PDA

View Full Version : Basic



TeamSelig
04-01-2010, 08:56 PM
I finally went to MEPS and enlisted with the Army National Guard this past Friday. The recruiter said I'd probably have to wait until July-August to go to basic, at the earliest.

Of course, my ship date is April 13th. ;) I'm glad it is soon, but I was hoping for something in Mid/Late May so I had more time to prepare.

I've been running like crazy this past week. Any tips on pushing that distance farther and farther? I've ran 2 mile runs the past two days... I'd like to get up to a 5 mile run before I ship, but I'm not sure I can do it.

Current times: 7 min mile / 16 min 2 mile

Not that great, but not terrible.

KoryMac5
04-01-2010, 09:22 PM
Some folks like doing interval training on a track to increase endurance others like to build a long run (150% of your regular run) into their normal running routine. I would try either of these training techniques to help improve your endurance.

In basic you will be running all the time so you will get your endurance up pretty fast. I went from not being able to run 2 miles to being able to run 5 in a matter of weeks. Good luck with your training and welcome to the Army.

Redsfan320
04-01-2010, 09:53 PM
Thank you, and good luck! :) :thumbup: :thumbup: :usa:

320

RBA
04-01-2010, 10:34 PM
I finally went to MEPS and enlisted with the Army National Guard this past Friday. The recruiter said I'd probably have to wait until July-August to go to basic, at the earliest.

Of course, my ship date is April 13th. ;) I'm glad it is soon, but I was hoping for something in Mid/Late May so I had more time to prepare.

I've been running like crazy this past week. Any tips on pushing that distance farther and farther? I've ran 2 mile runs the past two days... I'd like to get up to a 5 mile run before I ship, but I'm not sure I can do it.

Current times: 7 min mile / 16 min 2 mile

Not that great, but not terrible.

Not bad, I can do that, but I'm 46. ;)

Redsfaithful
04-02-2010, 03:46 AM
If you can run a seven minute mile you're fit enough to run five. Just go out and do it, if you have to take a walking break it's not the end of the world (for now I guess, might be different in two weeks).

Good luck!

SunDeck
04-02-2010, 07:17 AM
Just keep running, your times will improve and your distances will get longer. In basic, you'll probably encounter guys who are ahead of you and behind you, fitness wise. Just keep moving forward and your body will respond.

919191
04-02-2010, 08:52 AM
Once a week do high intensity interval training. Set your watch to go off, at sayy, 45 second intervals. Warm up and then start the timer. Let it cycle thru twice, for 90 seconds at a pace a little less than full blast. Jog easy, or walk the next 45. When it beeps, hit it hard for 2 intervals, and continue this pattern. You won't need to do too many of these. Try whatever times you want, just make sure the fast times are double the slow recovery periods.

Don't run the nest day. Do this once a week. Have one slow long run a week. A pace of 8:00 a mile is plenty fast for this. Even slower is OK. The rest of your runs just do whatever.

This summer I was up to 4 minutes hard/ 2 minutes slow. Thought I was gonna die. 49 is too old for that!

Razor Shines
04-02-2010, 09:22 AM
Once a week do high intensity interval training. Set your watch to go off, at sayy, 45 second intervals. Warm up and then start the timer. Let it cycle thru twice, for 90 seconds at a pace a little less than full blast. Jog easy, or walk the next 45. When it beeps, hit it hard for 2 intervals, and continue this pattern. You won't need to do too many of these. Try whatever times you want, just make sure the fast times are double the slow recovery periods.

Don't run the nest day. Do this once a week. Have one slow long run a week. A pace of 8:00 a mile is plenty fast for this. Even slower is OK. The rest of your runs just do whatever.

This summer I was up to 4 minutes hard/ 2 minutes slow. Thought I was gonna die. 49 is too old for that!

Yes, this. There will be plenty of interval training in basic.

bucksfan2
04-02-2010, 10:11 AM
I finally went to MEPS and enlisted with the Army National Guard this past Friday. The recruiter said I'd probably have to wait until July-August to go to basic, at the earliest.

Of course, my ship date is April 13th. ;) I'm glad it is soon, but I was hoping for something in Mid/Late May so I had more time to prepare.

I've been running like crazy this past week. Any tips on pushing that distance farther and farther? I've ran 2 mile runs the past two days... I'd like to get up to a 5 mile run before I ship, but I'm not sure I can do it.

Current times: 7 min mile / 16 min 2 mile

Not that great, but not terrible.

Couple of things here.

Run and keep running. But don't be afraid to take days off. When I have trained for a marathon you run every other day with a long run on the weekends. You basically use a base of 3 miles on Monday 5 miles on Wed 3 miles Friday. You are supposed to push it when you run your shorter distance. So if I were you I would start a 2-3-2 and work my way up. The shorter distances you run the more frequent you can do them.

Another thing, if you lose weight, it can help you time out considerably. Also use some form of cross-training the days you don't run. If you like to bike or use an elliptical at the gym or any type of exercises that gets your heart rate up will improve your cardio.

919191
04-02-2010, 05:17 PM
Bucksfan is right about days off. I trained for and ran a marathon 13 years ago. I overtrained. I didn't realize it then, but I did. i developed knee problems that I still have. Keep a record of what you run just so you know where you stand.



Couple of things here.

Run and keep running. But don't be afraid to take days off. When I have trained for a marathon you run every other day with a long run on the weekends. You basically use a base of 3 miles on Monday 5 miles on Wed 3 miles Friday. You are supposed to push it when you run your shorter distance. So if I were you I would start a 2-3-2 and work my way up. The shorter distances you run the more frequent you can do them.

Another thing, if you lose weight, it can help you time out considerably. Also use some form of cross-training the days you don't run. If you like to bike or use an elliptical at the gym or any type of exercises that gets your heart rate up will improve your cardio.

Kingspoint
04-03-2010, 01:12 AM
Good Luck. You don't want to be in Basic in August, anyway.

Patience, consistency, and mental toughness. The physical part takes care of itself. Internal prayer helps a lot.

As far as preparing physically.....do pushups and situps every day, at least 100 of each.

:thumbup:

Yachtzee
04-03-2010, 05:39 PM
I thought this thread was going to be about the programming language. I remember having the Basic Programming Language cartridge for my old Atari 2600.

KronoRed
04-03-2010, 06:28 PM
I thought this thread was going to be about the programming language. I remember having the Basic Programming Language cartridge for my old Atari 2600.

20 goto 10

Reds Nd2
04-04-2010, 02:55 AM
I've been running like crazy this past week...

I'd keep running like crazy from the recruiters. bucksfan2 said it best, "Run and keep running".

I'm calling April Fool's on this.

Kingspoint
04-04-2010, 03:49 AM
20 goto 10

I almost got an instant headache when I read that. I was all of a sudden transported back to 1984.

Razor Shines
04-04-2010, 04:45 AM
I'd keep running like crazy from the recruiters. bucksfan2 said it best, "Run and keep running".

I'm calling April Fool's on this.

Really? Creating a thread about joining the National Guard is a good April Fool's joke? I guess you could be right, but lots of people join the National Guard, I'd expect something more creative.

TeamSelig
04-04-2010, 08:53 AM
Nope, I've signed my life away.

Military wasn't my first choice. I'm a month away from being a complete year out of college without landing a job. I will get much needed experience and discipline in my life.

Reds Nd2
04-04-2010, 10:15 AM
Really? Creating a thread about joining the National Guard is a good April Fool's joke? I guess you could be right, but lots of people join the National Guard, I'd expect something more creative.

I just saw the date the thread was posted and thought it might be. It could be because I didn't see or hear any good April Fool's jokes this year. Even the local radio station, who always have a good one, didn't do anything this year.

JaxRed
04-04-2010, 04:00 PM
Curious if you are looking for full time employment why you went guard rather than active?

Kingspoint
04-04-2010, 04:21 PM
Nope, I've signed my life away.

Military wasn't my first choice. I'm a month away from being a complete year out of college without landing a job. I will get much needed experience and discipline in my life.

About 92% of those who join the military do so because they have nothing better to do. Those 8% that join for a particular reason (the MOS they pick goes in line with the career they're interested in, etc.) have an easy time while there. The 92% have a more difficult time at first and their adjustments vary from all ends of the spectrum. If you're of those 8%, then you'll surely have a great time and have no problem whatsoever. If you're of those 92%, then I'd suggest concentrating on coming up with a justified reason (other than "it will give me discipline) for being in the particular MOS (field of work) that you've chosen. Try to change the MOS when you can if you're not able to come up with a justified reason why it will improve your career. And, at all times, be patient, consistent, and mentally tough, and stay away from the dumbasses.

Kingspoint
04-04-2010, 04:24 PM
Curious if you are looking for full time employment why you went guard rather than active?


If he likes it, he can switch to Active while going through his Basic and AIT (about 6 months). He can't switch the other way around. The National Guard, though less these days because of the years of Active Duty he's going to have to do any way, would normally give him an option to pursue his desired career field as a civilian.

Everyone (at least men) should serve in the Military once in their life. Until you've done it, you can't understand what it's about and what it offers one in life lessons. It's just not possible.

TeamSelig
04-04-2010, 05:30 PM
I really don't have an MOS. I do, but it isn't your typical job title. I am going in as an officer candidate (09s) due to my college credits. After basic, I will go to Officer Candidate School. I believe once this is completed, I am assigned a certain field. The back up MOS's were in the Intel field, which goes along with my degree and career field, but it also needs a Top Secret security clearance so it is never guaranteed. I assume that I will have a preference into the Intel officer field, but it really depends where they need me.

BTW Kingpoint, I love your statistics. Good stuff lol.

Jax,

The main reason I joined the Guard, as opposed to active duty Army is because I am missing a few classes to my Bachelor's degree and due to financial issues (along with just not wanting to go that route right now) I really don't want to finish my degree right now.... and in the guard I can become an officer without a full BS degree.

As far as the full time/part time goes, with all of the training I will have to do (Basic 9 weeks, OCS 8 weeks, and then BOLC-B which depends on the job), I won't have to worry about full time pay for another year. The military experience and training should help me land a job easier. If anything, the drill pay + even a part time, minimum wage job will allow the ends to meet... especially once I am commissioned.

It also gives my family a nice health care plan that is affordable. My wife and I haven't had insurance in 2-3 years.

Oh also... there are some full time jobs available. I'd say they are hard to get, but hopefully it is an option I will be able to take.

Kingspoint
04-04-2010, 10:55 PM
I'd say they are hard to get, but hopefully it is an option I will be able to take.

It's always prudent to give yourself more options in life.

Nice going for you and your family. I wish your wife well, too, with this decision.

TeamSelig
04-05-2010, 11:30 AM
Thanks.

So what branch did you serve? You mentioned that everyone should try it in their lifetime, so I'm assuming you didn't regret it.

Orodle
04-05-2010, 03:43 PM
Welcome to the Military. I'm currently Army Light Infantry.
I also have a Bachelor's in Physical Education.

My advice for preparing for basic/2mile run improvement.

Don't work on 5 miles. Work on 2 miles and shorter. Start by running 1 mile at a REALLY fast pace. Then slowly make it 1.2 miles, 1.4, ect keeping the same pace that you started with the 1 mile run.

Running long distances at the begining will break your shins down and one of the most common injuries in the Army/BASIC is shin splints. They aren't going to start you out with a 5 mile run so dont worry about it.

Kingspoint
04-06-2010, 04:38 PM
Thanks.

So what branch did you serve? You mentioned that everyone should try it in their lifetime, so I'm assuming you didn't regret it.

Army. I was in Public Affairs. MOS's were Photojournalism and Broadcast Journalism. But, because it was Public Affairs, I was always involved with all of the branches. My closest friends were mostly Marines.

Kingspoint
04-06-2010, 04:41 PM
Welcome to the Military. I'm currently Army Light Infantry.
I also have a Bachelor's in Physical Education.

My advice for preparing for basic/2mile run improvement.

Don't work on 5 miles. Work on 2 miles and shorter. Start by running 1 mile at a REALLY fast pace. Then slowly make it 1.2 miles, 1.4, ect keeping the same pace that you started with the 1 mile run.

Running long distances at the begining will break your shins down and one of the most common injuries in the Army/BASIC is shin splints. They aren't going to start you out with a 5 mile run so dont worry about it.

Running 2 miles on cement in boots after doing 62 pushups in 2 minutes and 62 situps in 2 minutes is a lot different than running 2 miles in track shoes on a track, too. We had some "state track champions" in Basic, and I smoked them in the military version where I couldn't have come close to them under "track and field" conditions.

Kingspoint
04-06-2010, 04:44 PM
http://www.gruntsmilitary.com/cgi-bin/newsscript.pl?record=5

An Israeli soldier:

http://www.think-israel.org/nov09pix/cc.IDF-female-soldier-offduty.jpg

Orodle
04-06-2010, 09:01 PM
Running 2 miles on cement in boots after doing 62 pushups in 2 minutes and 62 situps in 2 minutes is a lot different than running 2 miles in track shoes on a track, too. We had some "state track champions" in Basic, and I smoked them in the military version where I couldn't have come close to them under "track and field" conditions.

You will rarely run 2 miles with boots on concrete. If you train with boots on concrete your gunna break down. Stick to running shoes. Basic will prepare you for the "battle PT".

Of course I didn't mean to leave out pushup and situps from your daily workout, I was just being specific to where he feels hes weakest.

TeamSelig
04-06-2010, 09:58 PM
I think I will be fine as far as the APFT goes. For my age bracket I just need...

31 p/u
43 s/u
17:30 2 mile

Orodle
04-07-2010, 12:15 AM
Well I guess I can only speak for the infantry world which is the most demanding physically.

But I would not have much respect for an officer (or any leadership position right down to Team Leader) that just meets the minimum PT wise. I can not express how much PT is valued.

Again I can only speak for the Infantry. All MOSs are their own little world.

I would advise you push yourself to improve as much as you can.

Kingspoint
04-07-2010, 01:24 AM
You will rarely run 2 miles with boots on concrete. If you train with boots on concrete your gunna break down. Stick to running shoes. Basic will prepare you for the "battle PT".

Of course I didn't mean to leave out pushup and situps from your daily workout, I was just being specific to where he feels hes weakest.

All of our running was done with boots on concrete. Nobody broke down.

Kingspoint
04-07-2010, 01:26 AM
I think I will be fine as far as the APFT goes. For my age bracket I just need...

31 p/u
43 s/u
17:30 2 mile

Those are some pretty easy numbers. An out of shape person could do those. You could walk a full lap and still reach that 2-mile number, in boots, on cement. I'd be embarrassed if those were my numbers. I would have been near dead last overall. Those 31 p/u's would put you in the bottom 10%, those 43 s/u's would put you in the bottom 30%, and a 17:30 2-mile (in boots on cement) would put you in the bottom 20%......speaking of course of your "end of Basic" test, not the initial one or the middle one.

My 2-mile was 13:12, while I maxed the situps (66, I think it was in 2 minutes) and pushups (62 in 2 minutes), of course. If you just practice every day, it's pretty easy to do so. And, the thing about the 13:12, is that it was one minute better than my mid-Basic time, and my mid-Basic time was one minute better than my beginning-Basic time. The whole time, you're exercising, eating right, and getting in shape. You can't help but improve if you want to. Being 21 years old was a benefit as about 75% of them were 18, 19, or 20. There's an advantage to being older, even that small amount. Maturity helps. You're not there to "get by" and you don't "dog" things.

That's the biggest thing you've got going for you, TeamSelig, as I assume you're not 18-20. It's going to make all the difference in the world.

Those "max" numbers were from October of 1980, the first month they began using pushups and situps. When I entered in September, our first test was pull-ups, and obstacle course, and the 2-minute mile. The "max" numbers now are 77+ pushups (still pretty easy as I had my 62 finished in about 65 seconds (I was actually doing 63 through 67 when they were telling me to, "Stop. Stop. Stop.", as I was doing them in 10 push-up bursts after the first 30. I found that to be easier. I struggled with the situps as it took about 1:40 to do the "max" number of 66. The "max" number now is 82+. But, if that had been the number then, I would have practiced even more than I did. My 2-mile of 13:12 now falls 12 seconds short of the current "max" number of 13:00 or less, but out of 10 Companies of a total of 660 soldiers, there was only one time that beat my 13:12, and that person got a 13:02. Maybe nowdays, they don't use boots and do it on cement, accounting for the difference in the time.

This guy gives some tips on training for the tests. What he suggests on the pushups is exactly how I did them, so I'd agree with him on that.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/14245/how_to_max_the_us_army_physical_fitness_pg2.html?c at=5

Remember that the test is only for 2 minutes so you want to really work on that explosive power. Practice doing sets of pushups as fast as possible and keep going until failure. Try to learn how to focus or stimulate your adrenaline which will help increase the explosive power you'll need to pound out so many reps in a short time. One way to do this is to get angry or think of a scenario were your life would depend on you doing that many pushups. Exhale on your "up" push and inhale on your way down. For some soldiers it helps to actually make the exhale intense and audible.

I would definitely psyche myself up. I'd do the first 30 without stopping. I'd give myself then a 2-3 second rest in the up position, while re-psyching myself up for a "burst" of 10, and then repeat that process without worrying or even thinking at all about what my total number was. They're doing the counting. All I had to think about was the burst of 10. 10 emphasized breaths would be 10 push-ups. Then 3 quick short breaths in the up position and repeat. I did sell myself short by not practicing the sit-ups as much as I should have. As I said, it's not about the final score, but it's about giving a full effort, and I didn't on that. I also didn't on the final 2-mile, as I actually stopped twice and walked for 50 yards. Someone was counting my laps for me, and told me I had just finished my 4th lap, while I actually had finished my 5th, so thinking that I still had to run 100% more than what I had already ran, I measured how much I thought I had left in me. If I'd known that I only had to run 60% of what I'd already had run, then I wouldn't have made the two stops of 50 yards each at the end of the 6th lap and 7th lap (thinking they were the 5th and 6th laps, as I was trying to catch my breath for the final 2 laps where I wouldn't stop at all, and then go all out...it's about pace and trying to understand where you are, what you've got left in you, and how much more you need to run...being told the wrong number really screwed me), and my time would have been between 12:20-12:30. So, I still feel bad to this day about that where I didn't give my full effort on that, regardless of who was counting, my laps. But, there's no way I could have "doubled" what I had already done and ran 10 laps at that pace I was going. Remember, you do the max push-ups, then immediately go to the next test and do the max sit-ups, and then immediately go to the next test and to the 2-mile run. In the end, I still won the "cumulative" award for the most physically fit soldier among the 660 men, as I maxed the mid-test and the final test, while getting about 87% on the beginning test. Guess no one else had more than the 287% at that time from those 10 companies (infantry, tanks, clerks and jerks, the whole range of companies).

Also, it makes a difference what season it is and where your Basic is at. I got lucky and mine were at Louisville from the beginning of September to the end of October, so I didn't have too much hot weather and I didn't have too much cold weather. I feel bad for anyone who has to go through the hot weather, like our troops that have been deployed in Asia and the Middle East, especially, the Middle East. I can't imagine.

Kingspoint
04-07-2010, 01:27 AM
I would advise you push yourself to improve as much as you can.

Hear! Hear!

It's not about where you finish, but about the effort you put in.

919191
04-07-2010, 02:24 AM
The brother of a friend of mine is an ex-Marine Desert Storm era. He served 6 years, I think. After he was out, when I met him, he ran alot. He still wore combat boots.

I always thought he was a little crazy.

Kingspoint
04-07-2010, 07:10 AM
This article explains why the "max" numbers have increased in pushups and situps since they were instilled during September of 1980.

http://www.ihpra.org/1946%20(World%20War%20II)%20Army%20Physical%20Fitn ess%20Test.htm

TeamSelig
04-07-2010, 11:10 AM
Well I guess I can only speak for the infantry world which is the most demanding physically.

But I would not have much respect for an officer (or any leadership position right down to Team Leader) that just meets the minimum PT wise. I can not express how much PT is valued.

Again I can only speak for the Infantry. All MOSs are their own little world.

I would advise you push yourself to improve as much as you can.

Well, when you don't use your brain, PT is all you have ;)

I'm not sure if you are specifically referring to me or not due to my message. What I mean is that I'm terrified about making it physically, but after seeing the tests, I know I can pass. Not that I'm just going to barely pass.

As for the cement thing, from what I've gathered you do your runs on a track now.

Kingspoint
04-07-2010, 06:17 PM
Well, when you don't use your brain, PT is all you have ;)

I'm not sure if you are specifically referring to me or not due to my message. What I mean is that I'm terrified about making it physically, but after seeing the tests, I know I can pass. Not that I'm just going to barely pass.

As for the cement thing, from what I've gathered you do your runs on a track now.

FYI, in no way was he referring to you.

Heavens, no.

Kingspoint
04-07-2010, 06:19 PM
As for the cement thing, from what I've gathered you do your runs on a track now.

I was wondering about that. That should make it even easier to get good times, then.

That really simulates well that "track" they're going to have under real conditions.

RBA
04-08-2010, 12:23 AM
If you end up at Fort Bliss, the "track" is generous description for some of the surfaces you will run on. There is one decent track, however it's overcrowded during PT mornings. I done my Air Force fitness test runs on some of the worst surfaces to run on there.

Orodle
04-08-2010, 08:42 PM
Ya I wasnt referring to you as not having respect for an officer that cant PT. Just putting that out there in the situation I'm in.

As for Infantry not having a brain..... I have a Bachelor's Degree and scored in the 99% on the ASVAB. I qualified for any job in the military I wanted. I could have went to OCS and became an officer. Entering a building deciding on friendly/enemy targets, you cant hear anything because of yelling, gun fire, explosions, and then deciding whether or not to kill a human being does involve processing a lot of information at once.

TeamSelig
04-09-2010, 05:03 PM
I was just joking since infantry is where they stick a lot of the dumber guys... but if you have a degree and great ASVAB score and still chose infantry, maybe you proved my point? ;)

Razor Shines
04-09-2010, 05:24 PM
I was just joking since infantry is where they stick a lot of the dumber guys... but if you have a degree and great ASVAB score and still chose infantry, maybe you proved my point? ;)

Boy, that attitude will certainly endear you to those under your command. Lucky them.

RBA
04-09-2010, 05:28 PM
Respect is earned.

Kingspoint
04-09-2010, 05:52 PM
Respect is earned.

Absolutely.

TeamSelig
04-11-2010, 11:47 AM
Maybe if I was being serious.

Anyways... I leave tomorrow morning. Woke up with a cold today. Awesome.

Kingspoint
04-12-2010, 12:54 AM
Best of luck, man.

Hope all goes well.

You're going at a good time of the year. It's not too cold and it won't be too hot for most of the time that you're there.