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redsfan30
03-17-2010, 01:42 PM
According to ESPN breaking news. He admitted to a mistake and said he was sorry and embarrassed.

You have to wonder and hope that a certain former Reds outfielder doesn't have any connection to this story....

membengal
03-17-2010, 01:45 PM
That is absolutly less than ideal news for fans of Josh Hamilton. I am 100% certain that Hamilton does not need to be around a manager who uses.

edabbs44
03-17-2010, 01:50 PM
From the Dallas Morning News.


Though he was tested for drugs shortly after his use, it is not known if he failed. But, according to a source, because Washington came to MLB and confessed, he was exempt from suspension.


He told the Rangers' front office -- including team president Nolan Ryan and general manager Jon Daniels -- and turned himself in to the commissioner's office within days of the test.

http://rangersblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2010/03/rangers-ron-washington-used-co.html
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/spt/stories/031810dnsporangwashington.1b883a276.html

Complete BS...he only confessed because he knew it was likely he was going to fail. If he confessed w/o being tested, that would be a different story.

bucksfan2
03-17-2010, 01:50 PM
Im surprised that Ron Washington is still employed.

As for Hamilton I was thought the was drug tested randomly throughout the season. But I agree that this isn't an ideal situation for Josh.

Chip R
03-17-2010, 01:54 PM
As much as I'd like to think I have compassion for those who have trangressed, I'd have to give him the boot. I really don't think you can have someone like that around influencing young players who has done that sort of thing. Perhaps he can hook on with StL if he does get fired. They don't seem to have too high of standards.

Tom Servo
03-17-2010, 02:14 PM
I'd fire him.

TheNext44
03-17-2010, 02:22 PM
Cocaine is a big jump ahead of marijuana both in terms of illegality and risk for the user. It's one of the big ones that usually distinguishes a casual drug user from an addict. Even if Washington only used it once in his whole life, that time before he was tested, he had to know better, he had to know that his was a huge mistake that would put his ability to manage young players in jeopardy.

He should be fired for poor judgment alone.

Strikes Out Looking
03-17-2010, 02:26 PM
So if you confess you don't get suspended?

I would have fired him after he confessed and I'd fire him now.

WMR
03-17-2010, 02:29 PM
How do you justify keeping a manager who uses/used cocaine while the boss of your team?

westofyou
03-17-2010, 02:29 PM
Pitchforks and Torches!!!

The Just say No Generation is driving the car now.

Mistakes and human transgressions always can cause one a job, it's a lot easier making the call when you're not involved in the real decision.

TRF
03-17-2010, 02:32 PM
Pitchforks and Torches!!!

The Just say No Generation is driving the car now.

Mistakes and human transgressions always can cause one a job, it's a lot easier making the call when you're not involved in the real decision.

I fired a guy for less. He was fired because his continued presence disrupted my crew. As far as I know he wasn't doing drugs. Of course later we found out he was a pedophile.

Still... If Washington's cocaine use is disruptive to him doing his job, he should be let go.

RedsManRick
03-17-2010, 02:36 PM
Without the facts, it's beyond us to judge. But it's definitely unfortunate giving Hamilton's history.

edabbs44
03-17-2010, 02:40 PM
Pitchforks and Torches!!!

The Just say No Generation is driving the car now.

Mistakes and human transgressions always can cause one a job, it's a lot easier making the call when you're not involved in the real decision.

Is using coke really a "mistake"? IMO it was a very poor decision on his part, and much less of a mistake.

There is a difference.

TheNext44
03-17-2010, 02:41 PM
Pitchforks and Torches!!!

The Just say No Generation is driving the car now.

Mistakes and human transgressions always can cause one a job, it's a lot easier making the call when you're not involved in the real decision.

I can't speak for anyone else, but I am about as liberal as they come when it comes to criticizing for drug use. For me this is about poor judgment and not taking seriously your responsibilities as a leader of young men.

membengal
03-17-2010, 02:41 PM
Pitchforks and Torches!!!

The Just say No Generation is driving the car now.

Mistakes and human transgressions always can cause one a job, it's a lot easier making the call when you're not involved in the real decision.

They employ Josh Hamilton. Seems to me, there are other considerations than "just say no". It absolutely makes no sense for them to potentially endanger an asset like Hamilton. And a manager who is actively using cocaine sure seems like it adds an elements of uncertainty where there needs to be none with regard to Hamilton.

westofyou
03-17-2010, 02:48 PM
They employ Josh Hamilton. Seems to me, there are other considerations than "just say no". It absolutely makes no sense for them to potentially endanger an asset like Hamilton. And a manager who is actively using cocaine sure seems like it adds an elements of uncertainty where there needs to be none with regard to Hamilton.

Ron said this:


"I don't want this to be held over my head for the rest of my life and have this be the one thing that's associated with my name,'' he said. "I made a terrible mistake and all I can do is pray that I am forgiven for it and don't have to carry it for the rest of my life.''

Sounds contrite enough for me.

As for Hamilton, he's a big boy I'd worry more about his peers than his manager, shoot maybe they should just get Josh a giant plastic bubble to enwrap him in on the field and off the field.

TRF
03-17-2010, 03:02 PM
To me it's like being arrested for drunk driving a few days before your FBI background check.

poor poor judgement. And his job is ALL about judgement. I don't give a crap how it affects one player (Hamilton). If he's DUMB enough to use before a drug test he KNOWS is coming, then I don't want that judgement guiding my team.

savafan
03-17-2010, 03:09 PM
Maybe he was climbing through an air duct trying to save a baby and was passing under the room of Colombian drug lords who happened to drop some cocaine into the air shaft and then the fan started blowing and he ingested it. If that was the case, it was a mistake.

edabbs44
03-17-2010, 03:16 PM
Maybe he was climbing through an air duct trying to save a baby and was passing under the room of Colombian drug lords who happened to drop some cocaine into the air shaft and then the fan started blowing and it he ingested it. If that was the case, it was a mistake.

Or he thought it was Fun Dip or something like that.

Caveat Emperor
03-17-2010, 03:42 PM
Pitchforks and Torches!!!

I don't see what's "Pitchforks and Torches!!!" about having a zero-tolerance policy for people who admit to using a controlled substance that is, in most jurisdictions, a felony to even have possession of.

westofyou
03-17-2010, 03:46 PM
I don't see what's "Pitchforks and Torches!!!" about having a zero-tolerance policy for people who admit to using a controlled substance that is, in most jurisdictions, a felony to even have possession of.

When folks call automatically for firing a guy in a situation they have no knowledge of based on the past drug use of one of his players I'd have to say that's pretty much an Ox-Bow incident waiting to happen.

Zero tolerance is a pretty black and white subject IMO, and is a trap to nothing more than group think, the world is not black and white, it's a lovely shade of gray.

JaxRed
03-17-2010, 03:54 PM
Black and white...... Fired.

RichRed
03-17-2010, 03:58 PM
The Rangers are satisfied that this was a one-time incident because of the honesty he displayed after the drug use, and that Washington did not have a drug habit.

Habit? Maybe not. But what I'm skeptical of is the notion that a man just decided to give cocaine a whirl for the first time at the age of 57. But to his credit, Washington offered to resign and the Rangers declined.

How they handle it is up to them but I'd have a hard time keeping him on if it were up to me.

TRF
03-17-2010, 03:59 PM
Let's see. posession of cocaine? crime

using cocaine? crime.

but he has a job because he said sorry?

that's a crime too.

membengal
03-17-2010, 03:59 PM
I just can't beyond this:

It's easier to replace Ron Washington than Josh Hamilton. And what Washington did, given Hamilton's past, makes him a risk to a far more valuable company asset. Apology or no.

ETA: Unless Hamilton was about to do a line, and Washington flung himself in front of Hamilton and did it instead... (trying for some humor, please ignore if that goes too far)

Eric_the_Red
03-17-2010, 04:13 PM
If you are caught using drugs at my job, you are terminated immediately. I'm sure this is the case at my jobs in this country. Sorry or not, the Rangers would be justified to fire him if they have a drug policy.

15fan
03-17-2010, 04:15 PM
Let's see. posession of cocaine? crime

using cocaine? crime.

but he has a job because he said sorry?

that's a crime too.

Yep yep.

Perhaps one of the lawyers around here can weigh in: Is Coke (the powdery kind...) a misdemeanor or a felony?

reds44
03-17-2010, 04:15 PM
It's cocaine. How can anybody defend this? He should be fired.

TheNext44
03-17-2010, 04:25 PM
Yep yep.

Perhaps one of the lawyers around here can weigh in: Is Coke (the powdery kind...) a misdemeanor or a felony?

Not a lawyer, but I know it's varies state by state. It's a felony in Ohio and in Texas. In fact, Texas has some of the strictest drug laws in the country.


Code Section Health & Safety 481.001, et seq.
Possession Less than 1 g.: state jail felony; 1-4 g.: 3rd degree felony; 4-200 g.: 2nd degree felony; 200-400 g.: 1st degree felony; 400 g. and over: 10-99 yrs. or life at Texas Dept. of Criminal Justice institution and/or $100,000
Sale Less than 1 g.: state jail felony; 1-4 g.: 2nd degree felony; 4-200 g.: 1st degree felony; 200-400 g.: Texas Dept. of Criminal Justice institution for life or 10-99 yrs. and/or $100,000; 400 g. and over: Texas Dept. of Criminal Justice institution for life or 15-99 yrs. and/or $250,000; Delivery to minor under 17 who is enrolled in school: 2nd degree felony; Within drug-free zone: penalties doubled

It's a fifth degree felony for simple possession under a gram in most states.

westofyou
03-17-2010, 04:36 PM
In fact, Texas has some of the strictest drug laws in the country.
That's ok, when it comes time to document that fact they'll rewrite it to look different.

TheNext44
03-17-2010, 04:38 PM
That's ok, when it comes time to document that fact they'll rewrite it to look different.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

jmcclain19
03-17-2010, 04:40 PM
Does anyone honestly buy that as a 57 year old man, he suddenly tried this for the very first and only time, only days before he was tested?

Not really buying it, to be honest.

RichRed
03-17-2010, 04:43 PM
Does anyone honestly buy that as a 57 year old man, he suddenly tried this for the very first and only time, only days before he was tested?

Not really buying it, to be honest.

Someone once said:


But what I'm skeptical of is the notion that a man just decided to give cocaine a whirl for the first time at the age of 57.

Oh wait, that was me. :)

hebroncougar
03-17-2010, 05:11 PM
I'm shocked he's employed. That is nuts.

VR
03-17-2010, 05:15 PM
I'm sure MLB and the Rangers have protection for Washington since he admitted his use. Look for a mandatory treamtent center visit and requirements for increased drug testing. But yes, his job is most likely protected because of that little nugget.

westofyou
03-17-2010, 05:18 PM
I'm sure MLB and the Rangers have protection for Washington since he admitted his use. Look for a mandatory treamtent center visit and requirements for increased drug testing. But yes, his job is most likely protected because of that little nugget.

Correct, he's protected by his relationship with his employers.

Team Clark
03-17-2010, 05:50 PM
Maybe it was a "mistake" because he though he grabbed the pixie stick with sugar not the one with powder.

TRF
03-17-2010, 05:54 PM
Correct, he's protected by his relationship with his employers.

awe. some. Hey Ron Washington, you just committed a felony in the state you work, but that's ok, because you said sorry.

BTW had he walked into a police station, he'd have been arrested.

reds44
03-17-2010, 05:54 PM
I'm not going to be able to picture Ron Washington without thinking of this ever again.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqNC3WYMGO8&feature=related

VR
03-17-2010, 06:30 PM
awe. some. Hey Ron Washington, you just committed a felony in the state you work, but that's ok, because you said sorry.

BTW had he walked into a police station, he'd have been arrested.


Any employer of substance has an employee assistance program that will protect an employee in such a situation, as long as they come to them 'before they are caught', seeking help. Not sure how the timeline works with Washington, but that is the spirit.

As an 'employer of choice', we operate with a very open EAP program, knowing that our employees have issues. We would rather have our staff, including leaders, feel they can come to us...rather than withold for fear of shame and termination. The ultimate goal is restoration of the individual....with a balance that isn't hurting the organization. If Washington can get help....he, and the Rangers will be all the better for it.

The clarity also needs to be provided for accountability. At this point....outside of agreed upon treatment....it becomes zero tolerance.

mth123
03-17-2010, 07:58 PM
This doesn't need to be an either/or situation. He can be kicked upstairs to special assistant or something of that nature while keeping his salary and getting treatment. Meanwhile, somebody else could be named manager of the team on the field and in the clubhouse. Everybody wins and the team is protected from any lawsuit.

HumnHilghtFreel
03-17-2010, 08:21 PM
I didn't realize managers were tested too...

Chip R
03-17-2010, 08:37 PM
I didn't realize managers were tested too...

Me either.

Hoosier Red
03-17-2010, 08:46 PM
maybe either did Washington.

Sorry that's a cheap shot.

hebroncougar
03-17-2010, 08:59 PM
Any employer of substance has an employee assistance program that will protect an employee in such a situation, as long as they come to them 'before they are caught', seeking help. Not sure how the timeline works with Washington, but that is the spirit.

As an 'employer of choice', we operate with a very open EAP program, knowing that our employees have issues. We would rather have our staff, including leaders, feel they can come to us...rather than withold for fear of shame and termination. The ultimate goal is restoration of the individual....with a balance that isn't hurting the organization. If Washington can get help....he, and the Rangers will be all the better for it.

The clarity also needs to be provided for accountability. At this point....outside of agreed upon treatment....it becomes zero tolerance.

I would think it would be a little different, since he didn't admit to anything, until you know, he found out he was going to be tested. That's a bit different than walking into your employer's office and saying you have a problem and you need some help.

VR
03-17-2010, 09:04 PM
I would think it would be a little different, since he didn't admit to anything, until you know, he found out he was going to be tested. That's a bit different than walking into your employer's office and saying you have a problem and you need some help.

Looks like that, I don't know the exact timeline.

westofyou
03-17-2010, 10:29 PM
awe. some. Hey Ron Washington, you just committed a felony in the state you work, but that's ok, because you said sorry.

BTW had he walked into a police station, he'd have been arrested.

Because he admitted it?

No evidence?

mmmmkay....Texas, justice eh?

I'm seeing some pitchforks... where's the torches?

westofyou
03-17-2010, 10:30 PM
Me either.


Major league managers, coaches and other clubhouse personnel have been subject to drug testing since 2008, when MLB adopted the measure as one of George Mitchell's recommendations as part of his report regarding steroid and drug use in baseball. MLB mandates that any non-playing personnel who either fail a test or admit to drug use be subject to counseling and a substance-abuse program developed by a doctor approved by baseball. First-time offenders are generally not subject to punitive measures such as a suspension, pending the commissioner's discretion, and their names are not made public. (Tests are administered randomly once a year to all non-playing personnel who work around the clubhouse, which also includes trainers, clubhouse and equipment managers, massage therapists and traveling secretaries.) So by calling MLB headquarters even before his test results were known, Washington was subjecting himself to the substance-abuse program regardless of the results.

Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/baseball/mlb/03/17/washington/#ixzz0iUXFYnKg

cincrazy
03-17-2010, 11:38 PM
They employ Josh Hamilton. Seems to me, there are other considerations than "just say no". It absolutely makes no sense for them to potentially endanger an asset like Hamilton. And a manager who is actively using cocaine sure seems like it adds an elements of uncertainty where there needs to be none with regard to Hamilton.

I'm not sure how this affects Hamilton. I don't think his manager doing it makes it any more likely for him to do so. If Hamilton falls off the wagon again, he has nobody to blame but himself.

I think they made the right decision in keeping Washington. It's easy to demonize people, but the guy deserves a second chance. I don't think Josh Hamilton should be a factor in determining Ron Washington's fate.

Razor Shines
03-18-2010, 01:08 AM
ETA: Unless Hamilton was about to do a line, and Washington flung himself in front of Hamilton and did it instead... (trying for some humor, please ignore if that goes too far)

Hello!? Ron Washington, like Elvis before him, is a NARC. I don't know if Ron wears rhinestones on the job, but he'll do all the drugs he has to to keep them out of the hands of his players.


Seriously though, I think the Rangers have a right to do whatever they want, but if I where a fan of that team I'd want him fired.

919191
03-18-2010, 01:32 AM
awe. some. Hey Ron Washington, you just committed a felony in the state you work, but that's ok, because you said sorry.

BTW had he walked into a police station, he'd have been arrested.

How do we know if Washington did this in Texas? Yeah, perhaps trivial, but it might not have happened there.

I bet if you walked into a cop shop and said you did a line, they'ed blow you off.

Topcat
03-18-2010, 04:17 AM
End result will be Texas now will can him as soon as team slips and Washington will be finished as a MLB manager. His mistake will hurt him no other punishment is necessary.

Falls City Beer
03-18-2010, 08:56 AM
If we're talking about punishment fitting the crime, Tony Larussa should be behind bars, not managing a MLB team. He endangered the lives of others when he went driving around plowed out of his mind. But we shrug at that behavior. Cocaine? Eek. O holy Moses. Flay him!

I get it: the law is the law. Doesn't mean the law can't be crap and often totally unfitting to the circumstance.

Chip R
03-18-2010, 09:14 AM
If we're talking about punishment fitting the crime, Tony Larussa should be behind bars, not managing a MLB team. He endangered the lives of others when he went driving around plowed out of his mind. But we shrug at that behavior.


We do? Nice selective memory there. But that's par for the course for someone trying to elicit a reaction. :rolleyes:

Falls City Beer
03-18-2010, 09:45 AM
We do? Nice selective memory there. But that's par for the course for someone trying to elicit a reaction. :rolleyes:

I don't think I'm trying to get a reaction anymore than westofyou. I certainly don't recall near-universal agreement that Larussa should be fired--not just here, I mean "we" as a culture. What Larussa did was way, way worse, but as a society we just shrug or laugh at poor Tony the Drunk. Largely because we all know someone at the office who drives trashed, or we remember uncle Billy getting sauced and falling down the stairs. We laugh and we move on. Because, you know, alcohol is legal and cocaine isn't. Therefore, it's morally acceptable to get drunk but not to get high. WTH?

Roy Tucker
03-18-2010, 09:55 AM
Does anyone honestly buy that as a 57 year old man, he suddenly tried this for the very first and only time, only days before he was tested?

Not really buying it, to be honest.

Yeah, I had that same thought. I'm 57 and I've been to a lot of rodeos.

Washington is protected by an agreement with MLB. Reading about this incident, I've been impressed with the maturity and sensitivity in which its been handled. My employer would have canned me in about 2 seconds. But unless he's the second coming of John McGraw, I'd say his managerial career is toast.

westofyou
03-18-2010, 10:02 AM
I'd say his managerial career is toast.

Well he's on the shortest leash in the game right now, add in the fact that his team is about to be sold then the leash has even less slack.

Here's an interesting tid-bit.

http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/03/report-ron-washington-was-being-blackmailed.html.php



Then, however, came the blackmail threats.

Somebody, you see, did know. How or why he knew, thats unknown.

But this team employee, fired after the season, had all the details. He also had a list of demands for the club, which if not met would mean the Ron-does-dope story would suddenly become national news.

Some of his demands were met, but the club balked at personally giving this person a glowing letter of recommendation and also refused at least one other item. By January, word leaked that the former employee was bad-mouthing Washington around north Arlington.

Blackmailer was real unhappy, but all was still quiet as spring training opened in Arizona nearly four weeks ago. Then this week, Washington received a call from a national baseball writer saying he had the Ron-does-dope details.

Its uncertain if this is how the blackmailer made good on his threat to disgrace Washington and embarrass the ballclub, but Id definitely wager that way.

lollipopcurve
03-18-2010, 10:07 AM
Texas needs a fresh start -- it's in the tank.

Chip R
03-18-2010, 10:14 AM
Here's an interesting tid-bit.

http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/03/report-ron-washington-was-being-blackmailed.html.php


I wonder if that had something to do with the problems that the previous ownership had selling the Rangers?

TRF
03-18-2010, 12:46 PM
Because he admitted it?

No evidence?

mmmmkay....Texas, justice eh?

I'm seeing some pitchforks... where's the torches?
:rolleyes:

So, you walk into a police station in oregon, admit to drug use, cocaine use, and you won't be detained? no investigation?

ok

personally i prefer that if my employees do have a drug problem, and they KNOW they will be tested, well i prefer they be janitors and not guys that make decisions that could cost my company millions. I prefer they come to me and say i have a problem, not i used blow a few weeks before my drug test.

I grew up around addicts. My mom, my sister. my brothers. How I have never used is amazing even to me. I don't even drink. Maybe that makes me an extreme case. dunno, but I'd fire him just for being stupid.

But hey, thanks for ripping on my state.

pedro
03-18-2010, 12:52 PM
:rolleyes:

So, you walk into a police station in oregon, admit to drug use, cocaine use, and you won't be detained? no investigation?



You'd be searched and if you didn't have any drugs on you then there is nothing they could do. Perhaps they could get a search warrant and search your car and home but unless they thought you were dealing then they likely wouldn't bother.

The statutes are based on possession, not consumption.

FWIW, if you get caught with marijuana (under an ounce and in single container) in Oregon they write you ticket for a misdemeanor and send you on your way.

flyer85
03-18-2010, 01:09 PM
I am surprised he was not fired. It shows a huge lapse in judgment. (if he is telling the truth about a one time event). Is he really the person you want as a face of the organization

Roy Tucker
03-18-2010, 01:11 PM
From woy's post:



Major league managers, coaches and other clubhouse personnel have been subject to drug testing since 2008, when MLB adopted the measure as one of George Mitchell's recommendations as part of his report regarding steroid and drug use in baseball. MLB mandates that any non-playing personnel who either fail a test or admit to drug use be subject to counseling and a substance-abuse program developed by a doctor approved by baseball. First-time offenders are generally not subject to punitive measures such as a suspension, pending the commissioner's discretion, and their names are not made public. (Tests are administered randomly once a year to all non-playing personnel who work around the clubhouse, which also includes trainers, clubhouse and equipment managers, massage therapists and traveling secretaries.) So by calling MLB headquarters even before his test results were known, Washington was subjecting himself to the substance-abuse program regardless of the results.

Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/201...#ixzz0iUXFYnKg

VR
03-18-2010, 01:56 PM
:rolleyes:

So, you walk into a police station in oregon, admit to drug use, cocaine use, and you won't be detained? no investigation?

ok



In all seriousness.....they will most likely laugh at you. There is no money for police, jails, prosecutors in this city. The flipside is the climate is very accepting for any and all drug use. Walk around my business sometime with me.....I be we can easily find a dozen used heroin needles. Unless you are part of a major drug cartel, or a provider to someone who overdosed....you will be of little concern to that police station.

pedro
03-18-2010, 01:58 PM
In all seriousness.....they will most likely laugh at you. There is no money for police, jails, prosecutors in this city. The flipside is the climate is very accepting for any and all drug use. Walk around my business sometime with me.....I be we can easily find a dozen used heroin needles. Unless you are part of a major drug cartel, or a provider to someone who overdosed....you will be of little concern to that police station.

True, and certainly there some junkies floating around but Portland still is a very nice place to live and one of the safest cities in the country.

westofyou
03-18-2010, 02:00 PM
In all seriousness.....they will most likely laugh at you. There is no money for police, jails, prosecutors in this city. The flipside is the climate is very accepting for any and all drug use. Walk around my business sometime with me.....I be we can easily find a dozen used heroin needles. Unless you are part of a major drug cartel, or a provider to someone who overdosed....you will be of little concern to that police station.

You near Old Town?

The foot of the Burnside Bridge is a study in human frality.

VR
03-18-2010, 02:00 PM
True, and certainly there some junkies floating around but Portland still is a very nice place to live and one of the safest cities in the country.

without question....there are warts....but I think it's one of the best spots in the US.

VR
03-18-2010, 02:08 PM
You near Old Town?

The foot of the Burnside Bridge is a study in human frality.

Lloyd District

westofyou
03-18-2010, 02:14 PM
Lloyd District

Had a friend who was relocated there after his home caught fire, had to live in the area for 3 months, was not too happy.

We're moving to the Hollywood district in 3 months.

Oh and TRF I wasn't ripping Texas, it's a well known fact that Texas has a harsh law system compared to other states, and I would likely not be the first to elude to Texas styled justice.

VR
03-18-2010, 02:36 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/dallas/mlb/news/story?id=5005713

How about that? "Zero Tolerance moving forward". I feel like Tom Hicks read my post. ;)

bucksfan2
03-19-2010, 08:38 AM
This story just keeps getting better. There is the blackmail issue with that employee getting fired. Washington admitted to taking amphetamines during his playing days. Apparently the reason he came out is because the black mailer was about to go public with his evidence.

I could be completely in the wrong here, but I don't think cocaine is a one time drug. Especially in lieu of Washington saying he took amphetamines during his playing days. If you ask me Washington may not be an addict, but this isn't a one time deal. IMO the Rangers should have forced him to go to rehab. I just don't see a 50+ year old man risking his managerial position for a one time date with his ol' buddy "the rock". But then again a positive drug test won't get you fired from the Rangers.

M2
03-19-2010, 06:09 PM
Ron Washington grew up in a rough section of New Orleans, came of age in the late 1960s and played pro ball during the 1970s and 1980s. I'm guessing he's dabbled in all sorts of illegal substances. Doesn't really offend me. A lot of people his age, and I'm talking senior executive types, still party hard. They just don't get drug tested.

It was stupid of Washington to partake seeing that he is tested. Shouldn't be, but that's another matter. Bad choice on his part, but, and this is the important part, he's been a good manager. If this was an isolated incident, he's been a good manager. If this wasn't an isolated incident, he's STILL been a good manager.

Unless the guy is hooked and in a downward spiral, my take is cocaine schmocaine. Good managers are hard to find.

TRF
03-19-2010, 07:54 PM
Had a friend who was relocated there after his home caught fire, had to live in the area for 3 months, was not too happy.

We're moving to the Hollywood district in 3 months.

Oh and TRF I wasn't ripping Texas, it's a well known fact that Texas has a harsh law system compared to other states, and I would likely not be the first to elude to Texas styled justice.

i know, its just that makes it sound like i should be ashamed of the fact that Texas has a tough legal system.