PDA

View Full Version : More positive reaction on Chapman



Pages : [1] 2

OnBaseMachine
03-04-2010, 07:09 PM
I'll just start a new thread for this since there's probably going to be a lot of news on Chapman in the next few days and I'll try to keep it all on one thread.

Chapman continues to impress
By C. Trent Rosecrans, CNATI.com Posted March 4, 2010 6:39 PM ET

GOODYEAR, Ariz. - Even Aroldis Chapman is slightly surprised at how he's pitched so far in Reds camp.

After striking out two in an inning of work in Thursday's intrasquad game at Goodyear Ballpark, Chapman admitted he's doing better than he thought he might in the big leagues.

"I thought it wouldn't go as well as it has, but I have worked hard on my control and my command and it's working out pretty well," Chapman said, through an interpreter-reporter, Jorge Ortiz of USA Today.

Chapman said he didn't have any nerves on Thursday, the first day he's thrown in game-like situations in more than a eight months, but after a couple of early control issues, a double by Yonder Alonso and hitting Todd Frazier in the right leg, Chapman struck out the final two batters he faced, Ryan Hanigan and Wilkin Castillo.

"Chapman threw the ball great, threw it over the plate and it was live," Reds manager Dusty Baker said. "If he gets the ball over the plate, he's going to be hard to hit. But he did keep the ball down, which is a big plus."

Chapman threw two balls to start off against Balentien, before getting the right fielder to foul off a pitch and then ground out to shortstop Orlando Cabrera. The next batter, Alonso, too the first pitch he saw - a fastball on the outside corner - the other way into the corner in left for a double. Chapman said it was a good pitch, but Alonso, who was also born in Cuba, put a good swing on the ball.

Frazier was then hit on the first pitch he saw from Chapman, a 95-mph fastball. Frazier suffered a bruised right quadriceps, but no X-rays were needed. He will be evaluated again on Friday.

With men on first and second, Chapman showed why the Reds signed him to the six-year, $30.25 million deal and why he may just have taken the lead for the Reds' fifth starter position when the team breaks camp in a month.

"It seems like when hitters step in there, he's real focused, he look great. He pitched me tough, real hard, sinking two-seamers and then surprised me with two cutters in that he could throw for a strike," Hanigan said. "To be able to throw that pitch to righties, or even lefties, inside for a strike reminds me of a guy like Randy Johnson. He's got the loose arm and he was throwing strikes. He elevated with two strikes on me, got it up and as hard as he throws, that's all he has to do. The velocity speaks for itself."

Chapman got Hanigan to swing at a high fastball for a third strike.

"I saw a lot of consistency in his delivery of both his fastball and his breaking ball. He was throwing two of the low, hard fastballs and two cutters right where he should have," Hanigan said. "That's just one at-bat, but to see the fact that he has the potential to control his hard pitches in and his off-speed pitches is outstanding. He's just got to keep doing what he's doing."

The radar gun readings in the park showed him throwing as fast as 97 mph, and he actually threw harder out of the stretch. Chapman said he wasn't worried about what the radar gun said, refusing the information when offered to him.

The final batter he faced, Castillo, had caught Chapman before, but said it was much different to face him with a bat in his hand, and something he doesn't want to experience again anytime soon.

Castillo saw the gas, but it was a changeup that got him swinging - a changeup that came in at 82 mph.

"It's nasty," Castillo said. "He threw me one (changeup) and I had no chance. Nasty."

From safely in the dugout, pitching coach Bryan Price also liked what he saw.

"Impressive, you guys all saw it," Price said. "It's a terrific fastball and he threw a great changeup to his last hitter for his final out, we know the slider is progressing nicely. ... I saw a guy that was around the plate with three pitches, his arm looks live, he's athletic around the mound and I certainly wasn't disappointed in any way."

Chapman will face the Kansas City Royals on Monday at Goodyear Ballpark, but he won't start.

"If we pitch him later, fans stick around and drink more beer," Baker said.

If he continues to pitch like he has this spring, there could be a lot of beer sold at Great American Ballpark next month.

http://cnati.com/spring-training-2010/chapman-continues-to-impress-001431/

OnBaseMachine
03-04-2010, 07:10 PM
Chapman is the real deal

By Hal McCoy
FOX Sports Ohio
March 4, 2010

GOODYEAR, Ariz. — For all but two members of the Cincinnati Reds, the coming out party of 22-year-old Cuban defector Aroldis Chapman was a blow-out-the-candles and stab the pinada success.

Chapman spun the radar gun numbers up to 97 miles an hour with his fastball and sprinkled 12 strikes into his 17-pitch one-inning debut today during an intrasquad game in Goodyear Stadium.

And who couldn’t be happy about it?

Well, Todd Frazier, for one. It was a re-enactment of the Muhammad Ali-George Frazier boxing match in which broadcaster Howard Cosell screamed into his microphone, “Down goes Frazier, down goes Frazier,” when Ali knocked out Frazier.

Todd Frazier was the third batter to face Chapman and the first pitch, clocked at 95 miles an hour, struck Frazier on the back of the right knee and once again it was, “Down goes Frazier.”

He left the game, suffering a bruised muscle and later limped gamely to his car in the parking lot.

The second unhappy camper was opposing catcher Wilkin Castillo. He faced the last pitch Chapman threw, a change-up. And he struck out.

“He throws hard, man,” said Castillo. “He threw me three fastballs that I fouled off (the third of which broke his bat), then he threw me that change-up and I had no chance. He throws 98 miles an hour on his fastballs, then 84 miles an hour with his change-ups. I’d rather catch him than try to hit him.”

Veteran catcher Ramon Hernandez did catch him – and hit a home run off Opening Day starter Aaron Harang as the home team Whites defeated the visiting team Grays, 4-2.

“That change-up he threw was good and now he has to work on his control,” said Hernandez. “That’s all it is. He missed on a few guys and was overthrowing a little bit, maybe. Remember, though, he hasn’t thrown in eight months. He fixes that up and he’ll be set.

“He always throws hard and I thought he really threw well trying to pound the strike zone with his fastballs,” said Hernandez. “He has worked a lot on keeping his pitches down and did that well.”

Chapman, a lean and not-really-mean lefthander at 6-4, 185 pounds, seemed to take it all in with a smile and a few shrugs.

Speaking through an interpreter, fellow Cuban and minor-league pitching coach Tony Fossas, Chapman said, “I felt good about my fastball, felt good about my location and felt good about everything that is going on right now.”

And about that pitch that nearly de-knee-capitated Frazier, Chapman said, “I was trying to throw the ball inside. Nothing intentional. I just was trying to throw inside. It didn’t scare me at all, but it isn’t something I don’t want to do to a teammate.”

About the change-up to Castillo, he said, “I feel good about it because I’ve been working hard on it and it is going to get better.”

In addition to hitting Frazier and striking out Castillo, he also struck out Ryan Hanigan and gave up an opposite field bloop double to Yonder Alonso.

Asked if Alonso hit a good pitch, Chapman smiled and said, “Si.”

Pitching coach Bryan Price was overtly pleased but not shocked.

“Impressive,” he said. “A terrific fastball and threw a real nice change-up to strike out his last hitter. We know his slider is progressing nicely. I saw a guy around the plate with three pitches (fastball, slider, change-up) and an arm that is live.

“We’re not bringing in a guy who has never pitched, some guy hidden away some place and we brought him here and said, ‘Hey, let’s make him a pitcher.’”

No, they didn’t. Chapman was a well-known pitcher for the Cuban National team and it only cost the Reds $30.25 million to have him affix his name to a contract.

So far, so good – so very good.

http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/landing/?blockID=191248&feedID=5264

OnBaseMachine
03-04-2010, 08:25 PM
Frankie Piliere (former MLB scout) of AOL Fanhouse was in attendance today and came away very impressed with Chapman. Here are some of his comments from twitter.

I think if I was re-doing the top 100 today Chapman would be #2

To answer all asking yeah Chapman looked that good. You just don't find lefties that have that type of stuff, that body, and that easy velo

When asked if Chapman compares more to Randy Johnson or Clayton Kershaw: Johnson. More of that lefty decepting and I think he can live 95 MPH

Like I told others, the stuff isn't going anywhere. With that type of stuff, it's impossible not to put him that high. Its that rare

When asked how he would rate Chapman's chaneup: Potential plus (6) pitch. Can't grade it there yet but at 14 MPH differential + fade it's got big potential

http://twitter.com/FrankiePiliere

It sounds like his changeup has come a long way. Is Soto working his magic again?

Hoosier Red
03-04-2010, 09:14 PM
Frankie Piliere (former MLB scout) of AOL Fanhouse was in attendance today and came away very impressed with Chapman. Here are some of his comments from twitter.

I think if I was re-doing the top 100 today Chapman would be #2

To answer all asking yeah Chapman looked that good. You just don't find lefties that have that type of stuff, that body, and that easy velo

When asked if Chapman compares more to Randy Johnson or Clayton Kershaw: Johnson. More of that lefty decepting and I think he can live 95 MPH

Like I told others, the stuff isn't going anywhere. With that type of stuff, it's impossible not to put him that high. Its that rare

When asked how he would rate Chapman's chaneup: Potential plus (6) pitch. Can't grade it there yet but at 14 MPH differential + fade it's got big potential

http://twitter.com/FrankiePiliere

It sounds like his slider has come a long way. Is Soto working his magic again?

I thought Soto only threw a Fastball and Change up. Has he helped others with their Sliders?

OnBaseMachine
03-04-2010, 09:19 PM
I thought Soto only threw a Fastball and Change up. Has he helped others with their Sliders?

Doh! I meant to say changeup, not slider. My fault.

OnBaseMachine
03-05-2010, 12:52 AM
Great article by Jorge Ortiz of USA Today...

Cuban defector Chapman, 22, sparks hype, hope for Reds
By Jorge L. Ortiz, USA TODAY

GOODYEAR, Ariz. — Cincinnati Reds pitcher Johnny Cueto, the father of three young kids, was extolling the joys of having a family when he asked new teammate Aroldis Chapman six lockers away about his relatives.

Chapman, a left-hander who signed a six-year, $30.25 million contract seven months after defecting in July, said his family stayed in his native Cuba.

"You don't have anybody here?" asked Cueto, who hails from the Dominican Republic.

"No, I'm by myself here."

"You have to bring your family. It's good to be with your family, your mom. Do you have any kids?"

"A girl. I haven't met her."

"You haven't met her?"

"No, because she was born right when I was leaving."

Then the starting pitchers, centerpieces of the Reds' plans to bolster their rotation and build around youth, showed each other cellphone pictures of their kids.

Their Spanish-language conversation captures some of the challenges Chapman faces in living up to the Reds' hopes and the considerable hype building around him.

Baseball fans have been hearing about his 100-mph fastball since last year's World Baseball Classic, when Chapman pitched for the Cuban national team.

Many have followed the saga of the promising pitcher who walked away from his past during an amateur tournament in the Netherlands, became a free agent and landed with the Reds, a small-market team that stunned observers by outbidding the competition.

Frequently mentioned but less appreciated are the off-field difficulties inherent in making such a drastic life change: learning a new language and culture, adjusting to new food and surroundings, plus accepting that a family reunion might be a long time in coming.

Chicago White Sox shortstop Alexei Ramirez left Cuba with his wife and kids in 2007, but the rest of his family stayed behind, and he still feels their absence.

"You wonder how well they're eating back home, what they lack for," Ramirez says. "And you always need your dad's embrace, your mom's caress. We have everything, but we miss those little things that are more important."

Chapman left his girlfriend, Raidelmis Mendosa, and their 8-month-old daughter, Ashanti Brianna, in addition to his parents and two older sisters.

"At first it was hard not to see them, because I had never spent so much time away from my house. I had always lived with them," Chapman, 22, says in Spanish. "But I'm getting used to it now. When I'm alone and start thinking about my family, I can call them. I'm getting accustomed to being independent."

The Reds have tried to make the transition easier by assigning former major league reliever and Class A pitching coach Tony Fossas, also a Cuban native, to serve as Chapman's "guardian" and interpreter during spring training.

The club's numerous Hispanic players — including first-base prospect Yonder Alonso, who left Cuba at 11 — also provide a support system. And it helps that manager Dusty Baker speaks Spanish.

"It also helps I played with a number of Cuban players," Baker says. "I think I understand the culture possibly as well or better than most people around."

Ultimately, it's up to Chapman to assimilate. English still is a foreign concept, but he seems increasingly comfortable with his teammates, even those who don't speak Spanish. He has also embraced some of the trappings of American life, including rap music, fancy shoes and iPhones. He has yet to buy a car.

"Not everybody has a car in Cuba," Chapman says. "It's not like here where teenagers have cars. Life's very different. There, if you need to go someplace, you take the bus. Here, you jump in your car."

Major league changes

Impressive spring workouts have caught his teammates' attention and buoyed Chapman's spirits and probably his chances of making the team, although early indications are he will open the season in the minors to ease his adjustment.

Chapman pitched a scoreless inning in an intrasquad game Thursday, his first game action in more than eight months, and will make his Cactus League debut Monday against the Kansas City Royals.

He's facing significant changes from the type of game he's used to.

"In Cuba, you get ready to play 90 games. Here, you get ready for 162," says Royals catcher Brayan Pena, who defected at 17. "In Cuba, the starters pitch every six days. Here, it's every five. He's got the talent. He just needs to learn the game here, study opposing hitters, watch lots of video, read the scouting reports. You don't have that in Cuba."

Chapman already has debunked some of the early perceptions about him, including questions about his secondary pitches and receptiveness to coaching.

Reds general manager Walt Jocketty, who is building the club around a foundation of young pitching in hopes of ending a stretch of nine consecutive losing seasons, suggests those doubts might have been spread by teams competing for his services. Jocketty points out that, besides the crackling fastball, Chapman has shown a sharp slider and an improved curve and changeup.

Fossas says Chapman fixed a flaw in his mechanics after a quick glance at the television.

"He told me he'd never seen himself on video, but one time in Cuba he was watching the news and he saw himself make one pitch, and based on that he was able to correct his mechanics," Fossas says. "That was the big difference between what we'd heard, that he didn't throw strikes, and what we're seeing now."

Difficult episodes

For all of the raves, there have been some stumbles.

Chapman displayed little maturity in a WBC game against Japan when, upset over ball-strike calls, he visibly fumed on the mound. His stats for the tournament: a 0-1 record and a 5.68 ERA in 6⅓ innings over two starts.

Even Ramirez, who played with Chapman for two years on the Cuban national team and predicts he'll become a star in short order, says Chapman will have to learn to control his emotions on the field.

"He can't get upset with the umpires," Ramirez says. "That's something he'll need to deal with, because the strike zone here is tighter."

In November, Chapman fired his original agent, Edwin Mejia, who helped him establish residency in the small European country of Andorra to facilitate his free agency. He's represented by Hendricks Sports Management, which Mejia's agency, Athletes Premier International (API), sued in December, alleging "malicious interference." SI.com reported Tuesday that the parties have reached an out-of-court settlement.

The sudden switch in representation raised red flags around baseball, though perhaps not as much as photos that made the Internet rounds showing Chapman alongside lingerie-clad women at a Boston club. They were posted on the API Facebook page, and Chapman says the episode marked the breaking point in a relationship that was starting to sour.

"People might have thought I was partying all the time," Chapman says. "I only went because his (Mejia's) friends invited him and they said they wanted to meet me. So I said OK and went, and look what happened."

If Chapman has been partying frequently, his lean, athletic body has yet to show the effects. At 6-4, 185 pounds, and with huge hands, he has the kind of build that can fling high-velocity fastballs with little apparent effort.

His youth and fresh arm set him apart from previous Cuban pitchers who reached the majors past their prime, such as Jose Contreras, Orlando "El Duque" Hernandez and Rene Arocha, all of whom logged heavy innings before defecting.

Chapman, who converted from first base to pitching at 15, threw 341⅔ innings in four-plus seasons in Cuba's National Series, making him less prone to future injury. His overall record was 24-21 with a 3.72 ERA and two strikeout titles but also 210 walks.

"When Dr. (Timothy) Kremchek did the physical and did the MRI of the shoulder and the elbow, he said it was unbelievable how pristine it was," Jocketty says.

Chapman's mind is relatively fresh as well, at least when it comes to life in the USA, where he has lived for about five months. His biggest surprise has been his newfound freedom to express his thoughts without fear of governmental repercussion.

"It's a relief not to have to worry that this guy might be watching you or that the other one might be listening to what you say so he can pass it along," Chapman says. "I don't have to worry about that anymore."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/nl/reds/2010-03-04-chapman-reds-pitcher_N.htm

Mario-Rijo
03-05-2010, 01:11 AM
That last piece by Ortiz is a good one and some nuggets I had not heard before.

BCubb2003
03-05-2010, 08:59 AM
"He told me he'd never seen himself on video, but one time in Cuba he was watching the news and he saw himself make one pitch, and based on that he was able to correct his mechanics," Fossas says. "That was the big difference between what we'd heard, that he didn't throw strikes, and what we're seeing now.

That's pretty amazing.

redsmetz
03-05-2010, 09:13 AM
That last piece by Ortiz is a good one and some nuggets I had not heard before.

Yes, I agree. One story from yesterday had Ortiz giving a translation for Chapman during the interview. The bit with Cueto seems to be an access that Anglo reporters wouldn't have.

One thing that jumped out at me was the Royals catcher mentioning Cuban pitchers only going every six days. I wondered whether we'll have to watch his innings more closely. It also occurred to me though that I read somewhere that Cuban players are used to playing over more of the year. We'll have to see.

Chip R
03-05-2010, 09:55 AM
"You don't have anybody here?" asked Cueto, who hails from the Dominican Republic.

"No, I'm by myself here."

"You have to bring your family. It's good to be with your family, your mom. Do you have any kids?"

"A girl. I haven't met her."

"You haven't met her?"

"No, because she was born right when I was leaving."


Man, that's got to be so tough to make a decision to defect like that when you know your child is about to be born.

OnBaseMachine
03-05-2010, 10:42 AM
C. Trent has video of Chapman's full inning yesterday:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7YtVmS4zus&feature=player_embedded

membengal
03-05-2010, 11:02 AM
The difference in speed on the change up to K Castillo compared to the gas was really noteworthy from that angle. And Hanigan was reeealll late on his swinging K. Good stuff.

TRF
03-05-2010, 11:10 AM
Tripods are like $30.

just sayin'.

membengal
03-05-2010, 11:15 AM
Tripods are like $30.

just sayin'.

I'm not biting the hand that feeds. As between Cloverfield and nothing, I am okay with Cloverfield and it got steadier as the pitches wore on.

17 pitches, 12 for strikes. Not half bad. And no one really comfortable digging in after Frazier, I would guess...

dougdirt
03-05-2010, 01:13 PM
Tripods are like $30.

just sayin'.

Probably the only time Trent is sitting in the stands the rest of the year.

REDblooded
03-05-2010, 02:17 PM
Has anybody drummed up the nickname "The Cuban Missile Crisis" yet?

OnBaseMachine
03-05-2010, 03:04 PM
Full Scouting Report of Aroldis Chapman
3/05/2010 2:30 PM ET By Frankie Piliere

Frankie Piliere is a National Baseball Analyst for FanHouse.

GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- We all had a pretty good idea that Aroldis Chapman had a world of talent. Besides that vague idea about him, however, there was very little known in the scouting community about the mysterious Cuban left-hander. That mystery was solved Thursday.

So, just how good did Aroldis Chapman turn out to be? Was he worth the investment? Many of those questions obviously can't be answered yet. But we now have a very good idea about what the Reds saw and why they shelled out big money for him. The reason was simple: the talent is as good as it gets.

Traditionally, you need to see more from a player than a short intrasquad appearance to write a scouting report. Without a larger sample size, it's unfair to make conclusions about what a player will be. But, there are always observations to be made. Here is what I saw from Chapman on Thursday in Goodyear.

Physical Description: Chapman's lanky frame has been one of the few not so mysterious aspects of the Cuban southpaw's game. His body is going to play a major role in how he develops long-term. This is a fast-twitch muscle type of guy, and he does what he does -- throwing in the upper-90s -- because of this long, lean athleticism. His broad shoulders and baggy jersey give him the appearance of a coat hanger, and you have to figure he will add some bulk to his frame, but his long limbs and athleticism are what make him such a talent.

Mechanics: There is nothing unnatural about Chapman's delivery. What you look for in a raw pitcher like him is any awkwardness in his mechanics. It appears that the Reds have not tried to put his delivery into a cookie cutter. They are allowing the imperfections in his delivery to exist, at least for now. There are problems and inconsistencies with his mechanics but nothing glaring that could clearly lead to injury or durability issues. He makes mistakes, but more importantly he has a smooth arm action and appears to be putting minimal effort into pitching, even though he's reaching the upper-90s with the fastball.

The inconsistencies show up especially when he throws his changeup. While he threw some excellent ones, he also telegraphed a couple of others. Overall, though, that doesn't represent a major concern.

Fastball: This is where the conversation will always begin with Chapman. Try listing the left-handed pitchers over the years that could potentially live at 94-98 mph as a starting pitcher. That's what Cincinnati fans should be excited about. The first pitch Chapman threw as he warmed up before his inning of work was 96 mph, and given the minimal effort he put into it, it really says something about his strength.

Following a warm-up session that saw him living at 95-97 mph with the fastball, Chapman clearly took his foot off the gas pedal as the first hitters came to the plate. That also revealed another layer to his game. Coming down to 92-94 mph initially, he showed the ability to spot his fastball exceptionally well. Of course, you don't want him sacrificing velocity, but this lull definitely exposed another positive aspect of his game. After surrendering a long opposite-field double off the bat of Yonder Alonso, suddenly the huge velocity numbers returned. He began sitting at 96-97 mph, reaching as high as 98 with plus life through the strike zone.
On a consistent basis, hitters had fastballs on them quicker than they anticipated, showing the late hop on Chapman's fastball. There are pitchers that have plus velocity, but the velocity does not play as well against live opponents. Chapman is not one of those pitchers. He showed that he can consistently put an electric fastball by the bats of big-league hitters. One side note: Chapman appeared to be more comfortable from the stretch at times and produced a little more velocity there than he did from the windup.

Slider: The slider is what's going to make it very tempting for the Reds to put Chapman in the show right out of spring training. Sitting at 86-88 mph, he has a true slider with two-plane break. The break is late and sharp, and if he can learn to locate it consistently, it's a nearly unhittable offering against both left- and right-handed hitters. He left a couple up in the zone, but when they were down there was plenty of flinching, check swings, and jelly legs at the plate. If he can refine his command, this is a 7 pitch on the 2-8 scouting scale.

Changeup: Chapman's changeup is the obvious surprise in his repertoire. Word was he had the fastball and slider, but the changeup is a revelation. He's going to need to be far more consistent at selling his arm action and staying through the pitch. He spun off a couple of them in warm-ups and lost them high and away to his arm side. He threw some outstanding ones on the edges of the plate against live hitters, however. All coming in at 82 mph, it's going to be downright unfair to big-league hitters if he can throw this pitch for strikes. It has the fading action and differential to one day grade out as a plus offering.


***

The Reds could put Aroldis Chapman in the major league bullpen right now and probably get some great things out of him. He'd have his bad days simply because he's not consistent enough yet with his mechanics and does appear to lack focus at times, but for the most part he'd simply overwhelm hitters on pure stuff. His repertoire is that dynamic.

That does not, however, make it the right course of action. Chapman has the makings of three plus pitches, and a chance to be very durable given his large frame and how easily he produces velocity. He should be developed in the minors for a period of time as a starter. Backing up third base, not getting lazy with his mechanics and learning when to slow the game down when things go wrong -- these are all things Chapman has to work on and struggled with in his spring training debut. He has flaws that should be fixed.

Let's look at the big picture, though. Chapman, at 100 percent effort, could be a starting pitcher with a 94-98 mph fastball, a plus slider in the upper-80s, and a plus changeup in the low-80s. With that type of repertoire, his tall frame, and his handedness, there is almost no precedent. Is he raw? Most definitely. Given his inconsistencies could he flame out? Yes. But, this is the type of talent you invest your money in, because it just does not come along often.

http://mlb.fanhouse.com/2010/03/05/full-scouting-report-of-aroldis-chapman/

REDblooded
03-05-2010, 06:04 PM
That was a great article OBM...

OnBaseMachine
03-05-2010, 11:58 PM
Asked who had helped him improve his changeup after an impressive session facing live hitters for the first time in more than eight months, Chapman put his arm around Fossas and said, "My new mate here."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/2010-03-03-young-pitchers_N.htm

Blitz Dorsey
03-06-2010, 12:57 AM
Has anybody drummed up the nickname "The Cuban Missile Crisis" yet?

Dude, you're killing me. I have nicknamed him "The Cuban Missile (no crisis)" in several threads ... get with the program.

;-)

Only the batters that have to face him will be dealing with any sort of "crisis."

Scrap Irony
03-06-2010, 09:57 AM
With that type of repertoire, his tall frame, and his handedness, there is almost no precedent. Is he raw? Most definitely. Given his inconsistencies could he flame out? Yes. But, this is the type of talent you invest your money in, because it just does not come along often.

http://mlb.fanhouse.com/2010/03/05/full-scouting-report-of-aroldis-chapman/

Hehehe.

This makes me giddy.

traderumor
03-06-2010, 10:57 AM
Man, that's got to be so tough to make a decision to defect like that when you know your child is about to be born.Hopefully he's paying child support ;) Maybe James Brooks could give him some peer support.

OnBaseMachine
03-07-2010, 05:39 PM
Chapman ready to take big stage
Hard-throwing Cuban set for spring debut
By Mark Sheldon / MLB.com

03/07/10 4:27 PM EST

GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- Much like the unveiling of a highly-anticipated concept car at the auto show, the Reds will debut their big and bold investment on Monday.

For the first time this spring, when the Reds play the Royals at Goodyear Ballpark, Cuban pitching sensation Aroldis Chapman will face batters wearing different uniforms and his stadium performance will be open to the public.

Chapman, who is competing for the fifth spot in Cincinnati's rotation, will work out of the bullpen behind starter Bronson Arroyo against Kansas City during the 2:05 p.m. CT game.

"He'll be all right," Reds catcher Ramon Hernandez said. "He's been playing baseball a long time. It'll be exciting to see him and see how he does."

Since Spring Training has opened, Chapman has gone through the regular paces of any other pitcher in camp. The 22-year-old has thrown in bullpen sessions and live batting practice vs. teammates. He also pitched one scoreless inning against Reds hitters on Thursday in an intrasquad game that was closed to the public.

Moving to a bigger stage shouldn't negatively affect Chapman, as far as Reds manager Dusty Baker was concerned.

"If you've pitched in front of the world and you've pitched for food, you know what I mean? I expect him to do well,' Baker said on Sunday. "I don't think any league he's going to play in will compare to that, when you've pitched for food."

Because of Sunday's rainout against the Brewers, the Reds juggled their pitching assignments and briefly assigned Chapman to start a "B" game Monday morning on a practice field. Then it was quickly decided to put Chapman back on the list to face Kansas City. Homer Bailey will start the "B" game instead.

"We thought this would get [Chapman] more acclimated," Baker said. "We'll let Chapman pitch in the big arena."

Several members of the national media are expected to turn out to see Chapman's spring debut, which won't be televised. For months, there has been intense interest in the young and unpolished left-hander from Cuba, who is able to throw a fastball 100 mph.

Chapman defected from Cuba in July during a tournament in the Netherlands. After he was declared a free agent in September, numerous teams watched him work out and the bidding for his services was brisk. Quietly, the Reds remained in the hunt the whole time and shocked everyone when they emerged as the team to land Chapman with a six-year deal worth $30.25 million.

Cincinnati's front office has maintained that it will give Chapman a legitimate look for the fifth spot, partially depending on how he adjusts to big league life and American culture. Starting in the Minors is also a viable option. How he does in game situations will also play a large role in the decision-making process.

Micah Owings, Matt Maloney, Travis Wood, Justin Lehr and Mike Lincoln are also competing for the fifth spot.

Through the first few weeks of camp, Chapman has pleasantly surprised the Reds by being more advanced than expected. Many reports knocked his lack of secondary pitches beyond the fastball, but Chapman has shown great command of his changeup and slider and has repeatedly baffled the Reds' hitters that have stepped into the box.

"I feel good about the camp so far and I feel good about my condition," Chapman said through an interpreter. "I feel really good about the changeup. I'm working really hard on it and I think it's going to get better."

During Thursday's intrasquad, Chapman threw 17 pitches, including 12 for strikes. His only hit allowed was a Yonder Alonso double. Chapman twice reached 97 mph on the radar gun and dipped down with an 82-mph changeup that tied up batter Wilkin Castillo's bat into knots. The only mistake the pitcher made was nailing Todd Frazier in the right leg with a 95-mph fastball. Frazier had to come out of the game but would be OK.

Now, it will be the Royals' turn to see what they can do against Chapman.

"I've never seen him throw but he's throwing Monday and hopefully I'll get a chance to see what he's got," Royals first baseman Billy Butler said. "Not many people throw 100 miles an hour, let alone a lefty, so I think he deserves everything he got. That's an impressive arm."

The only member of the Royals that knows what hitters might be dealing with is catcher Brayan Pena, who is also a Cuban defector. Before Chapman signed, Pena caught one of his bullpen sessions in Miami.

Other Cuban Major Leaguers like Kendry Morales and Yuniesky Betancourt were also present and Pena noted that everyone was in awe.

"His fastball has got tremendous life and he's got pretty good control," Pena said. "I was so impressed. Kendry Morales was hitting against him in live BP and he was telling me that he hasn't seen a left-hander that throws that hard in a while in the big leagues or the Dominican or in Triple-A. He was pretty impressive -- he's probably 6-foot-4 or 6-5 and he's got pretty long arms and when he pitches, he looks like he's giving you a handshake. That's how close you see him.

"I hope he has a great career in the big leagues. He's a very good kid."

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100307&content_id=8707104&vkey=news_cin&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

icehole3
03-08-2010, 07:16 AM
I believe today we see the 100mph heater, thats my prediction http://www.sternfannetwork.com/forum/images/smilies/Happy/HappyWave.gif

klw
03-08-2010, 08:57 AM
I believe today we see the 100mph heater, thats my prediction http://www.sternfannetwork.com/forum/images/smilies/Happy/HappyWave.gif

Well maybe we will hear it. Was it Ryan or Feller where there was the story about the umpire calling a ball and then telling the catcher that it sounded wide.

What is spanish for "Sidd Finch"?

membengal
03-08-2010, 09:23 AM
Put this in the updates thread, and I will note it here as well:

For those of you with MLB Audio, the "A" game with the Royals (and Chapman's spring debut) can be heard from the Royals broadcast crew on mlb.com.

Big Klu
03-08-2010, 03:27 PM
Well maybe we will hear it. Was it Ryan or Feller where there was the story about the umpire calling a ball and then telling the catcher that it sounded wide.

What is spanish for "Sidd Finch"?

El Cid Pinzón. :D

redsmetz
03-08-2010, 03:36 PM
Well maybe we will hear it. Was it Ryan or Feller where there was the story about the umpire calling a ball and then telling the catcher that it sounded wide.

What is spanish for "Sidd Finch"?

In Ken Burns' Baseball, he tells the story as Lefty Grove was batting against Fellder and was called out on strikes. He is reported to have said, "that last one sounded low" or some such wording.

membengal
03-08-2010, 04:17 PM
Soooo...2 IP 26 pitches 15 for strikes 3 Ks 1 BB 1 hit and no runs for Chapman against the Royals this afternoon.

Oh, and Fay just tweeted that a scout had Chapman at 102 and 100 during two pitches in the outing.

So, yeah.

The 100 was registered on a strike three pitch to Getz to start the 4th per a follow-up tweet from Fay.

Sea Ray
03-08-2010, 04:36 PM
Oh, and Fay just tweeted that a scout had Chapman at 102 and 100 during two pitches in the outing.




A left hander throwing 100 and 102???

He's not human

membengal
03-08-2010, 04:38 PM
Fay just tweeted again that Reds had Chapman at 99 on their gun. So readings on the top end for him today ranged between 99 and 102.

I believe that can be described as "sudden".

westofyou
03-08-2010, 04:43 PM
In Ken Burns' Baseball, he tells the story as Lefty Grove was batting against Fellder and was called out on strikes. He is reported to have said, "that last one sounded low" or some such wording.

here that story

Will M
03-08-2010, 06:17 PM
from what little i have seen of Chapman he not just throws 100 mph but he has movement on his pitches. late movement is especially good. 100mph & late movement from a LH pitcher is incredibly rare in the bigs. batters are going to have a really hard time hitting him. if he has control with 3 pitches (100mph fastball, 88 mph slider & changeup) then he is going to be very special!

think about this for a second. a rotation spot that had Matt Maloney's name pencilled in gets taken over by a #1 starter. instead of 2 solid vets & 2 promising youths & a rookie instead we have a #1 starter & 2 solid vets & 2 promising youths. can you say playoffs? yeah baby, its spring & i can get excited about the dream!

reds44
03-08-2010, 06:21 PM
He hit 102 on the gun?

Oh. My. God.

AND HE'S LEFT HANDED

Homer Bailey
03-08-2010, 06:36 PM
He hit 102 on the gun?

Oh. My. God.

AND HE'S LEFT HANDED

C'mon man, I don't have any more room left on my sig!

membengal
03-08-2010, 06:39 PM
An unconfirmed 102 for an unnamed scout. A 100 confirmed from another scout. Regardless, fast. The mph sequence to strike out Getz to start the 4th was apparently 94, 96, and then 100. The 100 was looking.

klw
03-08-2010, 06:41 PM
from Keith Law
http://twitter.com/keithlaw

Two word scouting report on Aroldis Chapman: That'll work.

contrast with his report on Farnsworth

If my options with Farnsworth are the rotation or the bullpen, I'd release him.

RedsManRick
03-08-2010, 07:40 PM
I must say. The feeling I have about Chapman is the same one I had about Junior: "This doesn't feel right. When is the other shoe going to drop?" Let's hope it doesn't.

Cedric
03-08-2010, 07:53 PM
I must say. The feeling I have about Chapman is the same one I had about Junior: "This doesn't feel right. When is the other shoe going to drop?" Let's hope it doesn't.

When debating prospects it's easier to be "right" by saying someone is going to fail. It will make you look smarter in the future.

BCubb2003
03-08-2010, 07:58 PM
I must say. The feeling I have about Chapman is the same one I had about Junior: "This doesn't feel right. When is the other shoe going to drop?" Let's hope it doesn't.

Things this good aren't supposed to happen to the Reds, are they?

membengal
03-08-2010, 08:12 PM
Geez, Brantley sure not throwing any cold water on the day's work for Chapman on McAllister's show in the 8:05 segment. Talking about the poise and confidence, and how little chance the Royals generally had against him. He finished the thought with this:

"Left-handers have no chance against him."

BCubb2003
03-08-2010, 08:35 PM
I do wonder how it is that many teams studied him, agreed that he was raw and lacked command but had great upside, and by the time he got to spring training he had seen himself on television, lightning struck, and he showed up with off-the-charts ability and very few flaws. Does he have Maravilla del Muchacho tattooed on his arm?

Sea Ray
03-08-2010, 08:58 PM
Geez, Brantley sure not throwing any cold water on the day's work for Chapman on McAllister's show in the 8:05 segment. Talking about the poise and confidence, and how little chance the Royals generally had against him. He finished the thought with this:

"Left-handers have no chance against him."

Apparently Alonzo does. He doubled one into the gap against him a few days ago

Sea Ray
03-08-2010, 09:00 PM
from Keith Law
http://twitter.com/keithlaw


contrast with his report on Farnsworth

Farnsworth is an example of a 100 MPH guy who never was worth a darn. Did the scout say what Farnsworth was hitting on the gun today?

lollipopcurve
03-08-2010, 09:21 PM
Apparently Alonzo does. He doubled one into the gap against him a few days ago

Not exactly. He hit it down the leftfield line. One writeup described it as a bloop.

Sea Ray
03-08-2010, 09:36 PM
Not exactly. He hit it down the leftfield line. One writeup described it as a bloop.

I stand corrected.

I see there is a video of his hit as shakey as it might be, earlier in this thread but it does look like he sliced it down the LF line on the first pitch. Smart on Alonzo's part. It was probably going to be his best chance to get wood on the ball. As a LH you don't want to spend too much time staring at those intimidating pitches

Hoosier Red
03-08-2010, 09:45 PM
From Redszone favorite Joe Poz.

http://joeposnanski.com/JoeBlog/2010/03/08/aroldis-chapman-cincinnati/
Player of the Day: Aroldis Chapman, pitcher, Cincinnati.


GOODYEAR, Az. – We live in a world where there just aren’t many surprises. We know who will win the Academy Awards before they win. We hear about the best college football and basketball players long before they reach college. We hear rumors about the remarkable capabilities of the iPad months before the thing comes out.

So, no, there just aren’t too many revelations in our lives.

Maybe that is why the spring training phenom still electrifies us. Here it is, a cool gray day in Arizona. The Cincinnati Reds play the Kansas City Royals. There are a couple thousand people in the stands, maybe. There’s no buzz in the stands. How could there be any buzz? The Reds and Royals playing on a Monday afternoon in a spring training game under gray skies in Arizona?

And then: Aroldis Chapman steps on the mound. You have probably heard Chapman’s story. He is a 22-year-old left-handed pitcher from Cuba. He tried to defect from Cuba in 2008, was arrested, was given a reprieve and then successfully defected in Amsterdam. He eventually signed with the Cincinnati Reds for more than $30 million, which seems like a startling amount of money for someone who has never pitched in the big leagues.

And then: You watch Aroldis Chapman pitch.

“I mean, holy cow,” says longtime Kansas City scout Art Stewart.

Holy cow. There was a time in baseball when baseball phenoms would just show up, when blazing fast and switch-hitting sluggers would wander out of the Oklahoma mines and 17-year-old pitchers throwing 100 mph would walk off of farms in Iowa. But now – you can follow baseball prospects through high school, through college, through the minor leagues, you can see film on them on the Internet, you can hear scouts talk about them, you can find prospect lists that go all the way to No. 2,000.

And then here comes Chapman. He’s tall and lean – he looks taller than the 6-foot-4 that is listed in the media guide. He picks up the baseball to warm up, and he throws so easy, like he’s skipping a rock on a lake. The ball popped hard into the glove. The next one popped harder. Kansas City manager Trey Hillman was only half joking when he used that old line about how Chapman’s pitches “sounded good.” They really did sound good.

But the amazing part was the ease … there was no grunting, no straining, no laboring. You hear that line all the time about athletes who look as if they were born to do something. Chapman struck out David DeJesus on a hard-sweeping slider that seemed to break two feet. He struck out Chris Getz on a 100-mph fastball that sliced the outside corner – anyway Stewart clocked the pitch at 100 mph. Another scout clocked it at 102. Another got it at 98. Chris Getz’s speed approximation: “It was moving.”

Two batters later Chapman struck out Rick Ankiel on a slider that Ankiel missed by so much he had to be rebooked on a later flight. Watching Ankiel trying to hit Chapman was somewhere between comedy and tragedy; you got the sense that if Ankiel faced Chapman 100 times, he would strike out 100 times.

The Ankiel at-bat was especially poignant because there was a time, not long ago, when Ankiel was that left-handed pitching phenom, the 19-year-old kid who had struck out 416 batters in just 298 minor league innings. No, you never know exactly how the phenom’s story will play out.

On a day like this, really, anything seems possible.

“I would say Chapman has the best young left-handed arm I’ve seen since Herb Score,” Art Stewart says, and here he is referring back to one of my heroes, Score, who as a 22 and 23-year-old for the Cleveland Indians led the American League in strikeouts. That was in 1955 and 1956. Score seemed to be on his way to becoming one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history – Sandy Koufax before Sandy Koufax – when he got hit in the eye on a line drive by Gil McDougald.

But, Art Stewart concedes, even the Herb Score comparison isn’t quite right because Score had a famously violent motion. Chapman makes you think he could throw 115 mph if he was really trying.

Chapman has already made his goals known: He wants to be the best pitcher in the world. So, sure, he was thoroughly unimpressed by his two-inning, one hit, three strikeout game in Goodyear where he may or may not have hit 100 mph on the radar gun.

“I wasn’t worried about how hard I threw,” he said. “But I did (throw 100), it’s just one of those things.”

It’s a funny thing: Every year, there are a couple of teams that are hot preseason choices, and this year’s teams seem to be Seattle and Cincinnati. The Reds have a good and fairly young middle of the lineup – Jay Bruce, Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips – some promising young pitchers like Johnny Cueto and Homer Bailey and a couple of proven veterans like Scott Rolen and Aaron Harang.

The Reds, like most teams trying to break through after a long dry spell, could use something amazing to happen. And here’s Aroldis Chapman, a pitcher longtime Reds announcer Marty Brennaman calls the best arm he has seen come through in 30 years. Here’s a left-handed pitcher with a 100 mph fastball and a desire to be the best ever. Here’s a real live phenom, out of nowhere, the kind baseball used to have.

“Well, hey, they did spend $30 million on him,” Art Stewart says. “But I would say they got their money’s worth.”

TheNext44
03-08-2010, 09:47 PM
I must say. The feeling I have about Chapman is the same one I had about Junior: "This doesn't feel right. When is the other shoe going to drop?" Let's hope it doesn't.

To be honest, there was reason to be skeptical of the Junior trade at the time.

When Junior signed his first big deal with Seattle in 97, I was upset, knowing that the Reds would never get him in his prime. When they did get him, when he was 30, I hoping the Reds could get one or maybe two years out of him as one of the best players in the game, but expected him to be less than that during most of his contract. What happened was less than what I expected, but I still didn't expect him to be "The Kid" for most of his 10 year contract.

With Chapman, except for the usual doubts that come with all young pitchers who haven't played in the majors yet, there really is no reason to be skeptical.

dougdirt
03-08-2010, 09:53 PM
Not exactly. He hit it down the leftfield line. One writeup described it as a bloop.

Former Rangers scout said it was a long double (http://twitter.com/FrankiePiliere/status/9989149805).

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 12:00 AM
Are we still allowed to post blog posts?

Chapman’s first outing is first-rate
Posted by jfay March 8th, 2010, 5:29 pm

Aroldis Chapman hit at least 100 in his first outing of the spring. One scout mentioned 102 to a reporter. That couldn’t be confirmed.

But his velocity was what impressed his mentor Tony Fossas the most.

“To me, 102 is incredible,” Fossas said. “The most important thing today is I saw him nice and relaxed, standing nice and tall. He was finishing up his pitches. His slider was very good again.”

for more click on the link
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 12:01 AM
Go ahead and get excited
Posted by jfay March 8th, 2010, 7:31 pm

My friend Dude called about 10 minutes after I came up from the field after talking to Dusty Baker.

He wanted to express his love and admiration for Aroldis Chapman. He was riding the buzz create as details of Chapman’s spring debut flowed over the web. I usually try to curb his enthusiasm a bit when he gets worked up about his beloved Reds.

But I didn’t this time.

for more click on the link
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/

Spring~Fields
03-09-2010, 12:13 AM
With Chapman, except for the usual doubts that come with all young pitchers who haven't played in the majors yet, there really is no reason to be skeptical.

:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

Spring~Fields
03-09-2010, 12:19 AM
I must say. The feeling I have about Chapman is the same one I had about Junior: "This doesn't feel right. When is the other shoe going to drop?" Let's hope it doesn't.

I get the sense that there won't be any other shoe dropping on this young man, and that he has an outstanding present and future ahead of him. I think that he is one of the rare ones that come along every once in awhile.

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 12:20 AM
From Redszone favorite Joe Poz.

http://joeposnanski.com/JoeBlog/2010/03/08/aroldis-chapman-cincinnati/
Player of the Day: Aroldis Chapman, pitcher, Cincinnati.


GOODYEAR, Az. – We live in a world where there just aren’t many surprises. We know who will win the Academy Awards before they win. We hear about the best college football and basketball players long before they reach college. We hear rumors about the remarkable capabilities of the iPad months before the thing comes out.

So, no, there just aren’t too many revelations in our lives.

Maybe that is why the spring training phenom still electrifies us. Here it is, a cool gray day in Arizona. The Cincinnati Reds play the Kansas City Royals. There are a couple thousand people in the stands, maybe. There’s no buzz in the stands. How could there be any buzz? The Reds and Royals playing on a Monday afternoon in a spring training game under gray skies in Arizona?

And then: Aroldis Chapman steps on the mound. You have probably heard Chapman’s story. He is a 22-year-old left-handed pitcher from Cuba. He tried to defect from Cuba in 2008, was arrested, was given a reprieve and then successfully defected in Amsterdam. He eventually signed with the Cincinnati Reds for more than $30 million, which seems like a startling amount of money for someone who has never pitched in the big leagues.

And then: You watch Aroldis Chapman pitch.

“I mean, holy cow,” says longtime Kansas City scout Art Stewart.

Holy cow. There was a time in baseball when baseball phenoms would just show up, when blazing fast and switch-hitting sluggers would wander out of the Oklahoma mines and 17-year-old pitchers throwing 100 mph would walk off of farms in Iowa. But now – you can follow baseball prospects through high school, through college, through the minor leagues, you can see film on them on the Internet, you can hear scouts talk about them, you can find prospect lists that go all the way to No. 2,000.

And then here comes Chapman. He’s tall and lean – he looks taller than the 6-foot-4 that is listed in the media guide. He picks up the baseball to warm up, and he throws so easy, like he’s skipping a rock on a lake. The ball popped hard into the glove. The next one popped harder. Kansas City manager Trey Hillman was only half joking when he used that old line about how Chapman’s pitches “sounded good.” They really did sound good.

But the amazing part was the ease … there was no grunting, no straining, no laboring. You hear that line all the time about athletes who look as if they were born to do something. Chapman struck out David DeJesus on a hard-sweeping slider that seemed to break two feet. He struck out Chris Getz on a 100-mph fastball that sliced the outside corner – anyway Stewart clocked the pitch at 100 mph. Another scout clocked it at 102. Another got it at 98. Chris Getz’s speed approximation: “It was moving.”

Two batters later Chapman struck out Rick Ankiel on a slider that Ankiel missed by so much he had to be rebooked on a later flight. Watching Ankiel trying to hit Chapman was somewhere between comedy and tragedy; you got the sense that if Ankiel faced Chapman 100 times, he would strike out 100 times.

The Ankiel at-bat was especially poignant because there was a time, not long ago, when Ankiel was that left-handed pitching phenom, the 19-year-old kid who had struck out 416 batters in just 298 minor league innings. No, you never know exactly how the phenom’s story will play out.

On a day like this, really, anything seems possible.

“I would say Chapman has the best young left-handed arm I’ve seen since Herb Score,” Art Stewart says, and here he is referring back to one of my heroes, Score, who as a 22 and 23-year-old for the Cleveland Indians led the American League in strikeouts. That was in 1955 and 1956. Score seemed to be on his way to becoming one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history – Sandy Koufax before Sandy Koufax – when he got hit in the eye on a line drive by Gil McDougald.

But, Art Stewart concedes, even the Herb Score comparison isn’t quite right because Score had a famously violent motion. Chapman makes you think he could throw 115 mph if he was really trying.

Chapman has already made his goals known: He wants to be the best pitcher in the world. So, sure, he was thoroughly unimpressed by his two-inning, one hit, three strikeout game in Goodyear where he may or may not have hit 100 mph on the radar gun.

“I wasn’t worried about how hard I threw,” he said. “But I did (throw 100), it’s just one of those things.”

It’s a funny thing: Every year, there are a couple of teams that are hot preseason choices, and this year’s teams seem to be Seattle and Cincinnati. The Reds have a good and fairly young middle of the lineup – Jay Bruce, Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips – some promising young pitchers like Johnny Cueto and Homer Bailey and a couple of proven veterans like Scott Rolen and Aaron Harang.

The Reds, like most teams trying to break through after a long dry spell, could use something amazing to happen. And here’s Aroldis Chapman, a pitcher longtime Reds announcer Marty Brennaman calls the best arm he has seen come through in 30 years. Here’s a left-handed pitcher with a 100 mph fastball and a desire to be the best ever. Here’s a real live phenom, out of nowhere, the kind baseball used to have.

“Well, hey, they did spend $30 million on him,” Art Stewart says. “But I would say they got their money’s worth.”

Great, great piece by Posnanski. Thanks for posting that hoosier.

membengal
03-09-2010, 12:25 AM
Look, folks, how do you know a player is potentially special? It's the little things. Fay and others have alluded to it, that players stop to watch. Proof? That pic from Jamie Ramsey in the pics thread, and I will try to post it here:

http://ramsey.mlblogs.com/assets_c/2010/03/DSC01055-thumb-500x375-1839391.jpg

Just spend a second marveling at the Reds' dugout. Look again. 3rd or 4th inning of pre-season game #3, friends. Not game #3 of the World Series.

That pic gives me chills as a fan. The good kind of chills.

membengal
03-09-2010, 12:30 AM
OBM, on the linking stuff, I have written on a blog for about seven years now, and have long since been comfortable that a link with a highlight of what is in the link is fair use. Even with a blog post, if you are not sure if it's okay, give the link and maybe a paragraph and leave it to the reader to click over for the whole thing.

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 12:33 AM
A couple more articles, this one from Yahoo:


Ankiel, a former pitcher with the same kind of lively arm back in the day, said Chapman throws harder than most lefties and used sliders with two different breaks. He also cuts his fastball — something Getz did not expect — and once followed up a pitch in the upper 90s with an 80-mph change-up.

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/blog/big_league_stew/post/Aroldis-Chapman-hits-100-mph-strikes-out-three-?urn=mlb,226703

This one is from the Chicago Tribune:


Strasburg, the Nationals' $15 million first-rounder, has been described by Baseball America as a "once-in-a-generation'' talent. He's a special prospect, no doubt, but better than Chapman?

I'll believe it when I see it

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/ct-spt-0309-rogers-on-baseball--20100308,0,2512132.column

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 12:37 AM
Look, folks, how do you know a player is potentially special? It's the little things. Fay and others have alluded to it, that players stop to watch. Proof? That pic from Jamie Ramsey in the pics thread, and I will try to post it here:

http://ramsey.mlblogs.com/assets_c/2010/03/DSC01055-thumb-500x375-1839391.jpg

Just spend a second marveling at the Reds' dugout. Look again. 3rd or 4th inning of pre-season game #3, friends. Not game #3 of the World Series.

That pic gives me chills as a fan. The good kind of chills.

Yep. Bronson Arroyo hung around after his start to watch Chapman, according to Mark Sheldon.


Arroyo normally heads back to the clubhouse right after finishing spring starts but stuck around in the dugout to watch Chapman work from the top step.

"As uncomfortable as a guy like myself can be at this time of year, for him to be coming from where he's coming from and just getting used to crowds being around and knowing everybody is watching him, for him to throw strikes and not walk too many guys is pretty good," Arroyo said.

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100308&content_id=8714614&vkey=news_cin&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

Blitz Dorsey
03-09-2010, 12:42 AM
I believe today we see the 100mph heater, thats my prediction http://www.sternfannetwork.com/forum/images/smilies/Happy/HappyWave.gif

That, sir, is a good prediction.

But what's the big deal? Don't we always have a 6-foot-4, 22-year-old lefty in camp that can throw 100 MPH every spring training? No? Oh, alright, never mind. Now I see what all the fuss is about. :D

Blitz Dorsey
03-09-2010, 12:56 AM
Yep. Bronson Arroyo hung around after his start to watch Chapman, according to Mark Sheldon.

Of course he did. Third from the left.

Blitz Dorsey
03-09-2010, 12:58 AM
Look, folks, how do you know a player is potentially special? It's the little things. Fay and others have alluded to it, that players stop to watch. Proof? That pic from Jamie Ramsey in the pics thread, and I will try to post it here:

http://ramsey.mlblogs.com/assets_c/2010/03/DSC01055-thumb-500x375-1839391.jpg

Just spend a second marveling at the Reds' dugout. Look again. 3rd or 4th inning of pre-season game #3, friends. Not game #3 of the World Series.

That pic gives me chills as a fan. The good kind of chills.

Love it. I can't believe I am this excited about the Reds. The good news is that the team is built for the future, so it's not like this year is do-or-die. But there is the chance that this could be a really fun year ... with even bigger things on the horizon.

WVRedsFan
03-09-2010, 01:25 AM
GOODYEAR, Ariz. -- This Aroldis Chapman thing makes no sense. The guy's fastball is a blur. His motion is wonderfully fluent whenever he takes the mound with his lanky frame of 6-foot-4 and 185 pounds. He is left-handed -- and in case you didn't know, baseball folks lose their minds over southpaws who throw hard. Plus, he just turned 22, which means he has years to remain good or even great.

I mean, here is Chapman, supposedly with the gifts to evolve into the next big thing among pitchers, and the New York Yankees didn't get him.

Neither did the Boston Red Sox, the New York Mets, the Los Angeles Dodgers, Chicago Cubs or any of those teams on the pricey side of baseball's financial universe. In contrast, the Cincinnati Reds join the traditional bargain hunters (as in cheapskates, either by necessity or by choice) on the other side.

So Chapman went to . . . the Reds?

While the Reds have nine consecutive losing seasons, the Yankees and the Red Sox have five pennants and two world championships during that stretch. Still, two months ago, the Reds convinced Chapman to sign a six-year contract for $30.25 million. Then, during his Cactus League debut on Monday at Goodyear Ballpark, he used the combination of his pitches and his poise to show that he is more than hype.

You know, with the Reds.

"It really does kind of make you wonder if there is some kind or problem here with this kid, because the Yankees, for instance, are a club that would go out and outbid everybody if they felt this guy was going to be a phenom," said George Foster, a blast from Cincinnati's Big Red Machine past. He was in town for the spring game to sign autographs for those visiting at a table beyond the third-base stands.

Consider that Chapman is scheduled to make more than the total rosters of Foster's 1975 and 1976 Reds teams that captured back-to-back world championships with three Hall of Fame players, a Hall of Fame manager and Pete Rose, baseball's all-time hits leader who also should be in Cooperstown.

Foster chuckled, adding, "Before, it was like the Reds didn't have any money, and now, all of a sudden, they've got the money. That's strange. And I also think those other clubs want to win right now. They don't want to put that kind of investment into somebody who is going to be in the minor leagues for a four- or five-year period. They want somebody who can help them win immediately."

The thing is, if you go by Monday, when Chapman kept making Kansas City Royals hitters look silly, the Reds just snookered their peers by grabbing somebody who could be significant right now.

During Chapman's two innings, he watched the first hitter he faced single, and he allowed a walk. He also had two strikeouts.

Here's the main thing: In addition to flashes of goodness with his slider and his changeup, his fastballs really were fast. According to the speed gun of one major-league scout, some of Chapman's 26 pitches reached 97, 98 and 100 mph.

That same scout clocked one at 102 mph.

When it comes to left-handers, Steve Carlton didn't throw that hard, and neither did Sandy Koufax. Some say Herb Score often reached the 100s during the 1950s, which means Chapman could join a category of two.

"I wasn't trying to throw any harder or anything like that," said Chapman, shrugging, who doesn't speak English. His translator was fellow native Cuban Tony Fossas, the Reds' Single-A pitching coach who operates as Chapman's unofficial guardian.

Said Chapman through Fossas, "If I did throw a pitch that fast, it was just one of those things."

Added Reds manager Dusty Baker, also shrugging, "It's hard to tell how fast he's throwing, because he throws so easy. He doesn't put a lot of effort into it, so it's hard to tell how hard he's throwing, but he threw well."

Except for that walk, Chapman also threw under control, which was one of his big question marks. The other involved temperament since he has a reputation for becoming agitated by the slightest thing. He was composed on Monday, and he has been so throughout his stay with the Reds so far.This already is a splendid story.

Chapman pitched for Cuba's national team, and he even was named the top left-handed pitcher for the 2007 Baseball World Cup. But here's the intriguing stuff: Last summer, despite Castro's tight grasp around the team, he slipped away toward freedom when they were playing in the Netherlands. It wasn't without a mighty cost for Chapman, though, since he left behind friends and family members, including a pregnant girlfriend who gave birth to an eight-month-old daughter that he has yet to see.

It's just that Chapman has this dream of pitching in the big leagues. According to Fossas, he is doing everything mentally and physically to make it happen.

"First of all, he's very smart. He's very bright, and he already brought pretty solid mechanics with him," Fossas said. "He's a workaholic, and with the technology that we have here, he's only going to get better. We have a video room, and he had never seen himself pitch in that fashion. He's going to use that to his advantage, and as we've seen throughout camp, the issue isn't control anymore.

"The other thing is, growing up in Cuba under a tough situation, and then going through that defection, hey, that takes a lot of guts. That also takes a lot of a heart leaving your family behind and not knowing what the future is going to bring.

"I think for him, this is a piece of cake."

Not good news for opposing hitters.

Nor for the Yankees and others who let him get away.

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 01:26 AM
Video of Chapman speaking to reporters after the game (from FoxSportsOhio.com):

http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/video?PID=8n3h3d7BZLXx9JyCAN0XJLoibNT5j8Iy

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 01:45 AM
OBM, on the linking stuff, I have written on a blog for about seven years now, and have long since been comfortable that a link with a highlight of what is in the link is fair use. Even with a blog post, if you are not sure if it's okay, give the link and maybe a paragraph and leave it to the reader to click over for the whole thing.

That'll work. I edited my posts.

BearcatShane
03-09-2010, 03:19 AM
I am ecstatic to have this guy!

Ron Madden
03-09-2010, 03:27 AM
From Redszone favorite Joe Poz.

http://joeposnanski.com/JoeBlog/2010/03/08/aroldis-chapman-cincinnati/
Player of the Day: Aroldis Chapman, pitcher, Cincinnati.


GOODYEAR, Az. – We live in a world where there just aren’t many surprises. We know who will win the Academy Awards before they win. We hear about the best college football and basketball players long before they reach college. We hear rumors about the remarkable capabilities of the iPad months before the thing comes out.

So, no, there just aren’t too many revelations in our lives.

Maybe that is why the spring training phenom still electrifies us. Here it is, a cool gray day in Arizona. The Cincinnati Reds play the Kansas City Royals. There are a couple thousand people in the stands, maybe. There’s no buzz in the stands. How could there be any buzz? The Reds and Royals playing on a Monday afternoon in a spring training game under gray skies in Arizona?

And then: Aroldis Chapman steps on the mound. You have probably heard Chapman’s story. He is a 22-year-old left-handed pitcher from Cuba. He tried to defect from Cuba in 2008, was arrested, was given a reprieve and then successfully defected in Amsterdam. He eventually signed with the Cincinnati Reds for more than $30 million, which seems like a startling amount of money for someone who has never pitched in the big leagues.

And then: You watch Aroldis Chapman pitch.

“I mean, holy cow,” says longtime Kansas City scout Art Stewart.

Holy cow. There was a time in baseball when baseball phenoms would just show up, when blazing fast and switch-hitting sluggers would wander out of the Oklahoma mines and 17-year-old pitchers throwing 100 mph would walk off of farms in Iowa. But now – you can follow baseball prospects through high school, through college, through the minor leagues, you can see film on them on the Internet, you can hear scouts talk about them, you can find prospect lists that go all the way to No. 2,000.

And then here comes Chapman. He’s tall and lean – he looks taller than the 6-foot-4 that is listed in the media guide. He picks up the baseball to warm up, and he throws so easy, like he’s skipping a rock on a lake. The ball popped hard into the glove. The next one popped harder. Kansas City manager Trey Hillman was only half joking when he used that old line about how Chapman’s pitches “sounded good.” They really did sound good.

But the amazing part was the ease … there was no grunting, no straining, no laboring. You hear that line all the time about athletes who look as if they were born to do something. Chapman struck out David DeJesus on a hard-sweeping slider that seemed to break two feet. He struck out Chris Getz on a 100-mph fastball that sliced the outside corner – anyway Stewart clocked the pitch at 100 mph. Another scout clocked it at 102. Another got it at 98. Chris Getz’s speed approximation: “It was moving.”

Two batters later Chapman struck out Rick Ankiel on a slider that Ankiel missed by so much he had to be rebooked on a later flight. Watching Ankiel trying to hit Chapman was somewhere between comedy and tragedy; you got the sense that if Ankiel faced Chapman 100 times, he would strike out 100 times.

The Ankiel at-bat was especially poignant because there was a time, not long ago, when Ankiel was that left-handed pitching phenom, the 19-year-old kid who had struck out 416 batters in just 298 minor league innings. No, you never know exactly how the phenom’s story will play out.

On a day like this, really, anything seems possible.

“I would say Chapman has the best young left-handed arm I’ve seen since Herb Score,” Art Stewart says, and here he is referring back to one of my heroes, Score, who as a 22 and 23-year-old for the Cleveland Indians led the American League in strikeouts. That was in 1955 and 1956. Score seemed to be on his way to becoming one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history – Sandy Koufax before Sandy Koufax – when he got hit in the eye on a line drive by Gil McDougald.

But, Art Stewart concedes, even the Herb Score comparison isn’t quite right because Score had a famously violent motion. Chapman makes you think he could throw 115 mph if he was really trying.

Chapman has already made his goals known: He wants to be the best pitcher in the world. So, sure, he was thoroughly unimpressed by his two-inning, one hit, three strikeout game in Goodyear where he may or may not have hit 100 mph on the radar gun.

“I wasn’t worried about how hard I threw,” he said. “But I did (throw 100), it’s just one of those things.”

It’s a funny thing: Every year, there are a couple of teams that are hot preseason choices, and this year’s teams seem to be Seattle and Cincinnati. The Reds have a good and fairly young middle of the lineup – Jay Bruce, Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips – some promising young pitchers like Johnny Cueto and Homer Bailey and a couple of proven veterans like Scott Rolen and Aaron Harang.

The Reds, like most teams trying to break through after a long dry spell, could use something amazing to happen. And here’s Aroldis Chapman, a pitcher longtime Reds announcer Marty Brennaman calls the best arm he has seen come through in 30 years. Here’s a left-handed pitcher with a 100 mph fastball and a desire to be the best ever. Here’s a real live phenom, out of nowhere, the kind baseball used to have.

“Well, hey, they did spend $30 million on him,” Art Stewart says. “But I would say they got their money’s worth.”



That's what I call a very well written article. Thanks for sharing it with us.

:thumbup:

lollipopcurve
03-09-2010, 07:26 AM
Great article from Joe Poz. A new era in Reds baseball is dawning.

redsmetz
03-09-2010, 07:49 AM
Here's the link to the Kansas City's paper regarding yesterday's game. Apparently their catcher Brayan Pena was who was called to catch Chapman when he was auditioning for clubs.

http://www.kansascity.com/2010/03/08/1799051/royals-take-first-crack-at-reds.html

cumberlandreds
03-09-2010, 07:58 AM
You really have to pinch yourself and say "Is this guy really a Red?" It's going to be fun to follow his progress in the spring to see if he goes back to Cincy with the big club. I'm betting that he does.

klw
03-09-2010, 08:19 AM
How's this for a comp for Chapman?

Vida Blue
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vida_Blue


Blue was a southpaw power pitcher. He possessed a breaking curveball that he threw on occasion and an above average change-up, but his signature pitch was a blistering fastball that dialed up to nearly 100 miles per hour.[5] In The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers, all-time hits leader Pete Rose stated that Blue 'threw as hard as anyone' he had ever faced,[6] and baseball historian Bill James cited Blue as the hardest-throwing lefty, and the second hardest thrower of his era, to only Nolan Ryan.[7]

Obviously he doesn't have the curve yet but does the slider.
Maybe Steve Carlton as another comp.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/print?id=1822135&type=story
Steve Carlton went 27-10 with a terrible team one year in there, throwing high fastballs (the slider didn't become his best pitch until two years later). We have quotes about Steve Carlton when he first came up, comparing him to Sandy Koufax-but, since he is Carlton, those kind of quotes don't even make the file for him, because there is so much other stuff. Which is better evidence about the quality of his fastball: 27 wins, 300 strikeouts, or some guy thirty years later talking about what an awesome fastball David Clyde threw that one afternoon?
Not putting the bar high or anything.

icehole3
03-09-2010, 09:11 AM
That, sir, is a good prediction.

But what's the big deal? Don't we always have a 6-foot-4, 22-year-old lefty in camp that can throw 100 MPH every spring training? No? Oh, alright, never mind. Now I see what all the fuss is about. :D

thx, my next prediction is Walt puts him in the starting rotation opening day http://www.sternfannetwork.com/forum/images/smilies/Happy/HappyWave.gif

BCubb2003
03-09-2010, 10:04 AM
thx, my next prediction is Walt puts him in the starting rotation opening day http://www.sternfannetwork.com/forum/images/smilies/Happy/HappyWave.gif

Too bad they've already given the Opening Day envelope to Harang.

membengal
03-09-2010, 10:13 AM
Keith Law filed his report after yesterday here:

http://insider.espn.go.com/mlb/blog?name=law_keith&id=4978560

You have to be insider to get it, but if you are, enjoy. If not, a brief snippet:


There are big-league starters who look like they're playing catch when they pitch, like Livan Hernandez; there are almost no big-league pitchers who look like they're playing catch at 96 or 98 mph. But Chapman does. His arm is loose and quick, and he makes a relatively easy thrower like Steven Strasburg look high-effort by comparison.

In terms of mechanics, Chapman takes an enormous stride towards the plate and pronates his arm reasonably early; the arm path isn't long and there's no violence or other major red flags in the delivery. If he stays healthy, he's a number-one starter, and should be able to come north with the Reds in some role this year if they want him on the big-league roster.

He described the slider as absolutely toxic, with a sharp break and sitting at 87-90, or what a normal left-hander sends plateward for a fastball. He raved in general about the ease of the delivery.

cumberlandreds
03-09-2010, 10:25 AM
Too bad they've already given the Opening Day envelope to Harang.

Opening Day is a guaranteed sell out no matter who starts. Pitch Chapman day two or three and pack the house for a 2nd time. :)

nate
03-09-2010, 11:51 AM
Look, folks, how do you know a player is potentially special? It's the little things. Fay and others have alluded to it, that players stop to watch. Proof? That pic from Jamie Ramsey in the pics thread, and I will try to post it here:

http://ramsey.mlblogs.com/assets_c/2010/03/DSC01055-thumb-500x375-1839391.jpg

Just spend a second marveling at the Reds' dugout. Look again. 3rd or 4th inning of pre-season game #3, friends. Not game #3 of the World Series.

That pic gives me chills as a fan. The good kind of chills.

Nice observation.

Although maybe somebody cut one in the dugout.

:cool:

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 11:57 AM
Jamie Ramsey mentioned this on his blog - Imagine a hitter having to face Chapman's 100 mph fastball and then a couple innings later facing Daniel Ray Herrera's 68 mph screwball. Talk about messing your timing up.

icehole3
03-09-2010, 12:18 PM
Too bad they've already given the Opening Day envelope to Harang.

What Im saying is he'll go north, I know Harang's the starter

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 01:15 PM
John Fay discusses Chapman's debut on Sportscenter:

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/recap?gameId=300308117

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 01:18 PM
From C. Trent's twitter:

Next Chapman day, Friday at Dodgers, and then he'll pitch on the 17th, but not sure which game

Something kind of odd about watching Aroldis Chapman sitting on the couch watching the Strasburg debut in the #Reds clubhouse

http://twitter.com/cnatist10

REDblooded
03-09-2010, 01:38 PM
Strasburg made his debut today... 27 pitches, 15 strikes, 2 ks, 2 hits... topped out at 98... who's better now? HUH!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Caveat Emperor
03-09-2010, 01:41 PM
Just when I thought Josh Hamilton would be the most fun I'd ever have following a spring training, along comes Aroldis Chapman. :)

Incidentally -- it'd be borderline criminal if Chapman and Strasburg don't face one another at some point this year.

dougdirt
03-09-2010, 01:56 PM
Strasburg made his debut today... 27 pitches, 15 strikes, 2 ks, 2 hits... topped out at 98... who's better now? HUH!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Strasburg. 4 combined innings in spring training isn't going to change that.

lollipopcurve
03-09-2010, 01:58 PM
Strasburg. 4 combined innings in spring training isn't going to change that.

Understood. You have Alonso as a better prospect too.

REDblooded
03-09-2010, 01:59 PM
Strasburg. 4 combined innings in spring training isn't going to change that.

hyperbole...

11larkin11
03-09-2010, 02:08 PM
Chapman, Strasburg, and Heyward: The Rebirth of the NL

RBA
03-09-2010, 02:35 PM
Can't wait until May when he's called up.

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 02:43 PM
Fay - Bryan Price on Chapman:


“It’s not unrealistic to see (him making the club),” Price said. “But in the same respect, there’s a lot of spring to go. There’s a lot of decisions to be made. I don’t think that decision that’s going to make until we get a lot closer to end, and there’s a lot more involved that performance. But, right now, I hope he forces our hand.

click on the link for the rest:

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/09/price-on-chapman-i-hope-he-forces-our-hand/

dougdirt
03-09-2010, 03:15 PM
Understood. You have Alonso as a better prospect too.

I am starting to change my stance. I have seen more video on him. We have more reports on him. I have talked to scouts who have seen him in person now.

lollipopcurve
03-09-2010, 03:23 PM
I am starting to change my stance. I have seen more video on him. We have more reports on him. I have talked to scouts who have seen him in person now.

You've either changed it or you haven't, right?

OnBaseMachine
03-09-2010, 05:33 PM
Fay - Jocketty on Chapman's chances


“We can’t let one or two outings sway our decisions,” Jocketty said. ”I don’t think our position has changed. We’re still evaluating. Our plan is the same. We’ll put him out there every few days and continue to have Bryan (Price) work on things he’s work on. We’re still trying to address the cultural issues (Chapman) has to deal with. We’ll see how it goes.”

For the rest of the post:
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/09/jocketty-on-chapmans-chances/

Caveat Emperor
03-09-2010, 05:35 PM
TRANSLATION:

Don't get your hopes up -- we structured his contract this way for a reason.

MikeS21
03-09-2010, 06:51 PM
TRANSLATION:

Don't get your hopes up -- we structured his contract this way for a reason.
And, I think the Reds would be silly to not bring Chapman along at a speed that gives the team the best contract in terms of length. I don't think we ought to worry too much about printing World Series tickets for 2010.

The pitching may be exciting, but until the offense proves it can score runs, it won't matter if your staff ERA is 2.50. They are going to lose a LOT of 1-0, 2-1 games until the team scores runs.

Let this team prove it can score 5-6 runs every night, then I'm all for bringing in Chapman ASAP.

11larkin11
03-09-2010, 08:40 PM
I don't think we ought to worry too much about printing World Series tickets for 2010.

...says the Rays fan between the 2007 and 2008 seasons.

TheNext44
03-09-2010, 08:51 PM
I've said this before and will keep saying it.

The only factor in the decision where to play Chapman is what is best for his development long term. Contract, roster space, team record, ticket sales all should be irrelevant to that one key question.

REDblooded
03-09-2010, 10:04 PM
I've said this before and will keep saying it.

The only factor in the decision where to play Chapman is what is best for his development long term. Contract, roster space, team record, ticket sales all should be irrelevant to that one key question.

I'm not 100% sure about that... imo, Reds need to make the best decision in regards to what he can do for the term of their current contract... If Chapman reaches his ultimate potential, I really can't see a scenario where they open up their pocketbooks a second time... Votto, Bruce, Cueto, Bailey will all have to be re-signed around the same time as Chapman, and the Reds will be forced to make some decisions... If all 5 hit their potential, I suspect Chapman will probably cost another 20-30 million more than the other 4...

Scrap Irony
03-09-2010, 10:27 PM
If all five hit their potential, the Reds will win multiple World Series and be able to sustain a payroll similar to St. Louis, Atlanta, and other mid-market teams.

That team, with those five near their ceilings, would be a better team than the Braves put up in the 90's. It would be a true dynasty. And fans love a winner.

mbgrayson
03-10-2010, 01:15 AM
And here is more John Fay stoking the fires of bringing up Chapman:

Buzz Growing for Chapman (http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20100309/SPT04/3100365/):
Chapman has pitched better than any other contender for the fifth spot in the starting rotation. He also has the best stuff by far....Maybe the most impressive thing about Chapman is the progress he's made each time he's pitched. His second bullpen session was better than the first; his debut was better than his outing in the intrasquad game.

Wow, BOTH of Chapman's innings were good. We need to hose Fay down a little...Serious case of infatuation developing. Let's wait and see him pitch 5 or 6 innings in one game, and see how he does. Also, keep that contract and it's complications (http://mlb.fanhouse.com/2010/01/12/aroldis-chapmans-contract-with-cincinnati-is-complicated/)in mind.

fearofpopvol1
03-10-2010, 06:50 AM
Fay - Jocketty on Chapman's chances



For the rest of the post:
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/09/jocketty-on-chapmans-chances/

And thank goodness too. The Reds simply cannot afford to enter the Super 2 status situation with Chapman. They would be paying him Arroyo/Harang beginning immediately and control him for 3 years at that cost. Think about it...3 years/$30M or 6 years/$30M (i think or is it 5 years)? They can bring Chapman up in late May. The 5th starter (who admittedly won't be great) will get what, maybe 6 starts? Owings/Maloney/Lehr...someone can do it. If the club is building for the future, then they need to wait on Chapman. As Mike said, 2010 isn't likely to be the year for the Reds anyway.

klw
03-10-2010, 09:49 AM
One thing to consider is that it is easier to limit Chapman's innings in the minors. Pulling him early in a game in AA is easier to hide than in front of 35k in Cincinnati. The Reds should start him in the minors to handle him similar to what the Red sox did a couple of seasons back with Buchholz. (could have been Lester) Started him on the farm for short outings, brought him up midseason, this allowed him to have full outings in the MLB without worrying about building his innings too quickly.

osuceltic
03-10-2010, 10:52 AM
One thing to consider is that it is easier to limit Chapman's innings in the minors. Pulling him early in a game in AA is easier to hide than in front of 35k in Cincinnati. The Reds should start him in the minors to handle him similar to what the Red sox did a couple of seasons back with Buchholz. (could have been Lester) Started him on the farm for short outings, brought him up midseason, this allowed him to have full outings in the MLB without worrying about building his innings too quickly.

Exactly. In the big-leagues, it's all about winning -- as it should be. If you're worried about development or pitch counts with a young guy, then send him down. If you keep him, you'd better be comfortable with him doing whatever he needs to do to help the team win -- 200 ip, 120 pitches in a start ... whatever.

No one ever said a guy was ruined because they brought him up too late.

TRF
03-10-2010, 11:10 AM
Exactly. In the big-leagues, it's all about winning -- as it should be. If you're worried about development or pitch counts with a young guy, then send him down. If you keep him, you'd better be comfortable with him doing whatever he needs to do to help the team win -- 200 ip, 120 pitches in a start ... whatever.

No one ever said a guy was ruined because they brought him up too late.

Roberto Petagine.

wasn't re ruined because he was brought up too late? :)

Sea Ray
03-10-2010, 04:02 PM
And thank goodness too. The Reds simply cannot afford to enter the Super 2 status situation with Chapman.

Actually if they break camp with him, he's no super two. He may very well legitimately get in three years and be arbitration eligible just like everyone else with three years service time

Homer Bailey
03-10-2010, 04:50 PM
Actually if they break camp with him, he's no super two. He may very well legitimately get in three years and be arbitration eligible just like everyone else with three years service time

My understanding is that it takes all players 3 years to become arbitration eligible, unless you are part of the 20% or so that accrue the most service time out of that class, in which case, if AC started with the club, he would almost certainly be Super 2. Am I using the correct rationale here?

IslandRed
03-10-2010, 07:56 PM
My understanding is that it takes all players 3 years to become arbitration eligible, unless you are part of the 20% or so that accrue the most service time out of that class, in which case, if AC started with the club, he would almost certainly be Super 2. Am I using the correct rationale here?

Not really. The super-twos are the top 17% of the class that has at least two years of service time, but not yet three years. If Chapman starts in Cincinnati and stays there, after 2011 he will have two years of service time, but only two; he'll be nowhere near the top 17%, those guys will be between 2.5 and 3. Then after 2012, he would have the full three years and would qualify on that basis.

The super-two thing would come into play if Chapman starts in the minors but is called up quickly, so at the end of 2012 he would have closer to three years than two. Then he'd probably end up a super-two.

RedsManRick
03-10-2010, 08:21 PM
One thing to consider is that it is easier to limit Chapman's innings in the minors. Pulling him early in a game in AA is easier to hide than in front of 35k in Cincinnati. The Reds should start him in the minors to handle him similar to what the Red sox did a couple of seasons back with Buchholz. (could have been Lester) Started him on the farm for short outings, brought him up midseason, this allowed him to have full outings in the MLB without worrying about building his innings too quickly.

This is also an argument for using him in the bullpen at the major league level to start with... I'd love to see the Reds handle him the way the Rays handled David Price.

MikeS21
03-10-2010, 09:22 PM
This is also an argument for using him in the bullpen at the major league level to start with... I'd love to see the Reds handle him the way the Rays handled David Price.
While I see some wisdom in this, I also see problems with bullpen duty, such as how often he pitches, number of times he warms up, etc. There is a mental difference between starting and relieving, it would seem Chapman would need the routine of preparing for starting.

klw mentioned this a few posts ago, and I agree:

One thing to consider is that it is easier to limit Chapman's innings in the minors. Pulling him early in a game in AA is easier to hide than in front of 35k in Cincinnati. The Reds should start him in the minors to handle him similar to what the Red sox did a couple of seasons back with Buchholz. (could have been Lester) Started him on the farm for short outings, brought him up midseason, this allowed him to have full outings in the MLB without worrying about building his innings too quickly.
Why not let him go to AA or AAA and put him on a strict innings/pitch count? I say 5 innings or 70 pitches, whichever comes first. At least he gets a regular routine established of regular starts, warming-up, throwing session between starts, etc.

RedsManRick
03-10-2010, 09:30 PM
Mike, I guess it comes down the value of those things you mention versus the value of facing major league caliber hitters, adjusting to major league life, and the production he might bring to the Reds in the heat of a playoff race (we hope...).

edabbs44
03-10-2010, 09:33 PM
This is also an argument for using him in the bullpen at the major league level to start with... I'd love to see the Reds handle him the way the Rays handled David Price.

Liriano used to be the gold standard on how to handle a young pitcher. One TJ surgery and meltdown later, and it is back to the drawing board.

It's becoming apparent that pitching health, at this time, is a crapshoot.

kaldaniels
03-10-2010, 10:16 PM
I've said this before and will keep saying it.

The only factor in the decision where to play Chapman is what is best for his development long term. Contract, roster space, team record, ticket sales all should be irrelevant to that one key question.

Contract is always relevant for the Reds. Period. Not complaining, just how it is.

dougdirt
03-10-2010, 10:44 PM
Liriano used to be the gold standard on how to handle a young pitcher. One TJ surgery and meltdown later, and it is back to the drawing board.

It's becoming apparent that pitching health, at this time, is a crapshoot.

Liriano also has/had terrible mechanics too.

REDblooded
03-10-2010, 11:41 PM
While I see some wisdom in this, I also see problems with bullpen duty, such as how often he pitches, number of times he warms up, etc. There is a mental difference between starting and relieving, it would seem Chapman would need the routine of preparing for starting.

klw mentioned this a few posts ago, and I agree:

Why not let him go to AA or AAA and put him on a strict innings/pitch count? I say 5 innings or 70 pitches, whichever comes first. At least he gets a regular routine established of regular starts, warming-up, throwing session between starts, etc.

Definitely agree with the wisdom in this... Wasn't there an article mentioning the fact that the Cuban pitching schedule is a bit different than that in MLB? I thought I may have read that they get the start every 6 games instead of 5...

OnBaseMachine
03-11-2010, 01:00 AM
Paul Daugherty article on Chapman:


As for Chapman himself, his coaches rave about his sweat ethic. They're impressed with how polished he seems as a pitcher. He's in a baseball cocoon, as close to a perfect learning environment as any player will see. Baseball is all Chapman has. Fossas also suspects that, to some extent, desperation is a great motivator. Chapman might have a lot of money. But he has nowhere to go.

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20100310/COL03/3110326/1007/SPT/Pitcher+oblivious+to+Chap-mania

redsmetz
03-11-2010, 06:02 AM
From Minorleagueball.com comes this bit in a piece on Chapman and Strasburg:

http://www.minorleagueball.com/2010/3/10/1366746/chapman-and-strasburg-what-is-to


So what should the Reds do with Chapman? If he continues to pitch like this, pressure to bring him north will increase. I can understand that. I don't know and can't predict what will happen roster-wise, but I can tell you what I would do if I were in Cincy's shoes. If he keeps blowing people away this spring, I would be publically non-committal about bringing him north until the last minute, then assign him to Double-A Carolina to begin the season. I would keep him there for a minimum of 10 starts, focusing on getting him acclimated to the United States, the language, and professional baseball. Even if he's blowing people away, the cultural transition can be a very difficult one for Cuban players. Psychologically, if he has a rough adjustment it could have a negative impact on what happens on the field. Therefore, I would be cautious until I was sure he is comfortable off-the-field as well as on.

After 10 starts, I would re-assess. If he's struggling or just mediocre, leave him there. If he's dominating the league, I'd move him up to Triple-A Louisville. At Louisville I'd re-assess after five starts. If he's shutting down Triple-A, then I'd promote him to the majors at that point. If he's struggling or mediocre, I'd leave him there until September. So, if I were in charge of Cincinnati's player development, Chapman would get a minimum of 15 starts in Double-A and Triple-A before being pushed into major league action.

MikeS21
03-11-2010, 06:59 AM
Another issue I wonder about is that Chapman learn to pace himself. When you are coming into the game in relief, the temptation is to let fly 100 mph fastballs for an inning. Whereas, with starting, he may need to learn to pace himself with 96-97 mph fastballs, knowing that he needs to save some gas for later in the game.

I, too, would like to see the Reds give Chapman 15-20 starts minimum at AA and AAA. I do not think the Reds will compete in 2010, even with Chapman in the rotation. I simply don't think the offense is there. So I would keep him in a low pressure environment, where the organization has a support system already in place for young, Latin American players who are getting their first taste of American life. Keep Chapman away from the media circus that's sure to follow him around when he hits the majors.

But, that's just my opinion. That, and fifty cents will get you a cup of coffee.:)

mth123
03-11-2010, 07:23 AM
Another issue I wonder about is that Chapman learn to pace himself. When you are coming into the game in relief, the temptation is to let fly 100 mph fastballs for an inning. Whereas, with starting, he may need to learn to pace himself with 96-97 mph fastballs, knowing that he needs to save some gas for later in the game.

I, too, would like to see the Reds give Chapman 15-20 starts minimum at AA and AAA. I do not think the Reds will compete in 2010, even with Chapman in the rotation. I simply don't think the offense is there. So I would keep him in a low pressure environment, where the organization has a support system already in place for young, Latin American players who are getting their first taste of American life. Keep Chapman away from the media circus that's sure to follow him around when he hits the majors.

But, that's just my opinion. That, and fifty cents will get you a cup of coffee.:)

Agree with most of this, but I though Coffee cost more than that these days.

Chapman to AAA while he continues to adjust, learns to start on 4 days rest and get into the routine, manage his inngs while the Reds take the time to get a look at Maloney or somebody else. Meanwhile, it helps avoid the issue with the contract. Too many big picture reasons suggest AAA to make it worth 10 or so starts in April and May.

The kid is still just 21 and while he may be more grown up than a middle class kid from the US, a little growing up outside the spotlight won't hurt him.

edabbs44
03-11-2010, 08:12 AM
Liriano also has/had terrible mechanics too.

It seems like that is the rub...if the guy breaks down, look at the usage. If we can't blame the usage, let's blame the mechanics.

dougdirt
03-11-2010, 02:25 PM
It seems like that is the rub...if the guy breaks down, look at the usage. If we can't blame the usage, let's blame the mechanics.

Or, he literally had poor mechanics. Look at the hyper abduction he gets when he threw pre injury (when he "loads" his pitching elbow gets higher than his shoulder, a lot.... that isn't good). He no longer does this as the Twins have changed his mechanics post injury.

OnBaseMachine
03-11-2010, 03:58 PM
From Jason Grey of ESPN:

Not joking: a veteran scout told me today he actually considered using the phrase "Cooperstown-worthy" on his Chapman report

http://twitter.com/Jason_Grey

RedsManRick
03-11-2010, 04:02 PM
From Jason Grey of ESPN:

Not joking: a veteran scout told me today he actually considered using the phrase "Cooperstown-worthy" on his Chapman report

http://twitter.com/Jason_Grey

Wow. Maybe I'm just paranoid, but it seems the hype machine is starting to get a little bit of out control...

membengal
03-11-2010, 04:19 PM
Frankly, it beats the hades out of a series of reports that the Reds spent $30 million dollars on the second coming of Jimmy Anderson...

membengal
03-11-2010, 04:24 PM
I peeked ahead at tomorrow, and the Reds/Dodgers game is going to be available on mlb.com/audio with mlb.com announcers. Looks like it may be available on MLB TV as well for those that can access that. Might be worth a spin around the DirecTV dials tonite looking for a channel called PRIM on the mlb tv guide.

REDblooded
03-11-2010, 05:10 PM
When is Chapman supposed to pitch tomorrow? Any idea on the tentative rotation?

OnBaseMachine
03-11-2010, 05:16 PM
When is Chapman supposed to pitch tomorrow? Any idea on the tentative rotation?

* Tomorrow's pitchers: Bronson Arroyo, Micah Owings, Aroldis Chapman, Carlos Fisher and Francisco Cordero.

Chapman is scheduled to throw on March 17, too, when the Reds have a day-night doubleheader

http://cnati.com/blogs/ctrent/2010/03/thinking-out-loud-31110.php

REDblooded
03-11-2010, 05:39 PM
Appreciate it... I have a buddy that's an amazing professional sports photographer and he's gonna try to get some sweet pics tomorrow... Has an assignment to get some Griffey pics first though, but those parks are only 15 minutes apart...

To give you an idea on some of his work...

http://markjrebilas.com/blog/?p=3406

http://markjrebilas.com/blog/?p=7461

RedEye
03-11-2010, 11:19 PM
From Jason Grey of ESPN:

Not joking: a veteran scout told me today he actually considered using the phrase "Cooperstown-worthy" on his Chapman report

http://twitter.com/Jason_Grey

Heck, maybe he should just retire right now!

Will M
03-12-2010, 02:38 AM
i was trying to think of the last time i thought that the Reds had a truly dominant young star. not just a good or very good player but the kind of guy mentioned with the best in baseball. it was Eric Davis (before the injuries started affecting him)

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 02:41 AM
i was trying to think of the last time i thought that the Reds had a truly dominant young star. not just a good or very good player but the kind of guy mentioned with the best in baseball. it was Eric Davis (before the injuries started affecting him)

How about Barry Larkin? Multiple Gold Gloves, an MVP award, numerous All-Star appearances. Probably not the best player in the game but top 5-10.

I think Jay Bruce has a chance to be that type of player.

Ron Madden
03-12-2010, 03:29 AM
How about Barry Larkin? Multiple Gold Gloves, an MVP award, numerous All-Star appearances. Probably not the best player in the game but top 5-10.

I think Jay Bruce has a chance to be that type of player.

Barry Larkin seemed to fly under the radar without much media hype.

The media named Eric Davis "The Next Willy Mays" they proclaimed Ken Griffey Jr, would lead the Reds to multiple World Championships.

When Davis and Griffey Jr. failed to live up to those expectations (for what ever reasons) the local media and Fans turned on them.

I honestly believe too much media hype can do more harm than good to most of these Kids.

kpresidente
03-12-2010, 06:13 AM
I thought Jose Rijo was the 2nd-best pitcher in the NL (after Maddux) for a few years.

membengal
03-12-2010, 06:53 AM
To reiterate, DirecTV folks with the sports channel package should check channel 694 for the game at 3:00 est.

BCubb2003
03-12-2010, 08:42 AM
i was trying to think of the last time i thought that the Reds had a truly dominant young star. not just a good or very good player but the kind of guy mentioned with the best in baseball. it was Eric Davis (before the injuries started affecting him)

"To Johnny Bench -- a sure Hall of Famer" -- Ted Williams

redsmetz
03-12-2010, 08:53 AM
"To Johnny Bench -- a sure Hall of Famer" -- Ted Williams

It's funny you posted this because the question sent me off looking through Google's News Archives and found this piece from 1968:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=jR0MAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0FwDAAAAIBAJ&pg=4692,2035139&dq=johnny+bench&hl=en

I also found an article from the Montreal Gazette from when Frank Robinson was traded and another about Robinson and Mantle being up for post season awards in 1956. Fascinating stuff, but I need to drag myself out of that and get to work!

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 04:53 PM
Dusty Baker on Chapman (from Fay):


“The main this is we’re trying to let him be himself. I’ve talked to him about some things, family, Cuban baseball, religion. But we got him to pitch. We’ve got to keep on the rotation and see how he does. See how he is. We don’t really know what we have. Everyone is getting ahead of themselves.”

follow the link for the rest:
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/12/baker-on-chapman-2/

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 05:11 PM
Another impressive outing today by Chapman. His line was: 2 IP, 2 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 2 K. Both hits were infield singles. For those who didn't see it, here's how it went batter by batter.

First inning of work:

Jason Repko - Weak popout to Alonso in foul territory
Ivan De Jesus - Infield single to Miles at 2B
Rafael Furcal - infield single to 3B, could have been ruled an error
Pickoff at first base by Ramon Hernandez
Weak lineout to 1B as Ausmus just threw the bat at the ball.

Second inning of work:

Andre Ethier - weak popout to Castillo in foul ground at 3B
Matt Kemp - struckout swinging on a slider
Casey Blake - struckout looking on a changeup on the outside corner

After his outing on Monday, Chapman said he normally starts off slow in the first inning and gets stronger as the game goes on. That's what happened today. He didn't have his best command of his secondary pitches in the first inning but everything was crisp in the second inning. Almost everything he threw in the second inning was right around the plate. He's very impressive. Easy, easy gas.

Also forgot to add that he threw a wicked unhittable slider to Casey Blake on 1-1.

membengal
03-12-2010, 05:16 PM
The strikeout of Blake apparently came on an 83 mph change. Which doesn't seem entirely fair.

The K of Kemp was on a 90 mph slider.

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 05:18 PM
A tweet from John Fay:

Struck out Kemp on 90 slider. Sequence: 100, 85, 99, 87, 83, 97, 90.

http://twitter.com/johnfayman

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 06:02 PM
Fay has a new blog post up on Chapman's outing today:


Chapman threw all change-ups and fastballs late in the outing because the slider wasn’t working.

“I wasn’t finishing up with my (slider),” he said. “I was not happy.”

Hernandez said there was a reason for that.

“It was very dry today,” he said. “That made the ball slippery. He couldn’t get a grip on it.”

Chapman also has been dealing with a bit of cold. It didn’t seem to affect him much.


follow the link for more:
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/12/the-chapman-report/

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 06:55 PM
Hal McCoy article on Chapman:


Former Reds general manager Jim Bowden, now a radio broadcaster, watched Chapman and said, “That fastball? Unbelievable. I was glad to see him work on breaking stuff and off-speed stuff in the second inning.

“As you know, major-league hitters will hit a 98 miles an hour fastball if you don’t have command of other pitches, but I will say you can’t see the ball come out of his hand. Very deceptive.”

Then Bowden added, “This is going to be a good team, best I’ve seen in Cincinnati since 1999. They’re going to win a lot of games.”

read the rest here:
http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/landing/?blockID=196502&feedID=5264

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 06:57 PM
For those who couldn't watch the game on TV, here's video of Chapman recording all six outs:

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/media/video.jsp?content_id=7190897

Screwball
03-12-2010, 07:02 PM
Hal McCoy article on Chapman:

read the rest here:
http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/landing/?blockID=196502&feedID=5264

Not really Chapman related, but I liked Jiim Bowden's quote at the end:


“This is going to be a good team, best I’ve seen in Cincinnati since 1999. They’re going to win a lot of games.”


:thumbup:

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 07:29 PM
C. Trent - Chapmania continues to grow...


My plan is to make the big league team, but if it doesn't work out, I'll go to the minors and work hard to get back up here," Chapman said.

Even that kind of talk is premature, Baker said. There's so much to be seen. The Reds hope to pitch him again next week either against the Brewers or Indians in Goodyear and throughout the spring.


http://cnati.com/spring-training-2010/chapmania-continues-to-grow-001498/

Hal McCoy - Why is somebody from Cuba named Chapman?


OK, QUICK question. How can a Cuban be named Chapman?

“My ancestors are from Jamaica and moved to Cuba,” said Chapman. OK, mon, so who in Jamaica is named Chapman. I digress.


http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/entries/2010/03/12/phoenix_ariz_every_time.html?cxtype=feedbot

REDblooded
03-12-2010, 08:21 PM
http://uspresswire.com/sets/83498

Awesome photo set that my buddy picked up at todays game...

redsmetz
03-12-2010, 08:43 PM
C. Trent - Chapmania continues to grow...



http://cnati.com/spring-training-2010/chapmania-continues-to-grow-001498/

Hal McCoy - Why is somebody from Cuba named Chapman?



http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/entries/2010/03/12/phoenix_ariz_every_time.html?cxtype=feedbot

Um, Hal, bless you, but Jamaica was a British Colony for eons, hence the English name Chapman. Of course, we have our most famous Chapman known throughout Reds Country, a former seed slinger too, John Chapman, aka Johnny Appleseed. Heck, that works in lots of ways, isn't a baseball sometimes called an "apple"?

Spring~Fields
03-12-2010, 09:32 PM
Hal McCoy article on Chapman:



read the rest here:
http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/landing/?blockID=196502&feedID=5264


“Possibly everybody is getting ahead of themselves with this kid,” Baker added.

With what Chapman has done so far, mainly spin the dials on radar guns, Baker was asked if he understands the super-hype and the massive attention.

“Yeah, I understand it,” Baker said. “But I don’t have to adhere to it. First, we want him to fit in with the guys. We got him to pitch and let’s let him pitch right now.”



“Aroldis is the youngest and most inexperienced to come out of Cuba,” Baker said. “All the others were 24 or older and this guy is very young (22) and experience-wise even younger than that because he didn’t start pitching until he was 16.”


“It’s hard to plan an unknown entity,” said Baker. “Things may arise


Baker said the fact the Reds are well-populated with Latin players helps immensely and when somebody wondered how much help Chapman would get in the minors, Baker said, “We have Latin dudes all over the place to keep things in perspective and help him through it.”

Hmm !! (insert Baker, red flag icon here) Oh, nothing, just thinking to myself that I have seen this type of verbiage and dialogue coming from a certain personality before.

Even with all that, that was expressed or pointed out above, Chapman might actually be his number 1 with Arroyo and Harang being what they have been the last couple seasons, and Volquez still recovering.

I do agree with Baker on watering down the mania type behavior to keep Chapman focused and the pressures and distractions away from him as much as possible, if it can be done.

westofyou
03-12-2010, 09:57 PM
Um, Hal, bless you, but Jamaica was a British Colony for eons, hence the English name Chapman. Of course, we have our most famous Chapman known throughout Reds Country, a former seed slinger too, John Chapman, aka Johnny Appleseed. Heck, that works in lots of ways, isn't a baseball sometimes called an "apple"?

I have to side with Hal here, Cuba is a Spanish colony for sure, the prior guys born in Cuba who played MLB are very latin in the surname world.




CAREER
BIRTHPLACE: CUBA

AT BATS AB
1 Rafael Palmeiro 10472
2 Tony Perez 9778
3 Bert Campaneris 8684
4 Tony Taylor 7680
5 Jose Canseco 7057
6 Jose Cardenal 6964
7 Leo Cardenas 6707
8 Minnie Minoso 6579
9 Cookie Rojas 6309
10 Tony Oliva 6301
11 Tito Fuentes 5566
12 Tony Gonzalez 5195
13 Zoilo Versalles 5141
14 Rey Ordonez 3115
15 Mike Gonzalez 2829
16 Joe Azcue 2828
17 Paul Casanova 2786
18 Chico Fernandez 2778
19 Yuniesky Betancourt 2334
20 Armando Marsans 2273
21 Bobby Estalella 2196
22 Willie Miranda 1914
23 Eli Marrero 1906
24 Jose Tartabull 1857
25 Roman Mejias 1768
26 Mike Guerra 1581
27 Alex Sanchez 1527
28 Jackie Hernandez 1480
29 Yunel Escobar 1361
30 Sandy Amoros 1311
31 Gil Torres 1271
32 Chico Ruiz 1150
33 Mike de la Hoz 1114
34 Dolf Luque 1043
35 Alexei Ramirez 1022
36 Pancho Herrera 975
37 Julio Becquer 974
38 Jose Valdivielso 971
39 Camilo Pascual 967
40 Marty Martinez 945
41 Kendry Morales 943
42 Nap Reyes 931
43 Nelson Santovenia 884
44 Livan Hernandez 862
T45 Orestes Destrade 765
T45 Sandy Valdespino 765
47 Pedro Ramos 703
48 Mike Cuellar 661
49 Roberto Ortiz 659
50 Barbaro Garbey 626
51 Jose Arcia 615
52 Luis Tiant 513
53 Carlos Paula 457
54 Merito Acosta 435
55 Leo Posada 426
56 Hector Rodriguez 407
57 Diego Segui 384
58 Manuel Cueto 379
59 Mike Fornieles 308
T60 Brayan Pena 292
T60 Orlando McFarlane 292
62 Rafael Almeida 285
63 Mike Herrera 276
64 Rene Monteagudo 270
65 Orlando Pena 264
66 Chico Hernandez 244
67 Ray Noble 243
68 Connie Marrero 236
69 Bobby Ramos 232
70 Sandy Consuegra 218
71 Ossie Alvarez 198
72 Jose Martinez 188
73 Marcelino Lopez 181
74 Tony Martinez 175
75 Orlando Gonzalez 164
76 Frank Campos 147
77 Jose Rodriguez 145
78 Juan Delis 132
79 Jose Zardon 131
80 Michel Hernandez 118
81 Orlando Hernandez 116
82 Osvaldo Fernandez 115
83 Julio Moreno 106
84 Leo Sutherland 101
85 Angel Aragon 79
86 Rene Arocha 69
87 Ozzie Canseco 65
T88 Vladimir Nunez 60
T88 Jose Acosta 60
90 Tommy de la Cruz 58
91 Jack Calvo 56
92 Michael Tejera 52
93 Oscar Tuero 51
T94 Emilio Palmero 48
T94 Luis Aloma 48
96 Minnie Rojas 41
T97 Rolando Arrojo 37
T97 Rogelio Alvarez 37
T97 Ricardo Torres 37
100 George Lauzerique 33
101 Jose Contreras 29
102 Oscar Zamora 28
T103 Jorge Toca 27
T103 Lino Donoso 27
T105 Danny Morejon 26
T105 Hank Izquierdo 26
T105 Adrian Zabala 26
108 Sandy Ullrich 25
109 Reggie Otero 23
110 Barbaro Canizares 21
111 Juan Miranda 19
112 Chico Fernandez 18
T113 Evelio Hernandez 17
T113 Ed Bauta 17
115 Minnie Mendoza 16
116 Hector Martinez 15
117 Raul Sanchez 14
118 Angel Fleitas 13
T119 Pedro Dibut 11
T119 Alay Soler 11
121 Aurelio Monteagudo 10
122 Izzy Leon 9
T123 Preston Gomez 7
T123 Yoslan Herrera 7
T123 Cholly Naranjo 7
T123 Juan Diaz 7
T127 Baby Ortiz 6
T127 Vincente Amor 6
T129 Bert Cueto 5
T129 Julio Gonzales 5
T129 Bill Ortega 5
T129 Eusebio Gonzalez 5
T133 Danys Baez 4
T133 Rudy Arias 4
T133 Adrian Hernandez 4
T133 Tony Ordenana 4
T133 Carlos Pascual 4
T138 Rene Valdez 3
T138 Jorge Comellas 3
T140 Luis Suarez 2
T140 Ariel Prieto 2
T140 Hansel Izquierdo 2
T143 Tony Menendez 1
T143 Hector Maestri 1
T143 Roy Valdes 1
T143 Tony Fossas 1
T143 Ramon Garcia 1
T143 Freddy Rodriguez 1
T143 Armando Roche 1

redsmetz
03-12-2010, 10:21 PM
I have to side with Hal here, Cuba is a Spanish colony for sure, the prior guys born in Cuba who played MLB are very latin in the surname world.

The quote I put up left off part of McCoy's response: “My ancestors are from Jamaica and moved to Cuba,” said Chapman. OK, mon, so who in Jamaica is named Chapman. I digress. .

It sounded like McCoy was questioning why anyone in Jamaica would be named Chapman, hence my comment about it having been a British colony. The other primary Latin player without an Anglo name was David Green from Nicaragua. I think there were places in Nicaragua where folks moved over from Belize (formerly British Honduras), which would explain his name too.

_Sir_Charles_
03-12-2010, 10:31 PM
I have to side with Hal here, Cuba is a Spanish colony for sure, the prior guys born in Cuba who played MLB are very latin in the surname world.
]

Jamaica ancestry...not Cuban. If his ansectors were of Cuban decent, then yes he'd have a spanish name. But jamaica is England...not Spain. I understand the confusion on Hal's part, but once you realize the England connection, it's pretty clear.

~edit~ Sorry Redsmetz, just saw you already responded and cleared it up. Nevermind. :O)

OnBaseMachine
03-12-2010, 10:38 PM
A few days ago the Tampa Bay Rays signed a Cuban player by the name of Leslie Anderson. Again, not exactly a surname you would expect for a Cuban.

RedsManRick
03-12-2010, 10:48 PM
I'm optimistic that Reds management seems committed to letting him go at his own pace. Short of throwing no-hitters every time out, I don't think there's really a chance he starts with the big clubs. He's going to get some time in the minors to adjust culturally. But it sure is excited to see how much more coachable and polished he is than the original rumors suggested.

redsmetz
03-12-2010, 10:50 PM
Jamaica ancestry...not Cuban. If his ansectors were of Cuban decent, then yes he'd have a spanish name. But jamaica is England...not Spain. I understand the confusion on Hal's part, but once you realize the England connection, it's pretty clear.

~edit~ Sorry Redsmetz, just saw you already responded and cleared it up. Nevermind. :O)

And my thing was meant to be a bit tongue in cheek. I can't dismiss that McCoy was just being silly. Given his sense of humor, that might be the case.

VR
03-13-2010, 02:31 AM
Aroldis spelled backwards is Sidlora

redsmetz
03-13-2010, 07:59 AM
A piece from today's Washington Post about Chapman juxtaposed with Strasburg

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/11/AR2010031102516.html

Big Klu
03-13-2010, 09:42 AM
The quote I put up left off part of McCoy's response: “My ancestors are from Jamaica and moved to Cuba,” said Chapman. OK, mon, so who in Jamaica is named Chapman. I digress. .

It sounded like McCoy was questioning why anyone in Jamaica would be named Chapman, hence my comment about it having been a British colony. The other primary Latin player without an Anglo name was David Green from Nicaragua. I think there were places in Nicaragua where folks moved over from Belize (formerly British Honduras), which would explain his name too.

Blue Jays slugger George Bell was from the Dominican Republic.

traderumor
03-13-2010, 10:08 AM
I would imagine the big market fans are now questioning the well that was poisoned when it became apparent that Chapman was not as enamored with the big boys as the foreign free agents normally are.

The Reds seem to have finally been in the right place at the right time on this one. Chapman's agent seems to be a good one, investing in his client's long-term possibility of success instead of just going for the money grab from day one.

There is certainly enough history of setting up these young men to fail by sending them to the toughest fan and media markets right off the bat that his agent looked for something outside of the big market pressure cookers, even if it sacrificed a few current dollars.

lollipopcurve
03-13-2010, 10:18 AM
The Reds seem to have finally been in the right place at the right time on this one.

No luck was involved, the way I see it. They sold their opportunity better than several other teams did.

BCubb2003
03-13-2010, 11:22 AM
Blue Jays slugger George Bell was from the Dominican Republic.

As was some guy named Vladimir. And there's a Canadian with an Italian name. And Homer is a pitcher.

Chip R
03-13-2010, 11:48 AM
A few days ago the Tampa Bay Rays signed a Cuban player by the name of Leslie Anderson. Again, not exactly a surname you would expect for a Cuban.

Nor a first name.

OnBaseMachine
03-14-2010, 12:10 AM
Nice article by Phil Rogers.


So who’s better: Chapman or Strasburg?

That’s the great baseball argument of the moment, one that turned white hot after the two newcomers combined for this pitching line in their spring debuts: 4 IP, 3 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 1 BB, 5 SO. There’s no right or wrong answer. The amazing thing is there can be a discussion


Follow the link for the rest:
http://news.bostonherald.com/sports/baseball/other_mlb/view/20100313renaissance_era_for_pitching_phenoms_such_ as_stephen_strasburg_and_aroldis_chapman/srvc=home&position=recent

Matt700wlw
03-14-2010, 01:54 AM
Bob Feller's an idiot.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1166971/index.htm

RBA
03-14-2010, 03:37 AM
Bob Feller's an idiot.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1166971/index.htm

The joke went over my head.

Big Klu
03-14-2010, 01:36 PM
Bob Feller is a bitter old man who resents the fact that players today (and for the last 40 years) made more money than he did. I think he also resents the fact that he lost time to World War II. While I greatly respect the sacrifice he made in the war, he needs to come to grips with the fact that he wasn't alone in losing productive years to WWII, and in fact he should be grateful that came back at all--let alone in one piece! Thousands of American boys gave their lives at Monte Cassino, Anzio, Normandy, Bastogne, the Ardennes, Pearl Harbor, the Philippines, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and other places. But Feller always seems to have this attitude that the world owes him something.

traderumor
03-14-2010, 04:29 PM
No luck was involved, the way I see it. They sold their opportunity better than several other teams did.They only had the opportunity to sell because they weren't necessarily looking for the largest bidder. That is a relatively new development in the foreign free agent market.

bucksfan2
03-14-2010, 07:42 PM
I'm optimistic that Reds management seems committed to letting him go at his own pace. Short of throwing no-hitters every time out, I don't think there's really a chance he starts with the big clubs. He's going to get some time in the minors to adjust culturally. But it sure is excited to see how much more coachable and polished he is than the original rumors suggested.

I had thought that there is no way possible Chapman starts with the Reds. With each outing, and everything that I read, it looks like he has a shot to start with the big league club.

But I also realize that its spring training and ST starts should be taken with a grain of salt. I am not worried about Harrang as of right now so I really shouldn't be so excited about Chapman. With the advant of ESPN and Chapman's status his success is being over hyped and his bad outings will be over hyped as well.

OnBaseMachine
03-15-2010, 10:56 PM
From Hal McCoy:


THE DYNAMICS of watching the development and learning process of lefthanded Cuban defector Aroldis Chapman are enlightening.

On an early morning, with the dew still kissing the grass, Chapman was standing on a bullpen mound in deep discussion with pitching coach Brian Price, catcher Corky Miller and interpreter Tony Fossas.

Chapman spoke rapidly in the Spanish and Fossas said, “He says so far he has thrown fastballs on the first pitch to every hitter he has faced. He’d like permission to shake off the catcher because he’d like to throw some first-pitch sliders.”

for the complete article:
http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/landing_reds?Young-guns-shine-in-13-5-trouncing-of-At=1&blockID=198053&feedID=4017

lollipopcurve
03-16-2010, 09:49 AM
They only had the opportunity to sell because they weren't necessarily looking for the largest bidder. That is a relatively new development in the foreign free agent market.

Agreed. It is an interesting and welcome development. But I still object to classifying the signing as "right place, right time." Chapman hardly fell into their lap. The FO and ownership deserve a ton of credit for the signing.

Spring~Fields
03-16-2010, 11:40 AM
I was all happy and optimistic about Chapman, Leake and Wood but, everyone keeps telling me in their post that spring training and spring training stats are meaningless, so now what do I do if what these guys are doing in spring training is meaningless? I guess I just have to toss out all the positives because spring training and spring training stats are meaningless. :doh:

Or does meaningless spring training results just count for some and not other’s, I am all confused. :confused:

Sea Ray
03-16-2010, 11:50 AM
I was all happy and optimistic about Chapman, Leake and Wood but, everyone keeps telling me in their post that spring training and spring training stats are meaningless, so now what do I do if what these guys are doing in spring training is meaningless? I guess I just have to toss out all the positives because spring training and spring training stats are meaningless. :doh:

Or does meaningless spring training results just count for some and not other’s, I am all confused. :confused:

In the grand scheme of things it is meaningless but that's not to say you can't feel good about it. Pete Rose bowling over Ray Fosse in the 1970 All Star game was meaningless but it was sure fun to see.

I like seeing Reds players do well in Spring Training because I think it bodes well for the future but I realize anything can happen. If nothing else, it helps build confidence and may increase a player's value in future trades

membengal
03-16-2010, 03:55 PM
For what it's worth, and to pass the time, a former MLB scout named Bernie Pleskoff has been writing observations articles for rotowire this spring from his attending games out in Arizona. He saw the Reds last week, and had this to say about A. Chapman among other observations:

http://www.rotowire.com/baseball/features/spring_notebook.htm


I have been fortunate in my lifetime to have seen Sandy Koufax, Sam McDowell, and Herb Score in their early years and in their prime. I have to swallow hard and write this - Aroldis Chapman is further advanced at this stage of his career than the three dominant lefties named above. He is beyond good. Here's what I saw. The ball just kind of floats out of his huge hands (very large fingers) with no effort. He hit 100 MPH on his FB with no effort. He barely broke a sweat. His release is clean and crisp. His slider and change-up are THAT GOOD. He is slow to home plate from the stretch, but it won't matter because he won't be out of the stretch that much. He has long, loping strides because of his 6'4" frame. If he continues to challenge hitters and keeps the ball down, he will be a Hall Of Fame pitcher, period. The Reds simply have to start him in a warm climate minor league city and let him get used to pitching in America. That shouldn't take long. By the way, left-handed hitters have um, let me see here ... NO CHANCE!

membengal
03-16-2010, 04:23 PM
And, while I generally agree these kind of comps seem over-the-top, I sure do appreciate the early tenor of coverage being these kinds of comparisons as opposed to scouts saying that he has the control of Steve Dalkowski...

OnBaseMachine
03-16-2010, 06:58 PM
Mark Sheldon article on Chapman...


"I feel all the stress I had in the past has gone away," said Chapman, who defected from Cuba during a July tournament in the Netherlands. "I feel really good about myself and I feel good being here."

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100316&content_id=8809578&vkey=news_cin&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

membengal
03-16-2010, 07:21 PM
Chapman starting the 4:00 est game tomorrow against the Brewers. Too bad, as the 10:00 est game is on TV against Cleveland, but for any with MLB audio, they can hear the 4:00 est game.

VR
03-16-2010, 07:37 PM
Bob Feller is a bitter old man who resents the fact that players today (and for the last 40 years) made more money than he did. I think he also resents the fact that he lost time to World War II. While I greatly respect the sacrifice he made in the war, he needs to come to grips with the fact that he wasn't alone in losing productive years to WWII, and in fact he should be grateful that came back at all--let alone in one piece! Thousands of American boys gave their lives at Monte Cassino, Anzio, Normandy, Bastogne, the Ardennes, Pearl Harbor, the Philippines, Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and other places. But Feller always seems to have this attitude that the world owes him something.

I'm sure Bob was OK making what he did....compared to what the players did in 1880.

I think he was having a GET OFF MY LAWN moment.

dougdirt
03-16-2010, 07:45 PM
I was all happy and optimistic about Chapman, Leake and Wood but, everyone keeps telling me in their post that spring training and spring training stats are meaningless, so now what do I do if what these guys are doing in spring training is meaningless? I guess I just have to toss out all the positives because spring training and spring training stats are meaningless. :doh:

Or does meaningless spring training results just count for some and not other’s, I am all confused. :confused:

Spring training stats means very little. Showing skillsets during spring training does indeed mean something.

reds44
03-16-2010, 07:47 PM
With all of the young, power arms showing promise it's going to suck when Maloney or Lincoln end up as the 5th starter.

RedsManRick
03-16-2010, 08:02 PM
With all of the young, power arms showing promise it's going to suck when Maloney or Lincoln end up as the 5th starter.

Maloney having success at the major league level would be a great thing for the Reds. It makes him a much more valuable trade asset.

As for Lincoln, I could see somebody chasing down a reliever offering a PTBNL for a fully-paid Lincoln. If I'm the Reds, I'd gladly take it.

Spring~Fields
03-16-2010, 10:10 PM
Spring training stats means very little. Showing skillsets during spring training does indeed mean something.

Makes good sense.

I am just high on the young pitchers looking forward. I think we as fans and the Reds really need them to do well as they progress into the future. I don't really expect them to be in the majors right away, but, I think we have something special in them to look forward to.

I can readily see why the hitting stats don't mean a lot. They are really bloated on the small samples especially the OBP, SLG and OPS. Not sustainable, and the other vets that are low right now will come up.

Jay Bruce is doing really well though, that's encouraging. :thumbup:

Cedric
03-16-2010, 10:19 PM
Skill sets still only show me a little. How is Chapman going to react when he walks a hitter that is right before Pujols? Does he have the mental aptitude at this point to work around that kind of mistake and not get flustered?

I'm also hoping that Cueto can handle that kind of thing better this year. It's no mystery that the biggest fault in his game right now is the mental side of pitching. It's fine and dandy to get all excited about Chapman, I am surely excited. But what happens when he gets into pressure and fails? Is he ready to handle what Cincinnati is known to do to young players?

_Sir_Charles_
03-16-2010, 11:11 PM
The only time I think spring training stats (or better termed spring training performance because you can actually play very well but not have the ball fall in for you) matter are in the instances where several players are competing for one spot. Like the 5th starters spot for instance. When several players all have viable shots at it...it'll come down to who performs better, or who accomplishes what the coaches want the most effectively. Stats are misleading, especially during spring training because you simply don't know what the coaches are wanting guys to work on or improve on.

So meaningless?...not completely. Heavily over-rated?....definitely.

OnBaseMachine
03-17-2010, 01:27 PM
From Fay:

FOSSAS STAYING: Baker said Tony Fossas will stay with the big league club to help acclimate Aroldis Chapman at least through the off day on Tuesday.

“Then Tony has to go back his club (Dayton),” Baker said. “That will give Chapman time without Tony.”

http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/17/real-split-squad/

membengal
03-17-2010, 01:34 PM
Hmmmm. Doesn't sound like they are planning on sending Chapman out anytime soon then. Very interesting. Big start today then.

Caveat Emperor
03-17-2010, 01:37 PM
Hmmmm. Doesn't sound like they are planning on sending Chapman out anytime soon then. Very interesting. Big start today then.

I don't know you can read much into it other than that Fossas has his day job to go do (being the pitching coach @ Dayton) and the Reds are unwilling/unable (or not interested in trying) to relieve him of those duties to stay with Chapman 24/7.

membengal
03-17-2010, 01:40 PM
CE, because the quote contained "that will give Chapman time without Tony" which indicates to me that they plan on keeping Chapman around camp into next week beyond Tuesday (the point at which Fossas will deal with Dayton). Which does, at that point, put him the mix to perhaps come north.

Not trying to read more into it than that.

bucksfan2
03-17-2010, 01:52 PM
CE, because the quote contained "that will give Chapman time without Tony" which indicates to me that they plan on keeping Chapman around camp into next week beyond Tuesday (the point at which Fossas will deal with Dayton). Which does, at that point, put him the mix to perhaps come north.

Not trying to read more into it than that.

I would agree but Chapman isn't going to start the season in Dayton. I think as of now the options are AA, AAA, or MLB. Anyway you look at it Chapman will have to learn to pitch without Tony around.

dougdirt
03-17-2010, 01:58 PM
CE, because the quote contained "that will give Chapman time without Tony" which indicates to me that they plan on keeping Chapman around camp into next week beyond Tuesday (the point at which Fossas will deal with Dayton). Which does, at that point, put him the mix to perhaps come north.

Not trying to read more into it than that.
I think it more just says that Chapman won't be practicing with the Low A team. Nothing more, nothing less.

membengal
03-17-2010, 02:00 PM
I think it means he will be in big league camp past Tuesday. Nothing more, nothing less. And, if so, he remains in the mix to make the team.

He could be sent to minor league camp and not work with Fossas too...

OnBaseMachine
03-17-2010, 04:59 PM
Aroldis Chapman, what more can you say other than wow.

His line today against a Brewers lineup that featured Rickie Weeks, Carlos Gomez, Ryan Braun, Corey Hart, and Alcides Escobar:

3 IP, 1 H, 1 R, 1 BB, 5 K

He allowed a leadoff solo HR to Weeks and then retired nine of the final 10 batters he faced, five via the strikeout. Apparently he hit 100 mph once today and had a nasty slider.

That brings his spring stats to: 7 IP, 4 H, 1 R, 2 BB/10 K

Homer Bailey
03-17-2010, 05:11 PM
That brings his spring stats to: 7 IP, 4 H, 1 R, 2 BB/10 K

Cueto's first career start: 7 IP, 1 R, 10K.

Found that kinda funny. Don't know why.

TRF
03-17-2010, 05:34 PM
Cueto's first career start: 7 IP, 1 R, 10K.

Found that kinda funny. Don't know why.

the one run? a HR.

reds44
03-17-2010, 05:41 PM
Wasn't the Upton homer the only baserunner Cueto gave up? I remember following that game on my phone during my senior year of high school and being giddy. Never seen anything like that before.

steig
03-17-2010, 06:38 PM
If camp broke today I don't see how Chapman is not on the roster. The way he has pitched and electrified the fan base should force the Reds to put him on the roster today. I don't see any other pitcher taking the 5th spot away from him convincingly. The Reds seem very dedicated to sending Leake and Wood to AAA. Maloney has done well but certainly not better than Chapman. Chapman has put the ball in the zone and hasn't walked a lot of batters. Lincoln has done nothing to show he is capable of being a good starter.

membengal
03-17-2010, 08:26 PM
Per C. Trent twitter:


Doug Davis on Chapman: 'He's going to be one of the greats if he stays healthy." Hart: "nothing was straight, everything moved"

Sea Ray
03-17-2010, 09:18 PM
Aroldis Chapman, what more can you say other than wow.



I'll tell what I say...I say send him out on the next train. He gave up a homer! We have high standards and we ain't toleratin' any guy who gives up HRs.

BCubb2003
03-17-2010, 09:30 PM
I'll tell what I say...I say send him out on the next train. He gave up a homer! We have high standards and we ain't toleratin' any guy who gives up HRs.

Those are rally killers. Chapman has all the weapons.

LoganBuck
03-17-2010, 10:02 PM
I'll tell what I say...I say send him out on the next train. He gave up a homer! We have high standards and we ain't toleratin' any guy who gives up HRs.

Mike Leake agrees.

Plus Plus
03-17-2010, 10:02 PM
RT @jskiddjr @johnfay I know you've probably been asked a billion times but what are the odds chapman starts the season as #5? 70-30 for.

http://twitter.com/johnfayman

klw
03-17-2010, 10:33 PM
Chapman premiered a sinker/ 2 seamer today
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/17/lincoln-to-the-bullpen-new-pitch-for-chapman/


Chapman showed the Reds another wrinkle Wednesday.

“He looked outstanding,” Baker said. ’He had a nasty sinker, a two-seamer we didn’t even know he had. He’s slowly but slowly adding to his repertoire of pitches. He’s feeling more confident.”

Spring~Fields
03-17-2010, 10:57 PM
I'll tell what I say...I say send him out on the next train. He gave up a homer! We have high standards and we ain't toleratin' any guy who gives up HRs.

:)

OK, but, Wells is going to have to be sent to the Siberian Winter Leauges, barefoot.

OnBaseMachine
03-17-2010, 11:42 PM
C. Trent article on Chapman:


"I fixed some of the mechanical problems I had and my control is not a problem at this moment," Chapman said through interpreter Tony Fossas. "Staying taller and finishing up my pitches better and not dropping my elbow. I was opening up too much and I've made those corrections."

Just as curious as the hitters are about Chapman, he's still learning the hitters he's facing.


full article:
http://cnati.com/spring-training-2010/-goodyear-ariz---despite-001542/

OnBaseMachine
03-17-2010, 11:45 PM
John Fay asked Jocketty a few Chapman related questions after his start today:


–Could he make the team as a reliever? “That has not been discussed. Probably not.”

–Because qualifying arbitration by 2012 affects his contract, will that be a factor in the decision if he makes the team? “If he’s good enough to make the team, no. We look at that with all our players, but it doesn’t affect the decisions we make.”

–Chapman threw 118 innings last year in Cuba. Will you limit his number of innings because of that? “We haven’t put a number on it. but we’ll watch pitch counts and the stress on his arm. We monitor that with all our pitchers.”


read the rest here:
http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/17/3-chapman-questions-for-jocketty/

OnBaseMachine
03-17-2010, 11:55 PM
Mark Sheldon article:


Most importantly, he was throwing strikes.

"For the most part, I felt really good about the command of my pitches today," Chapman said, with Class A Dayton pitching coach Tony Fossas translating. "Some of them were a little bit away. I threw a lot more sliders and fastballs today. I felt good with it today. There were less changeups."


http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100317&content_id=8820544&vkey=news_cin&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

Hal McCoy - Chapman adapting to life in states, on field


While Chapman is trying to absorb his new culture, he also has fits of loneliness or homesickness.

“Yonder Alonzo’s Cuban mother fixes him food and so does coach Juan “Porky” Lopez,” said Baker. “The other day he wanted some Cuban rice and beans so Lopez (Puerto Rican bullpen coach) fixed some for him.

“But the kid is trying,” Baker added. “A lot of Latins don’t even try to speak English, but he is trying to learn.”


http://www.foxsportsohio.com/pages/landing_reds?Chapman-adapting-to-life-in-states-on-fi=1&blockID=199296&feedID=4017

OnBaseMachine
03-17-2010, 11:58 PM
Mike Bauman: Chapman living up to the hype


Watching Chapman at work, while sitting behind home plate, there was little doubt that the crowd of 3,561 at Goodyear Ballpark was in on a special occurrence. The bulk of Milwaukee's regulars were in the lineup, a notable exception being first baseman Prince Fielder, who was not on hand to face this left-handed phenom. In one stretch, Chapman struck out five of six hitters and appeared to be nothing less than dominant.

Chapman's delivery is smooth enough that it does not suggest extreme velocity. He is 6-foot-4 and listed at 185 pounds, but he appears even more slender than that. His arms are long, even for his 6-foot-4 frame, and between that length and his velocity, his pitches appear to be in the zone and on the hitter almost instantaneously.


full article:
http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20100317&content_id=8823876&vkey=news_cin&fext=.jsp&c_id=cin

Blitz Dorsey
03-18-2010, 10:22 AM
Here is a blurb from CBS Sports on Chapman:

Chapman continues to dominate

Aroldis Chapman, SP CIN
News: Reds SP Aroldis Chapman, a Cuban defector who signed with the team this offseason, continued to wow onlookers with his third gem in three opportunities Wednesday against the Brewers. He allowed one run on one hit and one walk in three innings, recording five strikeouts. "He had a nasty sinker, a two-seamer we didn't even know he had," manager Dusty Baker told the Cincinnati Enquirer. "He's slowly but surely adding to his repertoire of pitches. He's feeling more confident." Baker wasn't the only one impressed. "He's their best pitcher," a National League scout said. "How can they think about starting him in the minors?"
Analysis: Chapman was thought to have some control problems when the Reds signed him, but he says he made a mechanical adjustment to eliminate them. His 10 strikeouts compared to two walks this spring sure support his claim. The Reds might still opt to send him to the minors just so he'll have an easier time adjusting culturally, but if he continues to pitch this way, he might force their hand. His ace stuff, including his 100-mph heat, makes him a terrific sleeper in all Fantasy formats.

OnBaseMachine
03-18-2010, 12:27 PM
C. Trent has some video up from Chapman's start yesterday:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buuFK2cfi18&feature=player_embedded

http://cnati.com/spring-training-2010/-goodyear-ariz---despite-001542/

dougdirt
03-18-2010, 02:42 PM
From Jorge Arangure on twitter

#overratedcontract RT @injuryexpert: Good source reminds me Reds have incentive to send Chapman down - has opt out based on service time

reds44
03-18-2010, 02:50 PM
The only reason he would start in the minors is his contract.

dougdirt
03-18-2010, 02:59 PM
The only reason he would start in the minors is his contract.

I don't think that is true. You start him there to limit his pitches and innings. You can also start him there to ease his transition to the different culture he will be adapting to.

KronoRed
03-18-2010, 03:04 PM
The only reason he would start in the minors is his contract.

Which is exactly why he should.

LoganBuck
03-18-2010, 03:04 PM
I don't think that is true. You start him there to limit his pitches and innings. You can also start him there to ease his transition to the different culture he will be adapting to.

Crappy weather may be another consideration. I doubt the kid has pitched in temperatures under 50 degrees.

membengal
03-18-2010, 03:15 PM
Crappy weather may be another consideration. I doubt the kid has pitched in temperatures under 50 degrees.

True. It's MUCH warmer is L'ville than Cincy in April.

membengal
03-18-2010, 03:16 PM
I don't think that is true. You start him there to limit his pitches and innings. You can also start him there to ease his transition to the different culture he will be adapting to.

Because nothing says easing into American culture like Zebulon, NC?

Plus Plus
03-18-2010, 03:17 PM
From Jorge Arangure on twitter

#overratedcontract RT @injuryexpert: Good source reminds me Reds have incentive to send Chapman down - has opt out based on service time

But this opt-out wouldn't affect the 6 years that he 'belongs' to the Reds in any way other than monetarily, right?

dougdirt
03-18-2010, 03:18 PM
Because nothing says easing into American culture like Zebulon, NC?

The team seems to think the minors would ease the transition more than Cincinnati would.

membengal
03-18-2010, 03:19 PM
The team seems to think the minors would ease the transition more than Cincinnati would.

Based on what exactly? Folks you have talked to?

KronoRed
03-18-2010, 03:19 PM
Because nothing says easing into American culture like Zebulon, NC?

Well the weather would be better.

membengal
03-18-2010, 03:21 PM
Well the weather would be better.

Just trying to keep track of all the excuses to send him down.

dougdirt
03-18-2010, 03:23 PM
But this opt-out wouldn't affect the 6 years that he 'belongs' to the Reds in any way other than monetarily, right?

I honestly have no idea.

membengal
03-18-2010, 03:29 PM
And, if Walt is to be believed from his conversation with Fay as recounted by Fay last night, contract is not an issue in their decision, and all options are on the table at this point.

edabbs44
03-18-2010, 03:29 PM
It's a marathon, not a race.

What's his first milestone for contract purposes?

dougdirt
03-18-2010, 03:30 PM
Based on what exactly? Folks you have talked to?

Based on stuff I don't know about at all. But that is what just about everyone has said within baseball, and not just with the Reds.

Caveat Emperor
03-18-2010, 03:38 PM
And, if Walt is to be believed from his conversation with Fay as recounted by Fay last night, contract is not an issue in their decision, and all options are on the table at this point.

Do you honestly expect Walt to give an answer like: "Well, we know he's a huge talent, but we've gotta think about how much this is going to cost us if he becomes a Super Two down the line."

membengal
03-18-2010, 03:41 PM
Do you honestly expect Walt to give an answer like: "Well, we know he's a huge talent, but we've gotta think about how much this is going to cost us if he becomes a Super Two down the line."

Nope, but Walt could say, "no matter how good he's looked, we think he needs a few months on the farm, and he's headed there shortly". That's what Washington did with Strasburg. I have been waiting for that from the Reds, and they have not done it. That makes me think they are seriously considering letting him start in Cincy.

klw
03-18-2010, 03:54 PM
C. Trent has some video up from Chapman's start yesterday:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buuFK2cfi18&feature=player_embedded

http://cnati.com/spring-training-2010/-goodyear-ariz---despite-001542/

I don't know what is my favorite moment in this- if it is the guy selling soda who has them balanced on his head or the kid selling beer who you can read his lips as he says "Cold Beer". (I guess you can hear him too if your speakers are turned on unlike mine). At least one of the changeups his arm speed is noticeably slower. (Chapman's arm speed not the beer kid's)

REDblooded
03-18-2010, 03:59 PM
Based on stuff I don't know about at all. But that is what just about everyone has said within baseball, and not just with the Reds.

I think a lot of people are just assuming that with less pressure the adjustment will be easier...

I'm really not sure this is the case though... I think the best bet is to surround him with as many latin players as possible and that will help more than whether or not the games mean as much...

Sea Ray
03-18-2010, 04:21 PM
But this opt-out wouldn't affect the 6 years that he 'belongs' to the Reds in any way other than monetarily, right?

Under no circumstances can he leave as a free agent before 6 yrs unless a new CBA changes the existing rules. If the Reds leave him in the minors for a couple months, it'll become 7 years and he'll be arbitration eligible in 4 yrs rather than 3.

RedsManRick
03-18-2010, 04:54 PM
Per cot's:

Aroldis Chapman lhp
6 years/$30.25M (2010-15)


6 years/$30.25M (2010-15)

signed by Cincinnati as an amateur free agent 1/11/10
$16.25M signing bonus ($1.5M at signing; $1.5M each Nov. 1, 2010-13; $1.25M each Nov. 1, 2014-20)
10:$1M, 11:$1M, 12:$2M, 13:$2M, 14:$3M, 15:$5M player option
Chapman must decide whether to accept or decline 2015 player option within 5 days after end of 2014 World Series
if Chapman qualifies for arbitration after 2012, $5M is converted to a bonus and he becomes arbitration-eligible
if Chapman qualifies for arbitration after 2013, $3M is converted to a bonus and he becomes arbitration-eligible
defected from Cuba to Netherlands 7/1/09
agent: Rodney Fernandez, Hendricks Sports
ML service: 0.000


So basically, whenever he becomes arb eligible, the rest of his contract gets converted to a bonus and he becomes arb eligible. I'm not sure how this would impact his 2015 player option. But if the option is still in play in 2015 and he turns it down, he would still be under Reds control and eligible for arbitration as it would be his 6th year with the Reds. It's possible, if he were to spend significant time in the minors, that his 3 year arb period would carry him in to 2016.

The big risk here is not the conversation of the salary to the bonus, but that if he's good enough to be arb eligible, he's going to get PAID.

mth123
03-18-2010, 07:58 PM
Put me down for 125 Innings in the AAA rotation and a call-up to the pen at around the trade deadline. Rotation in 2011.

Scrap Irony
03-18-2010, 08:44 PM
Is that your guess as to what happens, mth? Because that seems seriously conservative, if so.

My guess is the Reds put him in AAA for six weeks, then call him up in mid-May. Either that or he goes north with the big team.

mth123
03-18-2010, 08:55 PM
Is that your guess as to what happens, mth? Because that seems seriously conservative, if so.

My guess is the Reds put him in AAA for six weeks, then call him up in mid-May. Either that or he goes north with the big team.

Not my guess as to what will happen, but its what I'd do and Chapman hasn't done enough yet to change my mind. He's still only 21 and deep in the injury nexus. I'd be careful with those innings, I'd acclimate him to cold weather in the minors, I'd let him dabble in the majors in the pen (after Rhodes is likely dealt at the deadline), I'd give Maloney and maybe Wood a chance to take their turn first and I'd reap the benefits built into his contract by waiting.

I'm as excited about the kid as much as anyone and think he'll be a TOR guy in the next year or two, but a long stint of 3 innings in Spring Training isn't an indication that he's ready to go through a major league line-up three times now and there are too many big picture reasons to wait. The innings/age combo are my primary concern more so than the contract.

I don't think the Reds have the horses on offense to finish higher than 4th, so I wouldn't throw those benefits away to rush him up in the name of winning now. Its as much a desperation move that ignores the future as signing a $12 Million per year closer like Cordero or a starter like Milton for 3 years and $27 Million.

klw
03-19-2010, 03:48 PM
Soto is not working with Chapman?
http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/entries/2010/03/19/random_thoughts_on_a_cold_rain.html?cxtype=feedbot


ABOUT THE only thing Aroldis Chapman seems to struggle with is his change-up. And every morning, sitting not 10 feet away from Chapman, is Reds special instructor Mario Soto, who owned one of the all-time best change-ups.

I asked Soto, “What kind of change-up does Chapman throw?”

“I don’t know,” said Soto.

“Aren’t you helping him with his change-up?” I asked.

“No,” said Soto. “Nobody has asked me. If they do, I’ll be glad to help. I’m here. They know it. But I’m not messing with that kid until they ask me.”

OnBaseMachine
03-21-2010, 03:59 PM
From John Fay's twitter:

NL scout on Chapman: He throws harder than Strasburg and his slider is better.

http://twitter.com/johnfayman

LoganBuck
03-21-2010, 04:47 PM
Soto is not working with Chapman?
http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/entries/2010/03/19/random_thoughts_on_a_cold_rain.html?cxtype=feedbot

And there we have the conspiracy to send Chapman down.

I can hear it now. They are going to have Soto work with Chapman to refine his changeup. See you on Memorial Day.

wally post
03-21-2010, 05:01 PM
Logan, I hope you are right. yes sir!!

Sea Ray
03-21-2010, 05:31 PM
With all the talk on this board about arbitration eligibility and May 15th, I think we've lost sight of FA eligibility and that's probably more important. They can put his free agent eligibility off a full year if they send him to the minors for a few days. I'm sure this reality is well known in the Reds front office.

What they really need is for him to get drilled in an outting.

OnBaseMachine
03-22-2010, 11:46 AM
From Hal McCoy:


The early plan was that Chapman probably would start the season at Class AA Charlotte or Class AAA Louisville. But so far this spring, Chapman stands head and shoulders, both physically at 6-4 and in results, over the other candidates for the No. 5 spot in the Cincinnati Reds rotation.

“They though he would have control problems, but he hasn’t,” said Fossas. “Even the pitches that are not strikes are close. He doesn’t throw pitches way out of the zone, way high or way wide. And I’ve noticed, too, that the spring training strike zone is very tight.”


read the rest here:
http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/entries/2010/03/21/as_one_might_expect_tony.html?cxtype=feedbot

OnBaseMachine
03-22-2010, 12:31 PM
From John Fay:


“There are some things we’re rushing Chapman on – bunting, base-running, when to tag, when to run, when not to run,” Baker said. “Wood and Leake are more advanced with that. It would be easier on Chapman if he was in the American League and never had to hit and run the bases.”

“As far as being on the bases and bunting, he’s probably at the low minor league stage. As far as throwing, he’s at the big league stage.”


http://cincinnati.com/blogs/reds/2010/03/22/decisions-decisions/

Cedric
03-22-2010, 12:56 PM
Soto is not working with Chapman?
http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/cincinnatireds/entries/2010/03/19/random_thoughts_on_a_cold_rain.html?cxtype=feedbot

I can understand this right now. Information overload possibly? This whole spring is a crazy new world for Chapman.

OnBaseMachine
03-22-2010, 01:18 PM
John Fay article - Aroldis Chapman picking up the language


GOODYEAR, Ariz. - Aroldis Chapman walked by Darren Baker the other day and said:

"What's up?"

Darren reported to his father, Reds manager Dusty, that Chapman had spoken his first words of English to him.

Actually, Chapman has been speaking a few words of English since he arrived in Reds camp.


complete article:
http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20100322/SPT04/3210383/1071/Chapman+picking+up+English

membengal
03-22-2010, 01:33 PM
C. Trent has this in his daily TOL piece on cnati:


I think too many people are worried about the contract situation with Chapman, the people inside the organization I talk to -- and these are people with intimate knowledge of the contract -- say it's not even a concern. At most, it'll cost them a couple more million, but if he earns that, it's worth it. And remember, the big man isn't a very patient man.

http://www.cnati.com/blogs/ctrent/

BCubb2003
03-22-2010, 01:48 PM
They don't run the bases in Cuba?

Ron Madden
03-22-2010, 01:50 PM
They aint pay'n him to run the bases. ;)

Sea Ray
03-22-2010, 03:07 PM
C. Trent has this in his daily TOL piece on cnati:


I think too many people are worried about the contract situation with Chapman, the people inside the organization I talk to -- and these are people with intimate knowledge of the contract -- say it's not even a concern. At most, it'll cost them a couple more million, but if he earns that, it's worth it. And remember, the big man isn't a very patient man.

http://www.cnati.com/blogs/ctrent/

Yeah, people inside RZ are what CTrent is referring to. We've had reports that it'd cost the Reds an extra $30-35mill if he pitches in Cincinnati at all before May 15th.

CTrent's sources say that at most it'll cost them a couple more million, that's a far cry from what's been thrown around here and it sounds much more reasonable.

We all know the rules of arbitration eligibility and he will not be arbitration eligible for at least 3 more years no matter what. If he spends a couple months in the minors over the next 3 yrs he likely won't qualify for a Super Two and it'll be 4 yrs (November 2013) before he's arbitration eligible. I think we can put the $30 mill/May 15th stuff to bed...

dougdirt
03-22-2010, 03:57 PM
Yeah, people inside RZ are what CTrent is referring to. We've had reports that it'd cost the Reds an extra $30-35mill if he pitches in Cincinnati at all before May 15th.

CTrent's sources say that at most it'll cost them a couple more million, that's a far cry from what's been thrown around here and it sounds much more reasonable.

We all know the rules of arbitration eligibility and he will not be arbitration eligible for at least 3 more years no matter what. If he spends a couple months in the minors over the next 3 yrs he likely won't qualify for a Super Two and it'll be 4 yrs (November 2013) before he's arbitration eligible. I think we can put the $30 mill/May 15th stuff to bed...

The contract issue isn't so much about money, its about controlling him that extra full season at age 27/28 instead of losing him. If the Reds bring him up in April, there is a chance we only get him from 2010-2014 if he hits Super Two (while unlikely, its possible). Its much more likely that its 2010-2015. If they hold him down until June 1st, its almost a guarantee that we have him from June 2010-2016.

membengal
03-22-2010, 04:01 PM
Says that guy from Yahoo that you keep citing. And not much of anyone else. But, hey, let's fire up that merry-go-round again. Swell.

dougdirt
03-22-2010, 04:08 PM
Says that guy from Yahoo that you keep citing. And not much of anyone else. But, hey, let's fire up that merry-go-round again. Swell.

No, says the rules of baseball. He isn't a free agent until he gets 6 years of service time, unless he becomes a Super 2, then its 5 years. So if you bring him up in April and he never gets sent down and he becomes a Super Two (outside chance), then he is only here for 5 years, or 2010-2014. If he doesn't qualify as a Super 2, and is never sent down, you get 6 years of service time and its now 2010-2015. However if you keep him down until June, he can't become a Super 2 at all and won't get to 6 years service time until the 2016 season and then become a FA after then, so you get him from 2010 in June until the end of the 2016 season.

membengal
03-22-2010, 04:19 PM
Stuff like that is mind-numbing, Doug. Mind. Numbing. Horrible boring. I don't care. And, happily, the Reds, if C. Trent is to be believed, are not all that bound up over it. So why do we have to beat that particular horse to death? Seriously, why?

If his on-field performance warrants it, I hope they bring him north, because that would give the team the best chance to win. I am so tired of ledger-sheet debates over stuff that, frankly, NO ONE on this board really is certain about with regard to Chapman's contract.

dougdirt
03-22-2010, 04:26 PM
Stuff like that is mind-numbing, Doug. Mind. Numbing. Horrible boring. I don't care. And, happily, the Reds, if C. Trent is to be believed, are not all that bound up over it. So why do we have to beat that particular horse to death? Seriously, why?

If his on-field performance warrants it, I hope they bring him north, because that would give the team the best chance to win. I am so tired of ledger-sheet debates over stuff that, frankly, NO ONE on this board really is certain about with regard to Chapman's contract.

I don't care if its mind numbing or not. It is what it is, the truth. We aren't beating it to death, we are simply clearing it all up.

membengal
03-22-2010, 04:33 PM
Nope, you are beating it to death. In every thread. The discussion isn't over what's best for the Reds on the field, or what's best for the Chapman, it's over what saves the most nickels for the Reds. And no matter how you dress that up, I hate that discussion. I loathe that about modern-day baseball, it chokes the life out of the joy of the game.

dougdirt
03-22-2010, 04:34 PM
Nope, you are beating it to death. In every thread. The discussion isn't over what's best for the Reds on the field, or what's best for the Chapman, it's over what saves the most nickels for the Reds. And no matter how you dress that up, I hate that discussion. I loathe that about modern-day baseball, it chokes the life out of the joy of the game.
No, you are completely missing a large chunk of what I am saying. There is a VERY large contigency who will tell you that having Chapman for the entire 2016 season is better for the Reds than having him for the first two months of the 2010 season.

membengal
03-22-2010, 04:36 PM
Apparently not in the Reds front office, not necessarily.

And, hey, while we're here, since when did we start planning on pitchers six years from now? IF Chapman is ready now, let's use up those miles on his arm with pitches that matter, rather than in AAA or AA. The clock us running on all pitcher's arms, no?

membengal
03-22-2010, 04:39 PM
Look, Chapman may get lit up in an hour, and make it clear that he should be in the minors next month. If so, fine. But I really want the Reds to base their decision on what's best for the team on the field trying to win games, and for Chapman's development. I am not willing to admit that the best thing for the both is for him to be in the minors. Not yet. Not at this time. And certainly not if the ONLY reason they are sending him down is to play hide-the-ball with Super 2 rules.