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View Full Version : Beaning, Retribution, and when is it ok?



SirFelixCat
03-05-2010, 11:42 AM
I didn't see a thread on this and I'm surprised, tbh.


So, for those that missed it last season, Prince Fielder of the Brewcrew hit a walk-off HR off the Giants in an important game. He hit it, immediately started running, ran the bases at a good pace (ie. didn't slowly trot etc.), and when he got to home plate, the whole team was there to greet him, just like every other team does. But when he stepped on home plate, the whole team fell like bowling pins. It was obviously scripted and pretty damn funny.


So fast forward to yesterday. Zito on the mound, Fielder up in their ST game. Zito plunks Fielder on his behind on the first pitch. Fielder picks up the ball, tosses it to Zito and jogs down to 1B w/o anything else going on. Afterward, he said he hoped that that ended 'it'.

So I'm driving home from the dog park this morning, listening to Mike and Mike on ESPN radio and Golic is losing his mind about this, and, imho, correctly so. He's saying that in no way did he show up the opposing pitcher or team and they just celebrated a walk-off win in a big game. This wasn't during the 4th inning or whatnot, so why does he get hit?!?


I totally agree w/ him. Now, I'm a pitcher and I'm VERY old-school when it comes to a lot of things in baseball. I'm all for plunking a guy (never up high, obv) if he shows up the pitcher or any member of your team. Sure, I get that. But for celebrating a walk-off? This makes no sense.

So what do you guys think?


PS. Tim Kurkjin came on and told the story of a relief pitcher who gave up a HR to a guy and he was highly peturbed by the guy taking, what he felt, was WAY too long to round the bases. Well, being a RP, he didn't see him again for a few years. Fast forward 3 years later...the hitter has since been traded to the same team as the RP. During BP in ST that year, the RP plunks the hitter w/ a fastball right in the back. The hitter was like, "?!?!?!?!?". The RP told him it was for him running the bases too slow 3 years ago and this was the first time he got to face him again. The hitter said, "Well, ok, hopefully that's all done w/ now!":evil::laugh::clap:

Hoosier Red
03-05-2010, 11:48 AM
Warning, I think I'm going to go back and forth on this issue like an Arby's curly fry.

I think the whole retribution being carried over is a bit ridiculous, but there's no way you could interpret the Brewers celebration as anything other than "showing up the other team."
That said, I have no problem with either's reactions. Show the other team up fine, not the most sporting thing in the world but quite honestly the world needs some unbridled joy every once in a while.

And if the Giant's take offense, fine, the way he did it was not going to hurt Fielder, he simply showed that the Giants were rubbed the wrong way and didn't appreciate being shown up like that. Now Fielder got to take his base in a meaningless exhibition, the Giants feel better and everyone's happy.

SirFelixCat
03-05-2010, 11:51 AM
How is celebrating a walk-off win in almost any fashion short of pointing at the other team and yelling "Na nah na na nah!" considered showing them up?!?

Like I said, I'm totally old-school in many regards surrounding this. You DO NOT stand at home plate and admire a HR. You DO NOT sllllllllllllllllllllowly run around the bases on a HR, etc. But celebrating a walk-off HR once you get to home plate? Yeah, I don't see a problem w/ this in the least.

Hoosier Red
03-05-2010, 11:54 AM
You may be right, but the fact that it's a choreographed thing shows up the other team more than where and when it happens.

But there's really no right or wrong answer here, I can't tell you that I'm 100% convicted in my feelings.

SirFelixCat
03-05-2010, 11:58 AM
I hear ya, and not trying to come across as attacking you...not at all. I just don't see how this is showing up the other team/pitcher. Now, the other things I mentioned, sure, you're getting plunked for them. But this...notsomuch. I'm just really curious how others feel about this and the whole retribution thing in general.

Eric_the_Red
03-05-2010, 12:11 PM
I doubt the Brewers planned the celebration for when the hit a walk off HR against the Giants. It was probably planned for their next walk off homer.

I see nothing wrong with the celebration. Honestly, I think baseball needs more of this type of enthusiasm. He didn't point to the pitcher, or do anything else that would make you think he was showing up the other pitcher/team. He just won the game and was happy- go fig.

The moment in question is actually on Fielder's 2010 Topps card. I pulled it a few days ago and chuckled.

bucksfan2
03-05-2010, 12:11 PM
Prince deserved to get hit in that manner. A change up to the butt in a spring training game is a good way to pay him back.

I have never seen anything like what the Brewers did. It was scripted and I thought a little immature for the whole team to do so. I have no problem celebrating a walk off home run, but to plan it like that deserved some retaliation.

Phhhl
03-05-2010, 12:12 PM
I hated it, and I hate Fielder. He is one heck of a hitter, but the guy hangs out over the plate and takes the most vicious cuts in the league, as if he owns the thing. If I were a pitcher, the guy would be black and blue from all the times I drilled him in the ribs, even if my face was black and blue from all the times he hit me in the face. I cannot stand it when our pitchers let that guy wind up and twist himself into knots trying to knock a pitch into the ozone layer.

Very galling act by Mr. Fielder, even without the histrionic complicity of his teammates.

klw
03-05-2010, 12:43 PM
21 years ago on my college team a teammate spit at my shoes in the dugout because he said they were the wrong color. Later that day in practice we were scrimmaging and I had the guy 0-2. I thought about throwing the next one up and in. Instead, I threw something that he could handle enough to get a weak single. I have always regretted it and SF has freed me up. If I ever face Wanzenburg at an alumni game, I am brushing back that sorry middle age guy.

Bumstead
03-05-2010, 01:03 PM
I hated it, and I hate Fielder. He is one heck of a hitter, but the guy hangs out over the plate and takes the most vicious cuts in the league, as if he owns the thing. If I were a pitcher, the guy would be black and blue from all the times I drilled him in the ribs, even if my face was black and blue from all the times he hit me in the face. I cannot stand it when our pitchers let that guy wind up and twist himself into knots trying to knock a pitch into the ozone layer.

Very galling act by Mr. Fielder, even without the histrionic complicity of his teammates.

This is almost as entertaining as the Brewers celebration. I thought the Brewers were just having some fun, celebrating Fielder's size and obvious hitting ability, not to mention celebrating a win! Heaven forbid these guys have some fun after the game is over and then have the other team not take it personally. I think pitchers should throw inside more and take back that part of the plate but that celebration had nothing to do with the Giants. Hell, when I pitch in slow pitch softball and someone stands right on top of the plate, I lob the ball right into the batters box...really, I do. So I understand, but I disagree in this instance.

Bum

RedsManRick
03-05-2010, 01:29 PM
It was a walk off HR. The game was over and his team was celebrating on the field. Fielder deserves to get hit because their method of celebration was coordinated and funny? Get over yourself. Don't be embarrassed that he "showed you up". Be embarrassed that you gave up a walk off homer and cost your team a win.

If you want to plunk a guy who spike your SS or a pitcher who you think is throwing at your players, go for it. Heck, if you just want to be an intimidating jerk, go for it. And if a guy celebrates that way after a solo shot in the 2nd inning and you want to let him know that you think he's being an idiot by giving him a free pass to 1B, go for it; you're only hurting yourself.

But the idea of being "shown up" and feeling like you have to retaliate is hogwash. Not beaning him isn't going to make people think you're soft. And beaning him isn't going stop him from doing something similar in the same situation. Team's do it because it helps them maintain their collective ego after being embarrassed on the field and such pettiness doesn't prove anything.

Mario-Rijo
03-05-2010, 01:41 PM
21 years ago on my college team a teammate spit at my shoes in the dugout because he said they were the wrong color. Later that day in practice we were scrimmaging and I had the guy 0-2. I thought about throwing the next one up and in. Instead, I threw something that he could handle enough to get a weak single. I have always regretted it and SF has freed me up. If I ever face Wanzenburg at an alumni game, I am brushing back that sorry middle age guy.

Dude you cracked me up with that one.

On Fielder (and his teammates) I thought he did in fact show up the opposition. One thing missing from the discussion here is what Fielder did after the teammates fell down. He leaned back a bit looked to the heavens and raised his arms out wide as if he was basking in the sun while standing on home plate. A "hey look at me" moment, bit much IMO especially when coupled with the bowling pin mates. And the other thing was that Fielder himself acted as though he was expecting it when he got plunked yesterday so all things combined I'd say he's deserving.

nate
03-05-2010, 02:27 PM
21 years ago on my college team a teammate spit at my shoes in the dugout because he said they were the wrong color. Later that day in practice we were scrimmaging and I had the guy 0-2. I thought about throwing the next one up and in. Instead, I threw something that he could handle enough to get a weak single. I have always regretted it and SF has freed me up. If I ever face Wanzenburg at an alumni game, I am brushing back that sorry middle age guy.

I hope you Wanzen his burg real good!

:cool:

kaldaniels
03-05-2010, 02:33 PM
Baseballs a funny sport, those of you who act like what Fielder did was fine. I completely understand in the grand scheme of things the celebration was no big deal. But if you think you can do something like that without any fear of retribution...think again.

RANDY IN INDY
03-05-2010, 02:35 PM
I hate all the choreographed stuff. Genuine, instantaneous team celebrations after a walkoff or big homerun are OK, but to make a choreographed show out of it is bush league and classless in my opinion.

westofyou
03-05-2010, 02:48 PM
Hitting a guy in the ribs is an acceptable retaliation move, especially for acts of goofyness that makes your team look bad.

Throwing at the head is never to be placed in the same context.

The key is knowing the difference between the two incidents.

TheNext44
03-05-2010, 02:57 PM
Bob Gibson threw at every batter the next AB after they hit a homer against him. I have no problem with that. Clearly I have no problem with what Zito did.

westofyou
03-05-2010, 03:08 PM
Bob Gibson threw at every batter the next AB after they hit a homer against him. I have no problem with that. Clearly I have no problem with what Zito did.

Pete Lacock hit a HR off Gibby in his last appearance

http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1975/B09030SLN1975.htm

The first time they faced each other in an old timers game Gibson drilled LaCock in the back, as he ran to 1st LaCock says, What gives Gibby?

Bob's reply.. I've been waiting for this moment.

RedsManRick
03-05-2010, 03:34 PM
Could somebody provide me the definition of "showing somebody up" that isn't just: a guy celebrating more than you think he's entitled to.

I'm asking this to spur conversation, not (just) because I'm a moron who doesn't already have an idea of what it means.

Phhhl
03-05-2010, 03:39 PM
This is almost as entertaining as the Brewers celebration. I thought the Brewers were just having some fun, celebrating Fielder's size and obvious hitting ability, not to mention celebrating a win! Heaven forbid these guys have some fun after the game is over and then have the other team not take it personally. I think pitchers should throw inside more and take back that part of the plate but that celebration had nothing to do with the Giants. Hell, when I pitch in slow pitch softball and someone stands right on top of the plate, I lob the ball right into the batters box...really, I do. So I understand, but I disagree in this instance.

Bum

I thought it was corny and rehearsed, straight from Ocho Cinco's playbook. But, to each their own, I guess. The celebration annoyed me, but the real point is that I think Fielder enjoys a degree of success that he could never have if pitchers just took the plate back from him a little bit. He hangs out over the plate and takes these garguantuan, wild hacks at everything. There is no doubt he would be a good hitter regardless, but his numbers are closer to Pujols and A-Rod territory than they should be with that approach at the plate. Teams need to keep busting the fat guy inside.

15fan
03-05-2010, 03:44 PM
Act like you've been there before and you'll be there again.

Act like an idiot rounding the bases, and expect a fastball in the ribs the next time you step into the batter's box.

It's part of the checks & balances in baseball.

westofyou
03-05-2010, 03:44 PM
Could somebody provide me the definition of "showing somebody up" that isn't just: a guy celebrating more than you think he's entitled to.

I'm asking this to spur conversation, not (just) because I'm a moron who doesn't already have an idea of what it means.

10-1 lead two outs in the top of the ninth, young hurler on the mound with the leading team at bat with a guy on 1st.

If the guy on 1st steals 2nd and 3rd then I'd say that's showing one up, or rubbing it in.

It's a mutual respect item, everyone loses, everyone wins, try and act like you've been there before before pouring salt in the losers wounds, and if you are the on the other side of the equation you'll return the favor someday.

RedsManRick
03-05-2010, 03:49 PM
10-1 lead two outs in the top of the ninth, young hurler on the mound with the leading team at bat with a guy on 1st.

If the guy on 1st steals 2nd and 3rd then I'd say that's showing one up, or rubbing it in.

That's an example. Useful perhaps, but certainly not a definition. (point being, one man's reasonable celebration might be another man's showing up)


It's a mutual respect item, everyone loses, everyone wins, try and act like you've been there before before pouring salt in the losers wounds, and if you are the on the other side of the equation you'll return the favor someday.

Why? Who's hurt by the other guy celebrating? Are baseball players really that soft that they have to have the other team protect their ego when they get beat? If you belong on the field, you'll have your day in the sun and can celebrate however you'd like. In a professional sport where everybody is expected to be the best in the world and get paid accordingly, I don't think winners should have to celebrate on the losers' terms or face retribution.

Though I suppose the counter-argument is that it's not a "rule" either way, just the reality of things. Losers have a method of retribution if they get their feelings hurt for whatever reason. If you don't want to get hit, don't "show up" your opponent. But as a fan, give me the celebration. So long as it doesn't disrupt the game itself (such as in the case of a walk-off homer), it's just one more fun thing watch.

Bumstead
03-05-2010, 03:52 PM
10-1 lead two outs in the top of the ninth, young hurler on the mound with the leading team at bat with a guy on 1st.

If the guy on 1st steals 2nd and 3rd then I'd say that's showing one up, or rubbing it in.

It's a mutual respect item, everyone loses, everyone wins, try and act like you've been there before before pouring salt in the losers wounds, and if you are the on the other side of the equation you'll return the favor someday.

So, softball example: I'm on first with the score 13-4 in the bottom of the 5th, no outs. Pop up to the catcher right behind the plate, he catches it, I tag up and take 2nd cause nobody covers; I score on a single on the next play and the game is over due to the 10-run rule. Is that showing somebody up? It wasn't my intention to do so, I just play as hard as I can all the time and I wanted the game to be over so they wouldn't have any opportunity to come back. I sensed some annoyance from them however...

RedsManRick
03-05-2010, 03:54 PM
So, softball example: I'm on first with the score 13-4 in the bottom of the 5th, no outs. Pop up to the catcher right behind the plate, he catches it, I tag up and take 2nd cause nobody covers; I score on a single on the next play and the game is over due to the 10-run rule. Is that showing somebody up? It wasn't my intention to do so, I just play as hard as I can all the time and I wanted the game to be over so they wouldn't have any opportunity to come back. I sensed some annoyance from them however...

I imagine this begs the question about showing somebody up with an action that's part of the mechanics of the game itself vs. some behavior that has no impact on the game itself.

I'm guessing WOY would argue that, in his example, the stolen base had no impact on the game itself and was therefore in the territory of showing up.

In the softball example, there's a stated expectation that a lead of less than 10 runs isn't safe. Once you've got the 10 run lead, they deem the outcome decided and just end the game rather than letting the farce continue and create the situation in which the losing team can be shown up.


By contrast, my softball team was getting beat badly by a team last year and the team refused to score their 10th run. Instead they did stupid stuff on the bases, used a kid's bat, bat from the wrong-side, let us score, etc. I would much rather have been 10-run ruled any day and our manager protested the game (not my choice) with the league since the umpire didn't put a stop to their antics.

Bumstead
03-05-2010, 03:54 PM
Act like you've been there before and you'll be there again.

Act like an idiot rounding the bases, and expect a fastball in the ribs the next time you step into the batter's box.

It's part of the checks & balances in baseball.

So, if the pitcher buzzes the guy high and inside in his next AB is it OK for the batter to let go of the bat on the next pitch "accidentally" aiming it at the pitchers mound? Both acts can cause severe injury, so tell me why it's ok for the pitcher but not the batter...

westofyou
03-05-2010, 03:58 PM
Softball never equals baseball, no matter how much one squints or how much beer one has.

As for "arguing" that one must never feel bad by others on-field actions I find that nothing more than pedantic approach to something that mines reaction in others emotions bucket, not the their logic bucket. Humans after all are apes and apes are prone to showing each other up in ferocious displays and in making the other apes feel bad about what they did to deserve the reaction

Bumstead
03-05-2010, 04:01 PM
I imagine this begs the question about showing somebody up with an action that's part of the mechanics of the game itself vs. some behavior that has no impact on the game itself.

I think in the end, it's all about somebody getting their feelings hurt. The pitcher makes and allows a walk-off HR and instead of blaming himself for the problem he takes it out on the batter for being happy about taking advantage of the pitcher's error.

In my case, I never said a word, but don't get mad at me if you aren't paying any attention. It was an easy out if you were.

As far as players standing on top of the plate, I have no problem with pitchers moving them back. Soriano's knee is practically in the strike zone; hit it. Carl Everetts back elbow was always in the strike zone; hit it. But pettiness over Fielder and his teammates celebrating a winning hit, get over it and make a better pitch next time.

Mario-Rijo
03-05-2010, 04:07 PM
That's an example. Useful perhaps, but certainly not a definition. (point being, one man's reasonable celebration might be another man's showing up)



Why? Who's hurt by the other guy celebrating? Are baseball players really that soft that they have to have the other team protect their ego when they get beat? If you belong on the field, you'll have your day in the sun and can celebrate however you'd like. In a professional sport where everybody is expected to be the best in the world and get paid accordingly, I don't think winners should have to celebrate on the losers' terms or face retribution.

Though I suppose the counter-argument is that it's not a "rule" either way, just the reality of things. Losers have a method of retribution if they get their feelings hurt for whatever reason. If you don't want to get hit, don't "show up" your opponent. But as a fan, give me the celebration. So long as it doesn't disrupt the game itself (such as in the case of a walk-off homer), it's just one more fun thing watch.

I guess my thinking is where does it end? I think choreographing it goes beyond what is fine. I have rarely had a problem with anything anyone has done when celebrating I am the type of guy that would probably not have problem showboating a bit myself. But I recognize that baseball is a gentlemans sport going in and there is a matter of respect you show your opponent as a part of being a gentleman.

RedsManRick
03-05-2010, 04:33 PM
I guess my thinking is where does it end? I think choreographing it goes beyond what is fine. I have rarely had a problem with anything anyone has done when celebrating I am the type of guy that would probably not have problem showboating a bit myself. But I recognize that baseball is a gentlemans sport going in and there is a matter of respect you show your opponent as a part of being a gentleman.

I argue that it ends when it gets in the way of the game itself. A celebration like that in the 4th inning would've deserved a response -- from the league. As far as the pitcher hitting the guy -- I guess he can do what he wants. Though if you ask me, I'd make all clearly intentional bean-balls an ejectable offense, as would any time a pitcher hits his 2nd player in an appearance. (the guy would have to get hit while the ball in the boundaries of the batter's box, however -- as the rule itself should read -- none of this Craig Biggio dangling armored elbow crap). A baseball is a potentially deadly weapon in the hands of a pitcher. He should only have the right to use it to intimidate hitters if he's got enough control so as to not put the guy's life on the line.

bucksfan2
03-05-2010, 04:35 PM
I argue that it ends when it gets in the way of the game itself. A celebration like that in the 4th inning would've deserved a response -- from the league. As far as the pitcher hitting the guy -- I guess he can do what he wants. Though if you ask me, I'd make all clearly intentional bean-balls an ejectable offense, as would any time a pitcher hits his 2nd player in an appearance. (the guy would have to get hit while the ball in the boundaries of the batter's box, however -- as the rule itself should read -- none of this Craig Biggio dangling armored elbow crap). A baseball is a potentially deadly weapon in the hands of a pitcher. He should only have the right to use it to intimidate hitters if he's got enough control so as to not put the guy's life on the line.

If Fielder wants to act like that, its his prerogative. He is free to do it whenever he wants. But now he knows if he does it against the Giants again he will find a ball in his ribs his next at bat. Right, wrong, or indifferent, if it happens again Fielder will likely find a ball in his ribs again.

Bumstead
03-05-2010, 04:43 PM
If Fielder wants to act like that, its his prerogative. He is free to do it whenever he wants. But now he knows if he does it against the Giants again he will find a ball in his ribs his next at bat. Right, wrong, or indifferent, if it happens again Fielder will likely find a ball in his ribs again.

So the pitcher can take it out on the batter by throwing at him; likewise if the batter doesn't like it can he throw the bat at the pitcher with the same lack of punishment from baseball? Both items could potentially end a career.

Baseball needs to punish the first guy that throws at somebody instead of the 2nd guy. The warning is useless; if it's worth a warning then the guy should be gone cause you are already saying it is on purpose. It all gets a little silly to be honest; check your ego at the door please.

Mario-Rijo
03-05-2010, 04:51 PM
I argue that it ends when it gets in the way of the game itself. A celebration like that in the 4th inning would've deserved a response -- from the league. As far as the pitcher hitting the guy -- I guess he can do what he wants. Though if you ask me, I'd make all clearly intentional bean-balls an ejectable offense, as would any time a pitcher hits his 2nd player in an appearance. (the guy would have to get hit while the ball in the boundaries of the batter's box, however -- as the rule itself should read -- none of this Craig Biggio dangling armored elbow crap). A baseball is a potentially deadly weapon in the hands of a pitcher. He should only have the right to use it to intimidate hitters if he's got enough control so as to not put the guy's life on the line.

SO what is to stop guys from doing it in the 4th if you allow the same thing in the 9th? Why is it ok in the 9th and not in the 4th? Because the game isn't over? Would it have really stalled the game much if at all? I think if you are choreographing you are not celebrating at all but merely showboating and in baseball it's known you don't do it or there are consequences for it. It's like the softball example you gave, you took exception to them doing whatever it was they wanted to do once they got the advantage, there is a line and they crossed it.

Mario-Rijo
03-05-2010, 05:00 PM
So the pitcher can take it out on the batter by throwing at him; likewise if the batter doesn't like it can he throw the bat at the pitcher with the same lack of punishment from baseball? Both items could potentially end a career.

Baseball needs to punish the first guy that throws at somebody instead of the 2nd guy. The warning is useless; if it's worth a warning then the guy should be gone cause you are already saying it is on purpose. It all gets a little silly to be honest; check your ego at the door please.

I suppose the difference being I've never seen a guy consistently throw a bat where he wanted to. But points well taken anyhow.

RFS62
03-06-2010, 07:59 AM
Heck, I don't think they went far enough. They should have lined up and gone all "Riverdance".

All the teams could start doing it, coming up with different routines. That would be awesome.

paintmered
03-06-2010, 08:27 AM
Mike Golic had a fantastic rant on this: http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/spring2010/news/story?id=4966405

Bumstead
03-06-2010, 10:32 AM
Golic is right and probably listening to the Giants whine about it in the locker room after the game would have sounded just like Golic when he was mocking Zito. If baseball is going to mimick the No Fun League (NFL) it should be in the way the finances are controlled not in the No Fun part.

Tony Cloninger
03-06-2010, 05:32 PM
So you want to turn into the joke that is NFL TD celebrations? Or just about any play that is made by a defensive player...at any time?

It's called over doing it. That was over doing it. I can barely take the pointing after pointing in the sky after every hit...or homer..or win. (Although I can understand after a win)

cincinnati chili
03-07-2010, 02:10 PM
Heck, I don't think they went far enough. They should have lined up and gone all "Riverdance".

All the teams could start doing it, coming up with different routines. That would be awesome.

Thank you. I'm not sure if this is tongue-in-cheek, but I'm glad to see someone who considers himself old school taking this position.

I think Mike Golic was 100% correct. Baseball needs to get over itself, get the stick out of its ass, and encourage rather than discourage this kind of thing.

If you haven't heard his rant:
http://a.espnradio.com/podcenter/bestofmm/bestofmm100305.mp3

I think the problem here is the failure to distinguish between taunting and celebrating. It isn't like Prince eyeballed and pointed at the pitcher as he went around the bases. The game was over. This was done for the fans. It was funny.

mth123
03-07-2010, 02:17 PM
Thank you. I'm not sure if this is tongue-in-cheek, but I'm glad to see someone who considers himself old school taking this position.

I think Mike Golic was 100% correct. Baseball needs to get over itself, get the stick out of its ass, and encourage rather than discourage this kind of thing.

If you haven't heard his rant:
http://a.espnradio.com/podcenter/bestofmm/bestofmm100305.mp3

I think the problem here is the failure to distinguish between taunting and celebrating. It isn't like Prince eyeballed and pointed at the pitcher as he went around the bases. The game was over. This was done for the fans. It was funny.

Not sure I fit into any school. Maybe call me a drop out from both, but I agree.

I say celebrate all you want. Stop the headhunting and stop all the charging the mound stuff as well.

George Anderson
03-07-2010, 02:29 PM
Baseball needs to punish the first guy that throws at somebody instead of the 2nd guy. The warning is useless; if it's worth a warning then the guy should be gone cause you are already saying it is on purpose. It all gets a little silly to be honest; check your ego at the door please.

I know under federation rules you can eject a pitcher for what you perceived as intentionally hitting some one without giving a warning but generally it is a bad idea. Unless the pitcher plunks the batter and then makes a gesture or says something that gives no doubt he intended to hit the batter then just give a warning. If you start dumping pitchers for hitting batters then you are potentially taking away the pitchers ability to throw inside. You also are ejecting a pitcher who may just has very bad control but had no intention of hurting anyone. The warning works very well because it keeps umpires from misinterpreting a hitter being hit as malicious conduct from the pitcher. Also just because you gave a warning doesn't mean the next batter who is hit means the pitcher must be ejected. It goes back to the umpires judgement and if the umpire didn't feel like it was intentional then regardless if a warning was already given, let it go.