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View Full Version : Have you ever taken a counteroffer from your employer?



edabbs44
04-24-2010, 01:28 PM
Kind of a spin-off from the "turning down a higher paying job" thread...does anyone have feelings one way or the other regarding taking a counteroffer after resigning? I'm currently going through that now and I know that, historically, it was taboo to take a counter. But I think that times are different now. Also, I took one counter in the past and it was the best decision I ever made in my life.

Any thoughts?

oneupper
04-24-2010, 02:11 PM
This kind of thing boils down to what people are going to think about you afterwards.
So think about how much you actually care about that (or not) and do what you think is best for you.
People will grumble and mumble and say its unprofessional, but in a year or two nobody remembers anything. Life in businessville goes on.

Yachtzee
04-24-2010, 05:25 PM
I know people who have taken the counteroffer. I've also seen people leave one job for a better one with another company and end up going back to the old employer for and even better offer a few years later. If your employer views you as a valuable asset to the company, I think it's a good thing. On the other hand, if your employer is just making a counter to prevent you from going to a competitor, then maybe it's not so great. I think you need to think about the motives behind the counter.

Reds4Life
04-24-2010, 05:35 PM
I read somewhere that most people who accept a counter offer usually end up leaving the company within 6 months.

The problem will be your boss and others knew you were ready to leave, and it will be stuck in the back of thier minds that you might do it again.

15fan
04-24-2010, 05:49 PM
Our M.O. is to wish the person well and get to work on finding his/her replacement.

reds1869
04-24-2010, 08:32 PM
I read somewhere that most people who accept a counter offer usually end up leaving the company within 6 months.

The problem will be your boss and others knew you were ready to leave, and it will be stuck in the back of thier minds that you might do it again.

My sister took a counter and ended up leaving for a better job within a few months. So she definitely proves that theory, though she is a in a hyper competitive field so her case might not prove anything.

IslandRed
04-25-2010, 06:38 PM
If you take the counter, the other company -- the one you told, yes, I'm coming, and then, oops, never mind -- is going to feel burned. Whether or not that has the potential to come back and bite you depends on the industry/locale, I guess.

Roy Tucker
04-26-2010, 10:44 AM
I think once you've made the decision to leave a company, its a semi-permeable membrane.

You can go out of the company, but you'll never really come back in again. You may take the counter but you are already gone in your mind and its a matter of time before you leave again.

FWIW, I've done both.

SunDeck
04-26-2010, 11:10 AM
I think once you've made the decision to leave a company, its a semi-permeable membrane.

You can go out of the company, but you'll never really come back in again. You may take the counter but you are already gone in your mind and its a matter of time before you leave again.

FWIW, I've done both.

I took a counter once, and Roy's description pretty much fit my situation. In my line of work, just about the only way to make more money is to go elsewhere into a position of more responsibility. Counters are very infrequent, and we were pretty surprised that they did it.
But it didn't hold off the inevitable. I went elsewhere about two years later.

edabbs44
04-26-2010, 11:24 AM
The only counter I ever took was in October 2000, and I was headed to the 101 floor of the WTC. Just a really weird experience to say the least.

TRF
04-26-2010, 03:27 PM
At the college I work at, it's commonplace to retire, then come back in 45 days. You get your retirement benefits, work PT, keep your insurance and you no longer pay into the retirement programs so in essence your paycheck is larger. The college gets the benefit of a non benefits (except for insurance) employee that they don't have to train.

win-win.

Ltlabner
04-26-2010, 04:15 PM
As some have pointed out there's all sort of variables that could make it a smart move to take the counter offer.

In general, don't take it. They've been screwing you all along at a lower salary and are only ponying up because of threat of you leaving. If you were that valuable they'd had made sure you'd didn't seriously entertain any other possibilities in the first place.

edabbs44
04-26-2010, 11:14 PM
As some have pointed out there's all sort of variables that could make it a smart move to take the counter offer.

In general, don't take it. They've been screwing you all along at a lower salary and are only ponying up because of threat of you leaving. If you were that valuable they'd had made sure you'd didn't seriously entertain any other possibilities in the first place.

I tend to agree with you, but I am expecting a fairly significant counter with guaranteed money. That kind of changes the game for me.

Roy Tucker
04-29-2010, 04:50 PM
From a recruiter....

http://partner-technology.com/counteroffers

Reds4Life
04-30-2010, 10:42 PM
From a recruiter....

http://partner-technology.com/counteroffers

I will say upfront, I think recruiters are scum.

Think of it from their prospective, of course they wouldn't want you to take a counter. Why? They wouldn't get paid. Recruiters get a % of your first year salary as a fee, paid by the employer you are placed with. If you agree to the job, then back out and take a counteroffer, they get nothing. They don't care if taking the counter is really better for you or not, they care about making money off you.

I've been on both sides of the table with recruiters, as a candidate and a hiring manager. When their lips are moving, they are lying. Most of them are lucky if they last a year, I've never seen an industry with such high turnover. There is no chance in you know what I'd ever use a recruiting service to find a job, or fill one. Nor would I take any advice from the self proclaimed "experts".

Rant over. :)

edabbs44
04-30-2010, 10:54 PM
I will say upfront, I think recruiters are scum.

Think of it from their prospective, of course they wouldn't want you to take a counter. Why? They wouldn't get paid. Recruiters get a % of your first year salary as a fee, paid by the employer you are placed with. If you agree to the job, then back out and take a counteroffer, they get nothing. They don't care if taking the counter is really better for you or not, they care about making money off you.

I've been on both sides of the table with recruiters, as a candidate and a hiring manager. When their lips are moving, they are lying. Most of them are lucky if they last a year, I've never seen an industry with such high turnover. There is no chance in you know what I'd ever use a recruiting service to find a job, or fill one. Nor would I take any advice from the self proclaimed "experts".

Rant over. :)

Agree with most of this, except for the scum part since my sister and brother-in-law are recruiters. ;)

KittyDuran
05-01-2010, 12:07 AM
Agree with most of this, except for the scum part since my sister and brother-in-law are recruiters. ;)
And I agree with most of this as well, except for the scum part since I work for a recruiting firm. ;)


A recruiter can lose face with a client company, a substantial amount of time and allocated resources and possibly income when a candidate backs out after accepting.


The above quote should read "A recruiter loses face with a client company, a lot of time, allocated resources, and income when a candidate backs out after accepting." In my experience there is no "can" and "possibly" in these situation. It's pretty much doomsday with some clients who will never work with the recruiting firm again.


They don't care if taking the counter is really better for you or not, they care about making money off you.
You got that right! :thumbup: A recruiter and recruiting firms are there to make money doing a job that many times a company or the company's HR department doesn't have time nor whats to do (Reds4Life and the company you work for excluded, or course). Also, those who help said recruiter (like me) have wasted time, recruiting company resources (if a client wants a background checks and drug screens that have already been completed), and notably paperwork as well - I've used more than a few choice words on potential candidates who bow out at the last minute on counter-offers or change of heart.