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jredmo2
05-03-2010, 04:12 PM
At what point did you go from "quitting" to "ex-smoker"? You know, when did you actually realize that you met your goal, and you knew you wouldn't be smoking anymore?

I'm personally about a month in, but it doesn't really *feel* like I've quit (not necessarily in the physical sense though, as health-wise I'm feeling much better). It's still way too day-to-day for me; it's pretty much a daily decision not to smoke.

I feel like at some point I should just stop thinking about or wanting to smoke altogether, like before I started. Does this happen? Or do you have to continually make that "I am NOT going to smoke right now" statement to yourself?

I guess the question is, does the temptation to smoke always stick around, go away somewhat, or go away completely?

westofyou
05-03-2010, 04:13 PM
2 years... and it's been 22 so far and I ain't going back, nor could I

TRF
05-03-2010, 05:33 PM
My wife quit in 2004, started again in 2009 sadly.

Ravenlord
05-03-2010, 05:43 PM
my Dad quit 3 years ago and not a day goes by where he doesn't want one at some point.

my Mom quit 15 years ago and about once every month or so she has the urge.

myself, i go weeks, sometimes months at a time without wanting one, will smoke one, and give the rest of the pack away. then about once or twice a year, i'll smoke 4 or 5 packs in two days or so.

i think the answer is entirely within the individual.

Joseph
05-03-2010, 07:11 PM
It truly is an individual thing unfortunately. There's no magic number.

I smoked for quite a few years as a teen and twenty something. in fact my nickname was 'Smokin Joe'. One day however i was feeling ill and caught a sniff of my hands and I haven't smoked since, and honestly I haven't even WANTED to smoke. So for me I was an 'ex-smoker' pretty quickly.

Oxilon
05-03-2010, 07:22 PM
I heard there are some good books that can help you quit and there's also the new prescription pill that makes you physically ill if you smoke a cigarette.

For me personally though, when I quit (started when I was 17, quit when I was 21) I just went cold turkey. Whenever I thought about wanting a cigarette, I would google (or just think from the last time) a picture of a smoker's set of lungs. Honestly, that image just threw me off smoking all together -- and whenever I thought of smoking, I just kept thinking of the black tar that was sticking to my lungs. Sorry for the detailed description, but honestly, it worked for me so hopefully it helps. ;)

Scrap Irony
05-03-2010, 07:38 PM
Smoked for more than 15 years, then quit cold turkey after having some health problems.

Have wanted a smoke off and on for the two plus years since I quit. (Mostly at really odd intervals.) But it does get easier.

Kingspoint
05-03-2010, 10:51 PM
http://lh3.ggpht.com/_5V7vNjVKdVI/SYL0DjrOUCI/AAAAAAABIKM/q3JeUuYJfvQ/s400/smokerLungHeart.jpg

Screwball
05-03-2010, 11:32 PM
http://lh3.ggpht.com/_5V7vNjVKdVI/SYL0DjrOUCI/AAAAAAABIKM/q3JeUuYJfvQ/s400/smokerLungHeart.jpg

On the plus side, your lungs begin to heal themselves after you quit smoking, which is comforting to know, at least it was for me. I quit about 4 months ago, and I consider myself an ex-smoker now. I was kinda fortunate in that I never really smoked that much when I wasn't drinking (something like 5 smokes a day), but when I was drinking I could easily run through a pack in a night, which made for some serious chain-smoking weekends.

I, like others, just upped and quit cold turkey one day (I couldn't really justify paying $6.00 a pack anymore), and haven't even wanted a cigarette in about 3 months. I think what helped me was recognizing my "triggers" and preparing myself mentally to stay strong. For example, a lot of people want a cigarette when they see other people smoking (either on TV or real life), get in tense or stressful situations, or - like me - when they have a few drinks. Knowing and expecting this helps you prepare for the inevitable cravings that accompany these triggers, and how you will respond to them. I refused to give in (my stubborn nature came in handy for once) and eventually I became so comfortable and used to abstaining from smoking - despite the triggers - that it's become 2nd nature for me.

Oh an by the way, it also really helps to surround yourself with people who also don't smoke. Being around other smokers is extremely difficult when you're trying to quit, especially in the early going (like the OP).

savafan
05-03-2010, 11:43 PM
Can't say for sure, as like you, I'm just a little over a month in myself. I've only had the urge 3-4 times in the last 34 days though.


Oh an by the way, it also really helps to surround yourself with people who also don't smoke. Being around other smokers is extremely difficult when you're trying to quit, especially in the early going (like the OP).

This is excellent advice!

jredmo2
05-04-2010, 12:03 AM
Can't say for sure, as like you, I'm just a little over a month in myself. I've only had the urge 3-4 times in the last 34 days though.



This is excellent advice!

Yeah it's tough hanging around my smoker friends. Ahhh, well. I guess the thing is, it was causing me so much anxiety, knowing what it was doing to my health, the grave consequences etc. Really that anxiety was almost as crippling as an actual physical ailment. That's what I keep going back to, that there is no way smoking is worth that kind of panic. That's why I think when you're drinking, it's much easier to slip-up, because all of those morbid thoughts don't really come up with all the fun you're having :beerme: But, then there is the hangover... ohh the hangover. Actually that's one of the benefits I've seen from quitting smoking, hangovers are nowhere naear as painful now.

Ravenlord
05-04-2010, 01:35 AM
http://lh3.ggpht.com/_5V7vNjVKdVI/SYL0DjrOUCI/AAAAAAABIKM/q3JeUuYJfvQ/s400/smokerLungHeart.jpg

mathematically, thats a lot more than the pack every two weeks, or so, i smoke. at the same time, i know most people aren't wired like that...it just puts me in the mode that wants to smoke anything availble.

Jack Burton
05-04-2010, 11:40 AM
Time is the only thing that can help, in a couple of months you will be disgusted by the smell. Keep a lot of gum around and chew a peice whenever you get the urge to have a smoke. Also, whoever mentioned it before was right on the money about knowing your triggers. Minimizing your triggers will be a big help in the beginning to help you get adjusted.

Also, not sure how the gov't can condone these things to still be sold legally. I guess as long as they get their cut they don't care how many people die, population control in a way and everyone gets paid in the process.

savafan
05-04-2010, 12:11 PM
Let me add that gum didn't help me... but lollipops did. Solved the oral fixation while driving problem too.

BRM
05-04-2010, 12:12 PM
I quit 14 years ago. Took me about a year to feel like I made it. Have zero desire to smoke now. Dipping is another story entirely. I quit about 6 years ago but still have strong urges to do it again, all the time. It's been tough.

TRF
05-04-2010, 02:26 PM
I've never smoked. Everyone in my family does or did except me. I have asthma and breathing clean air was hard enough. I've never even taken a puff.

I give up something every year. First it was caffeine and carbonated beverages. That sucked, but it was 5 years ago. Since then I've had maybe 3 sodas. 4 years ago it was McD's and Burger King. I haven't looked back. I add a fast food restaurant every year, and this year I also added candy. I am incrementally trying to get healthier.

And none of that compares to my wife when she quit smoking. she just did cold turkey. She started again when our marriage was falling apart. I never mention it. Always starts a fight.

Sea Ray
05-04-2010, 03:11 PM
Also, not sure how the gov't can condone these things to still be sold legally. I guess as long as they get their cut they don't care how many people die, population control in a way and everyone gets paid in the process.


If someone invented cigs today they probably wouldn't gain gov't approval but at this point they're raising a lot of money and there's the big brother issue too. Count me as one who doesn't think gov't should ban everything that's bad for you and I've been a militant non smoker my whole life

Sea Ray
05-04-2010, 03:14 PM
I've never smoked. Everyone in my family does or did except me. I have asthma and breathing clean air was hard enough. I've never even taken a puff.

I give up something every year. First it was caffeine and carbonated beverages. That sucked, but it was 5 years ago. Since then I've had maybe 3 sodas. 4 years ago it was McD's and Burger King. I haven't looked back. I add a fast food restaurant every year, and this year I also added candy. I am incrementally trying to get healthier.

And none of that compares to my wife when she quit smoking. she just did cold turkey. She started again when our marriage was falling apart. I never mention it. Always starts a fight.


How'd you ever end up marrying a smoker? With your asthma and all that's the last thing you needed. I'm sure you realize your asthma is likely because of all the smoke in your house while you were growing up. My household was smoky too; luckily I didn't come out of it with any breathing issues.

aubashbrother
05-04-2010, 04:27 PM
i smoked for a couple years tried to stop cold turkey but it didnt work so i switched from smoking to dipping and ive recently tried to stop dipping. sunflower seeds and sticking a pepermint in my mouth and just spitting works pretty well lol

TRF
05-04-2010, 05:10 PM
How'd you ever end up marrying a smoker? With your asthma and all that's the last thing you needed. I'm sure you realize your asthma is likely because of all the smoke in your house while you were growing up. My household was smoky too; luckily I didn't come out of it with any breathing issues.

It was tough. but when it really started affecting me she moved outside. The last two years before she quit she only smoked outside, and now that she has started again, same thing. My daughter has asthma too, and probably strep, again. so she's pretty miserable. My wife tries to stay far away from her when she smokes.

OUReds
05-04-2010, 05:18 PM
It took a year to consider myself a non-smoker, a couple years for the occasional cravings to go away. I'm with Sava on the candy, Jolly Ranchers did it for me.

After about 6 years, I do get very slight cravings every great once in a while, but then I remember the smell, and it's not a problem at all.

Jack Burton
05-04-2010, 05:29 PM
If someone invented cigs today they probably wouldn't gain gov't approval but at this point they're raising a lot of money and there's the big brother issue too. Count me as one who doesn't think gov't should ban everything that's bad for you and I've been a militant non smoker my whole life

Right, but considering the addictive nature you would think motions would be made to have this product removed from the market.

jimbo
05-04-2010, 05:37 PM
Right, but considering the addictive nature you would think motions would be made to have this product removed from the market.

That are a lot of things on the market that are bad for you if used, drank, ingested, etc. in excess. All this would do is open up a whole can of worms and it would just be the beginning. Let me make my own decisions.

Jack Burton
05-04-2010, 05:53 PM
That are a lot of things on the market that are bad for you if used, drank, ingested, etc. in excess. All this would do is open up a whole can of worms and it would just be the beginning. Let me make my own decisions.

I agree w/ being able to make your own decisions. It is the OP's decision to stop smoking and now he's screwed because these companies were dumping highly addictive "stuff" in their product. They should be banned but they won't be due to the $. Think of how many billions of dollars would be lost not to mention the increase in population. Big time conspiracy at work here with cig companies, gov't, hospitals, pharm companies, insurance companies etc.

jredmo2
05-04-2010, 05:58 PM
I agree w/ being able to make your own decisions. It is the OP's decision to stop smoking and now he's screwed because these companies were dumping highly addictive "stuff" in their product. They should be banned but they won't be due to the $. Think of how many billions of dollars would be lost not to mention the increase in population. Big time conspiracy at work here with cig companies, gov't, hospitals, pharm companies, insurance companies etc.

But this is faulty, ignoring the obvious fact that the decision to smoke was mine to make in the first place. It's not as if I was ignorant to the risks. But I'm the type who thinks all drugs should be legal, etc. (i.e. a libertarian)

Jack Burton
05-04-2010, 06:40 PM
But this is faulty, ignoring the obvious fact that the decision to smoke was mine to make in the first place. It's not as if I was ignorant to the risks. But I'm the type who thinks all drugs should be legal, etc. (i.e. a libertarian)

Agreed, definitely a poor decision to start. But you would think that since it's sold legally otc that it wouldn't be so difficult to quit.

Yachtzee
05-04-2010, 07:32 PM
Agreed, definitely a poor decision to start. But you would think that since it's sold legally otc that it wouldn't be so difficult to quit.

Chocolate is sold legally and I don't think I could ever quit that.

redsfandan
05-05-2010, 07:32 AM
At what point did you go from "quitting" to "ex-smoker"? You know, when did you actually realize that you met your goal, and you knew you wouldn't be smoking anymore?
January '04 while I was watching an NFL playoff game in a sports bar (I think it was Panthers-Rams). I had quit roughly 6 months before, after almost 20 years of smoking (mostly Winstons), and curiosity got the best of me. So I bummed a smoke off of someone else, took one hit, and then I put it out. That's when I knew.


I guess the question is, does the temptation to smoke always stick around, go away somewhat, or go away completely?
I'm still tempted sometimes. But not often. And not enough to smoke again. When I finally quit smoking for good it wasn't the first time I had tried to quit. It just took me awhile before I was ready. I wish I hadn't started smoking. But I'm glad I quit.

SandyD
05-06-2010, 09:09 PM
My dad quit cold turkey when we were kids. This was back in the 60s, and there were a lot of very scary ads on TV. I begged my dad to quit, but that did no good. What got him? My kid brother (4 maybe?) was picking up cigarette butts from the gutter and putting them into his mouth ... to look like daddy.

Hate to say it, but every now and then, he still says if the doctor told him he had a finite time to live, he thinks he would take up smoking again. Doesn't crave it. Hates to be around it. But, still ...

Good luck. Take it one day at a time.

I've mentioned this before, but a man I used to know shared his doctors advise. Doc said cold turkey is the best. He should take about 3 days off, and get a hotel room ... alone. Bring some white wash clothes, and take a shower, every time he wanted a smoke. The wash cloth turned brownish each time, but his cravings less frequently, and they had virtually stopped by the end of the third day.

savafan
05-07-2010, 07:37 AM
I quit cold turkey, and yeah, the first 3 days were the hardest. I think someone once told me that after 3 days, the body loses its dependence on nicotine.

bounty37h
05-07-2010, 03:31 PM
[QUOTE=TRF;2073244]I've never smoked. Everyone in my family does or did except me. I have asthma and breathing clean air was hard enough. I've never even taken a puff.

I give up something every year. First it was caffeine and carbonated beverages. That sucked, but it was 5 years ago. Since then I've had maybe 3 sodas. 4 years ago it was McD's and Burger King. I haven't looked back. I add a fast food restaurant every year, and this year I also added candy. I am incrementally trying to get healthier.

So, one day you will be dying of absolutely nothing?

1990REDS
05-08-2010, 12:21 PM
I smoked for about 8 years and quit about a year ago. For me i just had to stop all my triggers and and know i dont get cravings anymore. I quit drinking beer. for some reason beer makes me want a cig but liquer doesnt, wierd. I also quit drinking cofee in the morning. But for me i stopped getting cravings at about 6 months and havent had one in about 6 months, But all this cig talk makes me want one;) just kidding.

Sea Ray
05-11-2010, 11:28 AM
You folks don't need to completely give up stuff (other than cigs) like beer, fast food, candy etc. Enjoy it in moderation. Life's short, enjoy it.

Jack Burton
05-11-2010, 11:56 AM
Any of you ex-cigarette smokers enjoy an occasional cigar?

LoganBuck
05-11-2010, 04:30 PM
Any of you ex-cigarette smokers enjoy an occasional cigar?

Yes, but for me, it rekindles the desire to smoke. Had one the night of my sister's wedding last year, and two, two months later on vacation. I enjoy the cigar, but then I have to consciously tell myself "NO" to the idea of buying any other tobacco. The thought lingers for weeks.

Jack Burton
05-12-2010, 06:21 PM
Yes, but for me, it rekindles the desire to smoke. Had one the night of my sister's wedding last year, and two, two months later on vacation. I enjoy the cigar, but then I have to consciously tell myself "NO" to the idea of buying any other tobacco. The thought lingers for weeks.
Thanks. Figured it wouldn't be a good idea, but might be worth it on occasion.

dfs
05-12-2010, 10:45 PM
At what point did you go from "quitting" to "ex-smoker"? You know, when did you actually realize that you met your goal, and you knew you wouldn't be smoking anymore?

I found there was an enormous difference between quitting smoking and not starting again.

That sounds silly. I quit smoking...probably 15 times or so. I went months even years without a smoke proving to myself...yeah, I could quit. Every time I would find a way to have a smoke just to prove to myself I wasn't a smoker anymore. Every time I ended up either at a pack a day or sneaking around smelling like an ashtray.

Finally I decided that I needed to stop "quitting" what I needed to do was realize I could never start again.

It's been 16 years since my last pack. Every now and then I still want a smoke...you know...just to show myself that I'm not really a smoker anymore.

That's probably not what you want to hear, but it's been my experience.

VR
05-12-2010, 11:23 PM
Any of you ex-cigarette smokers enjoy an occasional cigar?

Yes. Don't crave them, but I do enjoy a good one 2-3 times a year.

I quit about 8 years ago...and will occasionally get a waft of smoke that makes me feel like the Marlboro man. Then I remember the cost, health implications, bad breath, overall stink, my kids, and I'm over it in seconds.

TRF
05-13-2010, 12:33 PM
So, one day you will be dying of absolutely nothing?

one day?

like i am not doing that right now.

bengalsown
05-14-2010, 12:33 AM
I am currently on my fifth try quitting, I have quit a few times, and lasted several months, but I always came back. Quitting sucks...

Screwball
05-14-2010, 11:19 AM
I found there was an enormous difference between quitting smoking and not starting again.

That sounds silly. I quit smoking...probably 15 times or so. I went months even years without a smoke proving to myself...yeah, I could quit..

This reminds me of the joke my old college buddy always said: "Quitting smoking is the easiest thing in the world. Hell, I've done it hundreds of times."