'ed' in refernce to some designated for assingment, which apparently would mean they were designat for assignmented. I usually just say something like 'A's DFA Willy Taveras'.

Bill
02-20-2010, 05:01 AM
Right, acronyms. Somehow I missed that sentence/explanation from the original post.

I hate acronyms. RBI is good of course, a classic, but everything is an acronym anymore as if we no longer have time to use words. Texting is not helping either.

Razor Shines
02-20-2010, 05:07 AM
Another confusing one is people tend to use 'DFA'ed' in refernce to some designated for assingment, which apparently would mean they were designat for assignmented. I usually just say something like 'A's DFA Willy Taveras'.

Yeah, that's a good one. I think it would fall under the same catagory though.

BTW, I love The Life and Times of Tim. I've got last night's on the DVR, but haven't watched it yet.

kpresidente
02-20-2010, 05:29 AM
We have the sense to know that RBI are not reindeer.

Don't you mean, "we have the sense to know RBIs are not raindeer."

RichRed
02-20-2010, 05:44 AM
Yeah, that's a good one. I think it would fall under the same catagory though.

BTW, I love The Life and Times of Tim. I've got last night's on the DVR, but haven't watched it yet.

You mean you DVR'd it? (That's one I've been known to use.)

oneupper
02-20-2010, 06:39 AM
Thanks Chili. I was used to using RBIs since I'm not that young, and that's what we called them back then. Then I see everyone using RBI without the "s' and I figured I was an idiot all these years.
I'm still an idiot, but at least this isn't the reason!

Razor Shines
02-20-2010, 07:08 AM
You mean you DVR'd it? (That's one I've been known to use.)

Nice, I use that one too.

nate
02-20-2010, 07:44 AM
The best thing would be to simply stop talking about RBI(s).

:cool:'s

reds1869
02-20-2010, 07:45 AM
The best thing would be to simply stop talking about RBI(s).

:cool:'s

Well played.

max venable
02-20-2010, 09:34 AM
I'm with Chili on this one.

If we go with the "trendy," so-called correct RBI rather than RBIs, then what happens to the term Ribbies? As in, "he has 100 ribbies so far this year." Do we now say, "He has 100 ribbie so far this year."?

It just doesn't work.

RBI stands for Run Batted In. If there's more than one, it's RBIs. Period. :D

Joseph
02-20-2010, 09:50 AM
AGs would be correct. A group of Attorney Generals.

WMDs and POWs would be inaccurate though. Just because everyone else does it doesn't mean I should do it, right mom?

Joey Votto has had 84 RBI each of the last two seasons, not 84 RBIs.

Though deep down, I don't care enough either way to chastise anyone for being wrong. I'm used to people around me being wrong.

I'm more annoyed with the Krogers thing. :)

Marc D
02-20-2010, 10:23 AM
Its not as bad as when people say a player knows how to "score" the basketball.

That one drives me nuts.

Unassisted
02-20-2010, 10:29 AM
After we fix this can we "fix" Al Michaels' pretentious contribution to the baseball announcer's lexicon? I'd like to go an entire year without hearing a reference to the "regular year."

Bob Borkowski
02-20-2010, 10:30 AM
I'm careful to pronounce the apostrophe clearly, so people know I'm using the possessive, except for when it's not. Kroger's grocery store.

Same here. Barney Kroger opened the first Kroger store so that makes the possessive perfectly fine. The chain of stores resulting from the original store calls for 'apostrophe s'.

Doing the same with Wal-Mart or Target or Burger King...ah, I don't think so.

Blimpie
02-20-2010, 10:36 AM
I could be alone on this one, but I kinda have a problem with the redundancies found within:

PIN #
SSN #

Roy Tucker
02-20-2010, 10:59 AM
I guess I sometimes use RBI and sometimes use RBIs depending on the context. And I've done that ever since I can remember.

Like "did he he get an RBI on that?", "Votto had 84 RBIs last year", blah blah.

This style guide says that if the acronym is sometimes used as a singular, the put the "s" on the end of it to eliminate confusion when meaning plural.

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/plurals.htm



Some abbreviations have embedded plural forms, and there are often inconsistencies in creating the plurals of these words. The speed of an internal combustion engine is measured in "revolutions per minute" or rpm (lower case) and the efficiency of an automobile is reported in "miles per gallon" or mpg (no "-s" endings). On the other hand, baseball players love to accumulate "runs batted in," a statistic that is usually reported as RBIs (although it would not be terribly unusual to hear that someone got 100 RBI last year and some baseball commentators will talk about "ribbies," too). Also, the U.S. military provides "meals ready to eat" and those rations are usually described as MREs (not MRE). When an abbreviation can be used to refer to a singular thing a run batted in, a meal ready-to-eat, a prisoner of war it's surely a good idea to form the plural by adding "s" to the abbreviation: RBIs, MREs, POWs. (Notice that no apostrophe is involved in the formation of these plurals. Whether abbreviations like these are formed with upper- or lower-case letters is a matter of great mystery; only your dictionary editor knows for sure.)

Notice, furthermore, that we do not use an apostrophe to create plurals in the following:

The 1890s in Europe are widely regarded as years of social decadence.
I have prepared 1099s for the entire staff.
Rosa and her brother have identical IQs, and they both have PhDs from Harvard.
She has over 400 URLs* in her bookmark file.



Authority for this last paragraph: Keys for Writers: A Brief Handbook by Ann Raimes. Houghton Mifflin: New York. 1996.

Big Klu
02-20-2010, 11:02 AM
AGs would be correct. A group of Attorney Generals.

WMDs and POWs would be inaccurate though. Just because everyone else does it doesn't mean I should do it, right mom?

Joey Votto has had 84 RBI each of the last two seasons, not 84 RBIs.

Though deep down, I don't care enough either way to chastise anyone for being wrong. I'm used to people around me being wrong.

I'm more annoyed with the Krogers thing. :)

Is it "Attorney Generals", or "Attorneys General"? :cool:

traderumor
02-20-2010, 11:14 AM
I have prepared 1099s for the entire staff. And I disagree with this. It should read "I have prepared Forms 1099 for the entire staff." ;)

Razor Shines
02-20-2010, 11:38 AM
I could be alone on this one, but I kinda have a problem with the redundancies found within:

PIN #
SSN #

Yeah, I'm with you on that one. Also, I'm contracted by Government agencies and we have Common Access Cards or CACs. Most people refer to them as CAC cards, I've corrected anyone when they make this error because it's so prevalent, but in my mind I'm calling them horrible names. :p:

marcshoe
02-20-2010, 11:40 AM
Wasn't the RsBI thing a pet cause of Tony Kubek back in the seventies, around the same time he was telling everyone they were pronouncing Tony Perez's last name wrong?

Man, I'm old.

mth123
02-20-2010, 11:42 AM
I LOLed when I read this thread.

I ain't never seen such a fuss over usin' English in a proper manner.

Reds/Flyers Fan
02-20-2010, 11:44 AM
I still go to Walmarts. ;)

RBI, RBIs? Is it really that much of a big deal? The message still gets across OK doesn't it?

I pronouce Ohio as Ohia, and worsh my clothes.

So I'm a hilligan. :dunno:

As long as you don't say "Cincinnattuh." That makes me cringe every time
I have absolutely no idea where that came from or how anyone could possibly see an "i" and want to say "uh." Digger Phelps said it on ESPN the other day and I had to change the channel. Couldn't listen to him anymore after that.

mth123
02-20-2010, 11:45 AM
Wasn't the RsBI thing a pet cause of Tony Kubek back in the seventies, around the same time he was telling everyone they were pronouncing Tony Perez's last name wrong?

Man, I'm old.

The Perez thing makes me laugh, because when the try the "Spanish" pronunciation its still wrong. It still wouldn't be Tony Pairis.

Bob Borkowski
02-20-2010, 11:55 AM
As long as you don't say "Cincinnattuh." That makes me cringe every time
I have absolutely no idea where that came from or how anyone could possibly see an "i" and want to say "uh." Digger Phelps said it on ESPN the other day and I had to change the channel. Couldn't listen to him anymore after that.

But Sparky always said it! :cool:

Raisor
02-20-2010, 11:56 AM
Are we sure it's not Runs Battedes Ins?

JaxRed
02-20-2010, 12:18 PM
Mark me down for RBI's

Yachtzee
02-20-2010, 12:21 PM
As long as you don't say "Cincinnattuh." That makes me cringe every time
I have absolutely no idea where that came from or how anyone could possibly see an "i" and want to say "uh." Digger Phelps said it on ESPN the other day and I had to change the channel. Couldn't listen to him anymore after that.

I always thought that was a Kentucky thing, as my grandfather always says "Cincinnattuh" and is originally from Kentucky.

Joseph
02-20-2010, 12:24 PM
I'll preface this by saying I'm a Kentucky boy myself. I also do not say Cincinnatuh, however I do find it somewhat charming. Most likely because I have an uncle who says it that way and between he and my father they are what got me into Reds baseball.

Brutus
02-20-2010, 01:03 PM
Was a thread really necessary on this? Correct as though it may be, who cares if people want to say RBI or RBI(s). I'm as OCD about certain grammatical nuances as the next guy, but it's a message board and I don't think it matters if people choose to use the singular or plural form of an acronym.

I know it's the offseason, but have we sunk this low?

OMG(s)

RichRed
02-20-2010, 01:04 PM
I still go to Walmarts. ;)

RBI, RBIs? Is it really that much of a big deal? The message still gets across OK doesn't it?

I pronouce Ohio as Ohia, and worsh my clothes.

So I'm a hilligan. :dunno:

...And stay out of the Woolsworth!

http://www.morninpaper.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/obrother_02.jpg

Raisor
02-20-2010, 01:12 PM
Was a thread really necessary on this?

You thought it was important enough to a)look at it, and b) comment on it, right?

RichRed
02-20-2010, 01:17 PM
Its not as bad as when people say a player knows how to "score" the basketball.

That one drives me nuts.

Ugh, same here. That's along the same lines for me as "grow our business."

Another vote for RBIs here, if we're keeping score.

Brutus
02-20-2010, 01:41 PM
You thought it was important enough to a)look at it, and b) comment on it, right?

nm

Roy Tucker
02-20-2010, 01:46 PM
Hey, its a message board, not curing cancer or world peace. No topic is beneath us.

Silly and irrelevant, thy name is RedsZone. :)

kaldaniels
02-20-2010, 01:52 PM
Am I wrong for seeing the irony in the fact that this thread says "stop the pretentiousness". Isn't the spirit of this thread pretentios in nature?

11larkin11
02-20-2010, 02:40 PM
Ugh, same here. That's along the same lines for me as "grow our business."

Another vote for RBIs here, if we're keeping score.

You see that baseball game the other day? Yeah, the Reds scored a point in the 9th to win.

Gah. Annoys the crap out of me.

RedEye
02-20-2010, 03:01 PM
I understand the annoyance... but why the accusation of "pretentiousness"?

Yachtzee
02-20-2010, 04:02 PM
STOP THE INSANITY!

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/__IFbq2E4ELE/St3AlandctI/AAAAAAAAAtQ/A9MM_c6WkXw/s400/susan-powter_l.jpg

;)

TheNext44
02-20-2010, 04:11 PM
Here is some more solid grammatical advice:

Avoid abbrev's.

Remember to never split an infinitive.

Never generalize.

Comparisons are as bad as cliches.

Don't be redundant; don't use more words than necessary; it's highly superfluous.

Be more or less specific.

Understatement is always the absolute very best.

The passive voice is to be avoided.

Even if a mixed metaphor sings, it should be derailed.

Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

Don't never use a double negative.

And don't start a sentence with a conjunction.

A preposition is a terrible word to end a sentence with.

Writing carefully, dangling participles must be avoided.

If any word is improper at the end of a sentence, a linking verb is.

Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.

GAC
02-20-2010, 04:12 PM
So is it fungus or fungi?

nate
02-20-2010, 04:13 PM
So is it fungus or fungi?

It depends on if it's us or him.

:cool:

WebScorpion
02-20-2010, 05:38 PM
So is it fungus or fungi?
Fungoes. :thumbup:

Yachtzee
02-20-2010, 05:39 PM
The passive voice is to be avoided.



If it is to be desired that people be driven crazy, the passive voice should be used exclusively.

mth123
02-20-2010, 06:35 PM
To avoid the issues in this thread, I'm stickin with pig latin from here on in:

1. UbbsStay CF
2. OlenRay 3B
3. OttoVay 1B
4. UceBray RF
5. EstionmarkQuay LF
6. IllipsPhay 2B
7 AbreraCay SS
8. ErnandezHay C

ochre
02-20-2010, 06:47 PM
To avoid the issues in this thread, I'm stickin with pig latin from here on in:

1. UbbsStay CF
2. OlenRay 3B
3. OttoVay 1B
4. UceBray RF
5. EstionmarkQuay LF
6. IllipsPhay 2B
7 AbreraCay SS
8. ErnandezHay C
BIRays

mth123
02-20-2010, 06:50 PM
BIRays

IngoBay

BCubb2003
02-20-2010, 08:04 PM
Since RBI is a team-dependent stat, whatever the team says is fine with me. But shouldn't it be RsBedI? That's the problem with counting stats. Luckily, it's rare to refer to them in conversation by their abbreviations. Unless he Ked the side to get the W.

cincinnati chili
02-21-2010, 10:48 AM
I LOLed when I read this thread.

I ain't never seen such a fuss over usin' English in a proper manner.

Just having some fun. Those who say this isn't the biggest deal in the world are correct. But what bothers me about this particular change in the lexicon is that I get the sense about 15 years ago people started using "RBI" instead of "RBIs" to show that they were smarter than the rest of us. My thought on grammar and usage is that if you're going to use a form that sounds pretentious, you better make sure that you are using it correctly. In this case, (IMO) the people who started using the plural form RBI were incorrect. I recognize that dictionaries now say that both forms are acceptable, but IMO that's only the case because so many people have begun using the incorrect form.

mth123
02-21-2010, 10:53 AM
Just having some fun. Those who say this isn't the biggest deal in the world are correct. But what bothers me about this particular change in the lexicon is that I get the sense about 15 years ago people started using "RBI" instead of "RBIs" to show that they were smarter than the rest of us. My thought on grammar and usage is that if you're going to use a form that sounds pretentious, you better make sure that you are using it correctly. In this case, (IMO) the people who started using the plural form RBI were incorrect. I recognize that dictionaries now say that both forms are acceptable, but IMO that's only the case because so many people have begun using the incorrect form.

Stickin' with pig latin.

BIRays. The "unrays" are getting the plural where it belongs and the "s" is at the end. Everybody is happy that way.

cincinnati chili
02-21-2010, 10:53 AM
Is it "Attorney Generals", or "Attorneys General"? :cool:

It's the latter. Attorney is the noun and general is the adjective. Until Eric Holder puts on an outfit looking like Stormin' Norman Schwarzkopf, he will be merely an attorney, not a military officer.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/17/NormanSchwarzkopf.jpg/180px-NormanSchwarzkopf.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Eric_Holder_official_portrait.jpg/250px-Eric_Holder_official_portrait.jpg

cincinnati chili
02-21-2010, 10:58 AM
If we're going to be technical, shouldn't it be RsBI?

I read somewhere that the Brits use MsP as the plural acronym for "members of parliament." Can anyone confirm?

Hollcat
02-21-2010, 06:19 PM
You see that baseball game the other day? Yeah, the Reds scored a point in the 9th to win.

Gah. Annoys the crap out of me.

Who got the GW PBI?:D

Chip R
02-21-2010, 06:46 PM
I read somewhere that the Brits use MsP as the plural acronym for "members of parliament." Can anyone confirm?

I always thought it was MPs.

BCubb2003
02-21-2010, 07:42 PM
I always thought it was MPs.

I've seen MSP as Member of Scottish Parliament, but that's all.

macro
02-21-2010, 07:57 PM
I could be alone on this one, but I kinda have a problem with the redundancies found within:

PIN #
SSN #

Yep, you often hear people say "PIN number" and "ATM machine".


So is it fungus or fungi?

Oddly enough, "stadiums" is accepted as plural for "stadium". In fact, my Firefox browser spell checker highlights "stadia" as a misspelled word, while "stadiums" passes.

BCubb2003
02-21-2010, 08:01 PM
Yep, you often hear people say "PIN number" and "ATM machine".



Oddly enough, "stadiums" is accepted as plural for "stadium". In fact, my Firefox browser spell checker highlights "stadia" as a misspelled word, while "stadiums" passes.

Blame it on the mediums.

Tom Servo
02-21-2010, 10:28 PM
Yep, you often hear people say "PIN number" and "ATM machine".
Here's a relevant one that everyone uses: MLB Baseball.

GAC
02-22-2010, 04:49 AM
Good examples of redundancy being illustrated. I think the English language, especially when it comes to the use of acronyms, gets "butchered" easily because dialect can be regionally influenced.

So I may mispronounce Louisiana as WE -SEE- ANA, or even the "s" in Illinois, but I still got a leg up on that tech support guy from India named Steve. ;)

RFS62
02-22-2010, 06:53 AM
..... but I still got a leg up on that tech support guy from India named Steve. ;)

Next time I talk to a support tech in India who tells me his name is Jeff, I'm telling him my name is "Habib"

nate
02-22-2010, 08:32 AM
Good examples of redundancy being illustrated. I think the English language, especially when it comes to the use of acronyms, gets "butchered" easily because dialect can be regionally influenced.

So I may mispronounce Louisiana as WE -SEE- ANA, or even the "s" in Illinois, but I still got a leg up on that tech support guy from India named Steve. ;)

I think we should stamp out and abolish redundancy.

:cool:

Roy Tucker
02-22-2010, 08:36 AM
I think we should stamp out and abolish redundancy.

:cool:

I used to work in the department of redundancy department.

westofyou
02-22-2010, 09:43 AM
Eddie Olechek called the USA win over Canada last night, Tremendously Tremendous.

BCubb2003
02-22-2010, 09:47 AM
By the way, why do we say someone "flied out" ... what kind of a word is "flied"?

RANDY IN INDY
02-22-2010, 10:27 AM
A baseball word.

RBA
02-22-2010, 10:46 AM
Hey people, the plural of RBI is RBIs - STOP THE PRETENTIOUSNESS

Aren't you being "pretentiousness" by claiming as a matter of fact it is "RBIs"? :eek::D

I always thought it was RBIs, but I can see a case for it being RBI. But I think it should be RBA : Runs Batted All-in? :)

oneupper
02-22-2010, 11:54 AM
From the NYT Crossword Puzzle today

4-letter word for Slugger's Fig.

Guess what fits? :)

macro
02-22-2010, 12:33 PM
Here's a relevant one that everyone uses: MLB Baseball.

Oh, man, I see that on the Directv program guide all the time and the first thing that pops into my mind is "Major League Baseball Baseball".

:runaway:

Roy Tucker
02-22-2010, 01:03 PM
A survey of online dictionaries for RBI has it pretty well split between "run batted in" and "runs batted in".

It's a mystery wrapped in a riddle inside an enigma. An anagram of randiest bunt.

vaticanplum
02-22-2010, 07:17 PM
By the way, why do we say someone "flied out" ... what kind of a word is "flied"?

I think this is because...ok, I have to figure out how to say this correctly. Although "fly" is being used as a verb here, it's referring to a fly ball -- a noun. It's not referring to the past tense of the act, the verb, of flying.

You fly, you flew, you have flown. But that's not what's happened in this case; no one has flown anywhere. It's referring to the fly ball, so it has...flied.

There are always exceptions like this. The Maple Leafs are not the Maple Leaves, because, I think, it's a proper name and not an actual leaf. I've always wanted to find an example to refute this but I haven't yet. Dream big, kids.

I do think that if you say the full phrase of RBI, by the way, it should be runs batted in. But I don't have a problem with RBIs. Acronyms are tricky and we do what we can with them. The English language is flexible; that's why it's great.

RedsBaron
02-22-2010, 07:26 PM
It's getting trendy to say "RBI" to represent the plural of "RBI" (e.g. "Hack Wilson had 190 RBI in his best year."). I'm not sure when it started. The first guy I can remember doing it was Keith Olbermann back in his SportsCenter days.

Figures. Just about the only thing Olbermann has ever said that made any sense at all to me, and now I'm told he was wrong. :)

Big Klu
02-22-2010, 07:27 PM
I always say, "flew out".

Bob Borkowski
02-22-2010, 07:45 PM
Lou Smith, a sports writer for the Enquirer back in the day, often said skied out. :)

cincinnati chili
02-22-2010, 10:40 PM
Eddie Olechek called the USA win over Canada last night, Tremendously Tremendous.

My mother in law was sitting next to me aghast right as that came out of his mouth. I thought it was freakin' awesome.

BCubb2003
02-22-2010, 10:42 PM
My mother in law was sitting next to me aghast right as that came out of his mouth. I thought it was freakin' awesome.

Wouldn't that be awesomely awesome?

Yachtzee
02-23-2010, 01:27 AM
I once had an Austrian who was majoring in English tell me that it was improper to say I flew "on a plane" because it meant I was actually on top of the plane's fuselage during the flight. He suggested I say I flew "in a plane." I suspect he hadn't quite got to the part of the English language where they learn about idioms.

GAC
02-23-2010, 05:03 AM
I always say, "flew out".

Of what? :mooner:

BCubb2003
02-23-2010, 07:46 AM
I once had an Austrian who was majoring in English tell me that it was improper to say I flew "on a plane" because it meant I was actually on top of the plane's fuselage during the flight. He suggested I say I flew "in a plane." I suspect he hadn't quite got to the part of the English language where they learn about idioms.

That's like the difference between American and British English for being in line or on line, or on the street and in the street.

RedEye
02-23-2010, 07:52 AM
From the NYT Crossword Puzzle today

4-letter word for Slugger's Fig.

Guess what fits? :)

Well, that settles it. Will Shortz is the MAN.

cincinnati chili
02-24-2010, 12:25 AM
I once had an Austrian who was majoring in English tell me that it was improper to say I flew "on a plane" because it meant I was actually on top of the plane's fuselage during the flight. He suggested I say I flew "in a plane." I suspect he hadn't quite got to the part of the English language where they learn about idioms.

If you haven't seen it, George Carlin did a great routine that encompassed this idiom....

I'm not getting ON the plane.... Let Evil Kinevil get ON the plane.... I'm getting IN the plane.

GAC
02-24-2010, 04:24 AM
If you haven't seen it, George Carlin did a great routine that encompassed this idiom....

I'm not getting ON the plane.... Let Evil Kinevil get ON the plane.... I'm getting IN the plane.

Juuuuummmmbo....shrimp. :lol:

Carlin's Everyday Expressions.... http://www.videosift.com/video/george-carlin-everyday-expressions-and-sayings

Ron Madden
02-24-2010, 04:35 AM
I always say, "flew out".

Me too.