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traderumor
04-03-2010, 01:24 PM
I want to honor a great Reds fan with this, my father, who died February 13, 2010.

Opening Day is special in my life because of my dad's love for the Reds. He started following the Reds religiously around 1970. I cannot say for certain because I was only five and my first memories of the Reds are the 1972 NLCS Game 5 call "here comes Foster, the Reds win the pennant," Johnny Bench being tricked into a strikeout on a fake intentional walk, and Joe Rudi making that catch against the wall.

The next year, I started Little League and dad started a tradition in our house. My sister and I could come home from school at lunch and take the rest of the day off for Opening Day. So, I got to see Hank Aaron hit #714 in 1974, the extra inning Dodgers game in 1975, and many more. Of course, that was even a bigger deal since it was the Big Red Machine, which I comprehended.

That "tradition" only lasted a few years. As I went through the Jr. High years, I would still come home for Opening Day if I could, but it didn't always work out. Then in high school, we dropped the tradition altogether. But, emblazoned on my memory is going to the drug store to pick up some baseball cards on a cold April day, then going home and watching Opening Day on channel 4.

But then, when I was in college, I got opening day tickets two years in a row. The first year, my cousin and I went on the same day his stinkin' Michigan Wolverines beat Seton Hall for the NCAA basketball championship. But the next year, I decided I wanted my dad and I to share at least one opening day, so I got tickets again, sat in the Red seats on the first base side, and saw the debut of a rookie named Chris Sabo against the Cardinals, (http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/CIN/CIN198804040.shtml), while the great Davey Concepcion played second base.

Dad died never getting to see Great American Ballpark. He wanted to go, but his health was never good enough for him to make it. But he loved the Reds. One of the harder things to do in his last days, when it was clear that he was going to die anytime, was to avoid talking about the Reds upcoming season that I knew we would not share for the first time.

And here it is, the first Opening Day without the man who introduced me to the wonder of this game through the Cincinnati Reds. I am missing him very much today.

Thanks for reading and taking part in a little bit of my therapy :(

VR
04-03-2010, 01:44 PM
Nicely done TR. Sorry to hear of your loss, your father would be very proud to read this.

Redsfan320
04-03-2010, 02:09 PM
Sorry about the loss. Hang in there. Celebrate OD with other family, it may help. :)

320

RANDY IN INDY
04-03-2010, 02:24 PM
Great post, traderumor. My Dad passed away several years ago. I can remember watching Opening Day with him on so many spring afternoons and had the chance to go to a couple with him in the late 70's and early 80's. I can still hear the radio in the evenings coming out of his shop where he tinkered nearly every spring and summer evening, always tuned to the Reds and Marty and Joe. Always tough to lose your father but remember this: "Don't be sad that it's over. Be glad that it happened."

OnBaseMachine
04-03-2010, 02:33 PM
Great post, TR. Sorry to hear about your dad.

traderumor
04-03-2010, 02:48 PM
Great post, traderumor. My Dad passed away several years ago. I can remember watching Opening Day with him on so many spring afternoons and had the chance to go to a couple with him in the late 70's and early 80's. I can still hear the radio in the evenings coming out of his shop where he tinkered nearly every spring and summer evening, always tuned to the Reds and Marty and Joe. Always tough to lose your father but remember this: "Don't be sad that it's over. Be glad that it happened."Randy, great last line. Thanks to all who have commented. I had the great privilege and blessing of a dad who was involved in my life, we shared many interests, coached my baseball and basketball teams, we never, and I seriously mean never, fought, and died married to my mom for 50 years. I know that I have received in that part of my life much more than I ever deserved.

Tommyjohn25
04-03-2010, 03:21 PM
Well said Traderumor. I'm fortunate enough to still have my Father around, and like you, he raised me on Reds baseball. I am dreading the day I can't call him after every win.

Hang in there buddy. Best wishes.

redsmetz
04-03-2010, 06:39 PM
Traderumor, so sorry to hear about your dad. The last time the Reds played the Cards on Opening Day, we went with my family and my wife's family came in from out of town. My buddy and his father went with us too and we got a nice photo of him and his dad sitting at the game. Later that summer, his dad died suddenly and he's always cherished that picture we gave him of the two of them at the game.

Enjoy the game on Monday and think of your dad. Those will always be great memories. Peace.

reds1869
04-03-2010, 06:57 PM
Beautiful post. I shared a similar bond with my grandpa. My thoughts are with you.

Ron Madden
04-03-2010, 07:01 PM
Always remember and be thankful for those quality moments spent with your Father TR. :thumbup:

Falls City Beer
04-03-2010, 11:18 PM
I lost my father 12 years ago to the day today. He'll always be there, TR.

Benihana
04-04-2010, 01:04 AM
All the best TR

WVRedsFan
04-04-2010, 02:00 AM
I want to honor a great Reds fan with this, my father, who died February 13, 2010.

Opening Day is special in my life because of my dad's love for the Reds. He started following the Reds religiously around 1970. I cannot say for certain because I was only five and my first memories of the Reds are the 1972 NLCS Game 5 call "here comes Foster, the Reds win the pennant," Johnny Bench being tricked into a strikeout on a fake intentional walk, and Joe Rudi making that catch against the wall.

The next year, I started Little League and dad started a tradition in our house. My sister and I could come home from school at lunch and take the rest of the day off for Opening Day. So, I got to see Hank Aaron hit #714 in 1974, the extra inning Dodgers game in 1975, and many more. Of course, that was even a bigger deal since it was the Big Red Machine, which I comprehended.

That "tradition" only lasted a few years. As I went through the Jr. High years, I would still come home for Opening Day if I could, but it didn't always work out. Then in high school, we dropped the tradition altogether. But, emblazoned on my memory is going to the drug store to pick up some baseball cards on a cold April day, then going home and watching Opening Day on channel 4.

But then, when I was in college, I got opening day tickets two years in a row. The first year, my cousin and I went on the same day his stinkin' Michigan Wolverines beat Seton Hall for the NCAA basketball championship. But the next year, I decided I wanted my dad and I to share at least one opening day, so I got tickets again, sat in the Red seats on the first base side, and saw the debut of a rookie named Chris Sabo against the Cardinals, (http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/CIN/CIN198804040.shtml), while the great Davey Concepcion played second base.

Dad died never getting to see Great American Ballpark. He wanted to go, but his health was never good enough for him to make it. But he loved the Reds. One of the harder things to do in his last days, when it was clear that he was going to die anytime, was to avoid talking about the Reds upcoming season that I knew we would not share for the first time.

And here it is, the first Opening Day without the man who introduced me to the wonder of this game through the Cincinnati Reds. I am missing him very much today.

Thanks for reading and taking part in a little bit of my therapy :(

Similar experience to mine. We were so far away, but saw so many games and we never did make it to Opening Day. My only Opening Day came in 1971. Dad couldn't go because the big wigs from the railroad were coming in that day. I had a big test on that day in a class, but my teacher, also a Reds fan, let me make it up. It was cold and we were up in nosebleed seats at Riverfront. Nothing like it and I would do it again, but work gets in the way. Maybe some day, but without Dad. Again. I feel your pain and have for 29 years. But I wouldn't give anything for the times we had together!

Redsfaithful
04-04-2010, 02:37 AM
I had the great privilege and blessing of a dad who was involved in my life, we shared many interests, coached my baseball and basketball teams, we never, and I seriously mean never, fought, and died married to my mom for 50 years. I know that I have received in that part of my life much more than I ever deserved.

He sounds like he was a great man. I'm sorry for your loss.

Mario-Rijo
04-04-2010, 06:46 AM
Beautiful post. I shared a similar bond with my grandpa. My thoughts are with you.

Same here and that bond lives on thru Reds baseball. And I always remember Nuxies closing line at times like this, these great Reds fans have rounded 3rd and are now safely at home listening to that great Reds broadcast in the sky done by Joe. And we will have a talk when I get there about the current Reds and how Tommy Lasorda still won't shut up and again get to listen together. Keep your head up TR!

RED VAN HOT
04-04-2010, 07:40 AM
Very beautifully written. I am sorry for your loss. I suspect that you will always share opening day with your dad as the flood of wonderful memories return.

I lost my father over 20 years ago. Occasionally, I reflect on the stories he told of playing baseball in his youth during the depression. The energy that flowed with those stories told me that it was the happiest time of his life. I like to believe that there will come a time when my father, my sons, and I are reunited on a baseball field. We'll start playing before the dew has lifted from the grass and continue until the darkness forces a halt.

traderumor
04-04-2010, 08:40 AM
Thanks again to all who have replied and shared their stories. One of the great things that dad left behind for me was peace in our relationship. We had loved each other very well. I told my children not so long ago, who are in a state of constant bickering and picking at each other's faults, to be careful, because when someone is not around any more, you don't really care about those things that drove you crazy about that person. All you want is for them to be around to see and to love just one more time.

That little nugget of wisdom didn't have much effect, but it sure did sound good ;)

Joseph
04-04-2010, 10:30 AM
One of the stories I remember my dad telling me as a kid when I started to develop an interest in baseball was the one you mentioned about Bench striking out on an intentional walk. I suppose its fitting that you use it in a story remembering your father since we are in a similar boat. My dad instilled my love of baseball in me when I was a kid too. He's been gone now 11 years. We never went to an opening day together, or even a regular season game for that matter, but everytime I go to a game to this day I think of my dad. We always talked about going, and I'd always planned to take him once I was old enough and had a 'real' job. Unfortunately he passed away while I was still in college and to this day I am remiss in the fact I was more interested in using that money on beer than finding a couple tickets to a ballgame.

Like others have said, enjoy the memories most of all and try to create the same memories with your kids now. Thats the best way to honor your dads legacy.

dfs
04-04-2010, 01:33 PM
Opening Day is special in my life because of my dad's love for the Reds. He started following the Reds religiously around 1970. I cannot say for certain because I was only five and my first memories of the Reds are the 1972 NLCS Game 5 call "here comes Foster, the Reds win the pennant," Johnny Bench being tricked into a strikeout on a fake intentional walk, and Joe Rudi making that catch against the wall.


Gene Tenace? Who the.... was Gene Tenace?

Nice post btw.

Reds1
04-04-2010, 06:02 PM
I can appreciate this TR as I'm going to my 12th opening day in a row and my dad has went to 11 of them with me. We will be there - just the two of us tomorrow. It's probably the only thing we do religiously together. My dad is a Dodgers fan, but I think he has come to appreciate the small market team Reds and I have taught him about the Redlegs. I know one day my dad will be gone and I can already tell you that him not being there opening days will come and go and be a bitter sweet day for me. I will enjoy them while I can, but appreciate your thread and tribute.
Thanks

reds44
04-04-2010, 10:48 PM
Awesome post, I got chills reading it. I'm sorry for your loss.

cumberlandreds
04-05-2010, 09:08 AM
A very fine post TradeRumor. My dad passed away 5 years ago this Novemeber. As time passes you will remember the good times you had with your more and more. The pain slowly fades as you reflect on all those great memories of him. My dad instilled my Reds fanhood. He found the radio station in my local area to listen to the Reds and encouraged me to keep up with them. That all started in 1971 and has continued for me until this day. He would always talk about that Johnny Bench strikeout in the World Series too. He would laugh about the look Bench gave when the pitch went by him for a strike. I will always remember his reaction too when Bench hit that HR to tie game 5 of the 72 playoffs. He was usually unfazed when someting dramatic happened in a game. But this one time he jumped up and clapped his hands and said "How about that!" We went to quite a few Reds games together and I wouldn't trade those time for anything. It sounded like you had a great father and I'm sure you will cherish all those times you had together forever too.