PDA

View Full Version : How Does Your Garden Grow?



redsmetz
05-17-2010, 09:41 AM
I thought this would be a good thread. I tilled up the garden plots in our back yard and my wife has been planting the last two weekends. So in this thread, I figured folks could talk about what they're planting this season.

I live in the city, so we don't have a large yard, but we've got a couple of beds behind the house and raised bed we put in last year. Likewise, we have a couple of other small plots by that too. So far, she's put in three tomato plants, about ten broccoli plants, one zucchini, a handful of sweet peppers (she'll pick lots of green peppers and let some ripen to red). She's had some spinach going for a couple of weeks and has found various spots for planting some green beans. Finally we've put in some basil and some cilantro in some planters on our porch railing.

The entire back fence is flowers and a couple of flowering bushes. In this area too, we have three chimney pots from our neighbors house that were taken down when they re-did their chimney. In these we have clay pots with flowers in them for a nice addition to the gardens. We have another small plot next to our neighbors house that has some perennials and annuals. The front yard has the entire front of the house and along our other neighbors fence with various perennials and annuals. Add in a couple of hanging baskets in both the front and the back.

Not bad for a small urban yard.

Redsfan320
05-17-2010, 09:56 AM
Our family typically plants things for homemade salsa (a few kinds of tomatoes, green onion, green bell peppers, habanero peppers), and this year we're also doing watermelon and cantaloupe. In the past we've done strawberries, roma tomatoes, corn, potatoes (brown and red), green beans, and many different varieties of bell pepper. We do several flowers every year, and did sunflowers at least once. We also had rosemary once.

320

Roy Tucker
05-17-2010, 09:59 AM
We've got your typical 'burb yard, about 1/2 acre. Lived here for close to 20 years so we have a lot of flower and garden beds built up.

I have a south-facing bed that I planted about a month ago. For about the last week, we've been eating lots of spinach, romaine, and bib lettuce. I also planted 2 tomatoes and 2 pepper plants and put "walls of water" (http://www.burpee.com/product/vegetables/tomatoes/tomato+helpers/wall+o'+water-+1+pkg.++of++3.do) around them on the same bed. We've got some green tomatoes now that look like they are thinking about turning pink. This south bed is also where I put the composter bin.

Out back, I've got 4 5'x10' beds that we plant typical stuff in. Tomatoes, peppers, squash, beans, peas, etc etc. Just put the plants in on mom's day and have been planting seeds when I've got time.

gonelong
05-17-2010, 10:05 AM
I have a 10'x10' raised bed in the back yard, and a 4'x6' in another spot. We generally have herbs my wife uses to cook with, green beans, carrots, spinach, lettuce, peppers of all sorts, tomatoes, cucumber, potatoes (that I just can't seem to get to produce), zuchinni, pumpkins, and strawberrys. That sounds like a lot for a small gardern, but the peppers and tomatoes dominate, the rest are token so my 6 year old son can watch them grow. He gets a real kick out of it. Made "stone soup" over the fire last summer, with only things from our garden. He thought that was pretty neat.

I grew up in the sticks, we had about 2 acres of garden (this is not a typo) and number of fruit trees as well as strawberrys, raspberries, and blackberries. As a kid, most of what I ate came from our garden as Mom canned tons of things for the winter months. My dad even grew popcorn. I have yet to meet another gardner that raised his own popcorn. Maybe someone here will have?

Sweet corn straight from the garden, hard to beat.

GL

Redsfan320
05-17-2010, 10:32 AM
We've also done cucumbers and okra once.

320

KoryMac5
05-17-2010, 10:34 AM
We just bought our home in March and the previous owner had a nice section for a garden to be planted. I decided to plant 2 rows of sweet corn, some lettuce, spinach, sweet and hot peppers, onions, carrots, cucumbers, broccoli, and some cauliflower. Plus we have a nice section of tomatoes and a place for some pumpkins and sunflowers. I used to help my father when I was younger with his garden however this is my first year growing on my own. I already survived the last frost we had so hopefully everything turns out well.

I would like to plant some asparagus and garlic as well but I may not have the room for it. Plus I believe asparagus takes a few years before you can harvest it. Good luck with your growing.

SunDeck
05-17-2010, 11:59 AM
I converted the back 1/4 of our yard to a garden area for my wife. She has an apple tree, about 75 strawberry plants, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, pole beans, tomatoes and basil, lettuce in at the moment. I built a cold frame for her to start seed in this spring, which worked much better than trying to start them indoors with a grow light last year.

gonelong
05-17-2010, 12:58 PM
...I decided to plant 2 rows of sweet corn....

I hate to be the messenger of bad news ... sweet corn needs to be planted in blocks, not long rows. The corn needs to pollinate (via the breeze) and it's much more likely to happen with 6 rows 1/3 the length than with 2 rows of any length.

IMO you'll be lucky to get anything edible out of either row. Likely, the ears will form, but will not mature.

GL

pedro
05-17-2010, 01:09 PM
I built a 3x6 raised bed last year. I'm growing chives (hold over from last year), cherry tomatoes, basil, cilantro, and parsley. I'm also going to grow some cucumbers in separate containers and have a raspberry bush that is about 15x3.

I'd like to grow peppers and full size tomatoes but they just don;t do very well here.

I also have a giant rosemary bush and some oregano in the front yard.

Redsfan320
05-17-2010, 01:56 PM
hate to be the messenger of bad news ... sweet corn needs to be planted in blocks, not long rows. The corn needs to pollinate (via the breeze) and it's much more likely to happen with 6 rows 1/3 the length than with 2 rows of any length.

IMO you'll be lucky to get anything edible out of either row. Likely, the ears will form, but will not mature.

This is true. We did ours in several rows and the "outside" ones didn't do near as well as the "inside" ones. Good luck!

320

LoganBuck
05-17-2010, 02:10 PM
I built a 3x6 raised bed last year. I'm growing chives (hold over from last year), cherry tomatoes, basil, cilantro, and parsley. I'm also going to grow some cucumbers in separate containers and have a raspberry bush that is about 15x3.

I'd like to grow peppers and full size tomatoes but they just don;t do very well here.

I also have a giant rosemary bush and some oregano in the front yard.

My wife's family has some relation in Seattle. They were at a wedding last year, and I was seated with them. They tried that stupid looking Topsy Turvy Tomato thing, and had good results. It may be too late for this year already but, keep it in mind. You can pick those things up at Walmart for about $20.

pedro
05-17-2010, 02:13 PM
My wife's family has some relation in Seattle. They were at a wedding last year, and I was seated with them. They tried that stupid looking Topsy Turvy Tomato thing, and had good results. It may be too late for this year already but, keep it in mind. You can pick those things up at Walmart for about $20.

I've been thinking about those, my neighbors just bought one.

I think it might still be worth it. I just planted my garden last week.

LoganBuck
05-17-2010, 02:17 PM
Corn is best grown in a square, or rectangle. You may be alright depending on prevailing winds, and rogue pollen. Are you near other gardens, or field corn?

I always put up about 6 rows of corn 60 feet long, 30" apart, on the end of a convenient field of conventional field corn. We eat alot off the cob, typically with a large cookout/late summer party, and then we harvest the remainder, cut it from the ear, and freeze the corn for use during the year.

dabvu2498
05-17-2010, 02:20 PM
I've been thinking about those, my neighbors just bought one.

I think it might still be worth it. I just planted my garden last week.

They're awesome. They look goofy, but you will grow better tomatos (and peppers).

westofyou
05-17-2010, 02:42 PM
My wife's family has some relation in Seattle. They were at a wedding last year, and I was seated with them. They tried that stupid looking Topsy Turvy Tomato thing, and had good results. It may be too late for this year already but, keep it in mind. You can pick those things up at Walmart for about $20.

We're going that route this year, it just ain't hot enough for the normal stuff on my lot (which is over 100 years old and classic in the city size) too many trees and bushes

KoryMac5
05-17-2010, 02:42 PM
I hate to be the messenger of bad news ... sweet corn needs to be planted in blocks, not long rows. The corn needs to pollinate (via the breeze) and it's much more likely to happen with 6 rows 1/3 the length than with 2 rows of any length.

IMO you'll be lucky to get anything edible out of either row. Likely, the ears will form, but will not mature.

GL

Thanks for the info. I believe I have enough room left over to expand to be able to get more of a rectangular shape that would be desired for ultimum corn growing. I should be able to get a third row out of my space which I beleive will help with polination I will give it a try and see what happens. Thanks for the catch.

Will M
05-17-2010, 03:02 PM
last year my wife planted a couple tomato & pepper plants.

this year i got involved. heh heh heh.
1. i have two areas of squash doing well
2. i made three raised beds. two with watermelon & one with pumpkin
3. my beans are doing well. i made the mistake of buying bush beans not pole beans but at least i don't have to build a trellis
4. we have several tomatoes & pepper plants scattered around
5. i have a few cucumber plants
6. i planted some carrots. too soon to tell
7. the peas i planted in the ground didn't come up but the ones i planted in pots did. i am going to transplant them soon

so far its been fun. mostly i am shocked when the seeds i planted actually grow. in the past i have had a bit of a 'brown thumb'.

for the most part i have gotten things at Walmart & Home Depot. since it started as a fun experiment i thought i'd start cheap & see if the plants actually grew

biggest problem so far is that the cats think my garden is a giant litter box!

redsmetz
05-17-2010, 07:13 PM
biggest problem so far is that the cats think my garden is a giant litter box!

I'm told if you sprinkle some cayenne pepper around, it should ward the cats off. Maybe someone else has an idea.

SunDeck
05-17-2010, 07:48 PM
When we moved in to this house the yard was a total disaster, which is probably why we got it so cheap. Curb appeal makes a big difference.

I removed a nine yard dumpster worth of brush and overgrown weed trees, including a massive hedge that blocked the patio and windows of the first floor. I regraded the yard to move water away from the house and found several tons of field stone that had been used to landscape over the years- they were reused to define beds, paths and to elevate a few beds near the house.

In the front, I re-landscaped the beds near the house, keeping only one plant, a mature holly. In the back yard, added another five yards of soil/compost for my wife's garden and built a new gravel path around the side of the house to that area (about five yards of gravel).

In the back yard I had a drainage problem- water running from my neighbor's yard and my gutters collected right in the middle of mine, then ran under a shed. To correct this, I needed to halt the neighbor's water at the fence and figure out a way to move water that was coming from the gutters over to the fence line and then around the shed. I built a large raised bed at the fence line (nine yards of topsoil), running the length of the fence between our yards. I filled along the fence with stones to control erosion. Then I fashioned a stone lined swale through the bed diagonally that diverted runoff from the gutters over to the fence line. These two runoff streams are normally dry, but when it rains the water rushes right through them, behind my shed and down to the gulley in the woods.
Both beds are now covered with ornamental grasses, viburnum, coreopsis, aster and butterfly bushes.

Redsfan320
05-17-2010, 08:48 PM
When we moved in to this house the yard was a total disaster, which is probably why we got it so cheap. Curb appeal makes a big difference.

I removed a nine yard dumpster worth of brush and overgrown weed trees, including a massive hedge that blocked the patio and windows of the first floor. I regraded the yard to move water away from the house and found several tons of field stone that had been used to landscape over the years- they were reused to define beds, paths and to elevate a few beds near the house.

In the front, I re-landscaped the beds near the house, keeping only one plant, a mature holly. In the back yard, added another five yards of soil/compost for my wife's garden and built a new gravel path around the side of the house to that area (about five yards of gravel).

In the back yard I had a drainage problem- water running from my neighbor's yard and my gutters collected right in the middle of mine, then ran under a shed. To correct this, I needed to halt the neighbor's water at the fence and figure out a way to move water that was coming from the gutters over to the fence line and then around the shed. I built a large raised bed at the fence line (nine yards of topsoil), running the length of the fence between our yards. I filled along the fence with stones to control erosion. Then I fashioned a stone lined swale through the bed diagonally that diverted runoff from the gutters over to the fence line. These two runoff streams are normally dry, but when it rains the water rushes right through them, behind my shed and down to the gulley in the woods.
Both beds are now covered with ornamental grasses, viburnum, coreopsis, aster and butterfly bushes.

Wow. Nice work!

320

Will M
05-17-2010, 11:22 PM
I'm told if you sprinkle some cayenne pepper around, it should ward the cats off. Maybe someone else has an idea.

thanks. i'll look into this.

LoganBuck
05-17-2010, 11:59 PM
Your cats, or stray/neighborhood cats?

Will M
05-18-2010, 02:32 AM
Your cats, or stray/neighborhood cats?

depends on when you ask :D

all four are adopted strays but have been ours for anywhere from 3 to 15 years.

RichRed
05-18-2010, 02:45 PM
When we moved in to this house the yard was a total disaster, which is probably why we got it so cheap. Curb appeal makes a big difference.

I removed a nine yard dumpster worth of brush and overgrown weed trees, including a massive hedge that blocked the patio and windows of the first floor. I regraded the yard to move water away from the house and found several tons of field stone that had been used to landscape over the years- they were reused to define beds, paths and to elevate a few beds near the house.

In the front, I re-landscaped the beds near the house, keeping only one plant, a mature holly. In the back yard, added another five yards of soil/compost for my wife's garden and built a new gravel path around the side of the house to that area (about five yards of gravel).

In the back yard I had a drainage problem- water running from my neighbor's yard and my gutters collected right in the middle of mine, then ran under a shed. To correct this, I needed to halt the neighbor's water at the fence and figure out a way to move water that was coming from the gutters over to the fence line and then around the shed. I built a large raised bed at the fence line (nine yards of topsoil), running the length of the fence between our yards. I filled along the fence with stones to control erosion. Then I fashioned a stone lined swale through the bed diagonally that diverted runoff from the gutters over to the fence line. These two runoff streams are normally dry, but when it rains the water rushes right through them, behind my shed and down to the gulley in the woods.
Both beds are now covered with ornamental grasses, viburnum, coreopsis, aster and butterfly bushes.

Get this guy his own HGTV show!

Roy Tucker
05-25-2010, 10:55 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/20/garden/20tomato.html?src=me&ref=general

redsmetz
06-16-2010, 01:41 PM
I thought I'd bump this thread up. Our garden has been coming in very nicely, although my wife has been battling some worms that show up on broccoli plants. Our tomatoes, beans, zucchini and pepper plants are all coming in nicely. The spinach is done and we got enough to use in some salads, quesadillas and stir fry. The basil and cilantro is also starting to look good. Probably about two to three weeks before some of the stuff is big and ripe enough to have some.

Roy Tucker
06-16-2010, 02:17 PM
We're about done with spinach, lettuce, and radishes too.

Most everything is doing well. We've had some biblical-proportion rain and hail the last few days which battered some of my tomato and pepper plants but they look OK now. My early girl tomatoes look about ready to produce (planted early).

Lots of rain and lots of humidity and lots of heat == a lot of weeds. They've been poking up through my grass mulch.

My rain gauge measured 5" between Saturday and this AM.

pedro
06-16-2010, 02:20 PM
It's 50 degrees here.

The cilantro and parsley love it. As do the slugs.

The basil, not so much.

Tomatoes? See you in August.

westofyou
06-16-2010, 02:21 PM
It's 50 degrees here.

The cilantro and parsley love it. As do the slugs.

The basil, not so much.

Tomatoes? See you in August.

Coldest June on record and it's not even 2/3rds over

gonelong
06-16-2010, 04:56 PM
Thanks for the info. I believe I have enough room left over to expand to be able to get more of a rectangular shape that would be desired for ultimum corn growing. I should be able to get a third row out of my space which I beleive will help with polination I will give it a try and see what happens. Thanks for the catch.

Out of the blue the other day, Dad tells me you can shake the tassels of one row and then spread them on the silk of the other and vice versa. He said this would do the trick when mother nature and sparse plantings would not. Do this when the silk first begins to show.

Thanks pop. He lets me fail with sweet corn 3 years running and hands you the answer on a silver platter. *sigh* :)

GL

gonelong
06-16-2010, 04:56 PM
Strawberrys were Deeeeeeelicious this year. Great conditions in our neck of the woods.

GL

redsmetz
06-25-2010, 01:07 PM
I love having some fresh herbs in our garden. My wife planted to railing boxes; one with cilantro, the other with basil. Today for lunch, I reheated some black bean flautas I'd made the other night and topped them off with some fresh cilantro. Yum.

gonelong
06-25-2010, 01:51 PM
Dad tells me you can shake the tassels of one row and then spread them on the silk of the other and vice versa.

Dad said an envelope is ideal for this.

GL

redsmetz
06-25-2010, 01:57 PM
Out of the blue the other day, Dad tells me you can shake the tassels of one row and then spread them on the silk of the other and vice versa. He said this would do the trick when mother nature and sparse plantings would not. Do this when the silk first begins to show.

Thanks pop. He lets me fail with sweet corn 3 years running and hands you the answer on a silver platter. *sigh* :)

GL

Yeah, but at least he finally has "the talk" out of the way, no?

Roy Tucker
06-25-2010, 02:24 PM
I love having some fresh herbs in our garden. My wife planted to railing boxes; one with cilantro, the other with basil. Today for lunch, I reheated some black bean flautas I'd made the other night and topped them off with some fresh cilantro. Yum.

I've got lots of basil plants growing in the out-gardens plus a lot of parsley, mint, and sage. Nothing like a mojito using mint just minutes out of the garden.

Garlic and shallots over in the south bed that aren't quite there yet.

On the patio, I've got a baker's rack with little pots of rosemary, thyme, tarragon, oregano, and a basil plant.

The herbs off the baker's rack get used almost nightly. Sometimes we need to give them a rest because we strip them quicker that they grow. Grilled a nice tilapia the other night with basil, parsley, and something else that I forget in butter and lemon juice for basting.

Salads get whatever herbs are plentiful. We're back to store-bought lettuce now. It got too hot for our lettuce plants but we had a nice 2 month run of hand-picked lettuce for dinner salads (which was a pain with all this rain, i.e. who goes out in the rain to pick it).

redsmetz
06-25-2010, 02:40 PM
Roy, what are "Bakers Racks" - can you post a picture?

Roy Tucker
06-25-2010, 03:17 PM
Basically, a tall shelving unit that goes against a wall. Something like this....

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61qWBWfAXJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Will M
06-25-2010, 03:41 PM
My bush beans are producing a lot. More than we can eat right now. Same with my cucumber plants.

The squash have started to produce as well as the tomatoes.

Its quite a lot of fun for me. I haven't had a garden since I was a kid.

Its been a very sunny (and hot) spring here in Cincinnati. It hasn't seemed to rain that much but I have been watering my plants every day it hasn't rained. Add a little miracle grow once a week & viola!

Roy Tucker
06-26-2010, 12:13 PM
A garden-related note....

The Newport garden walk is this weekend, today and tomorrow 10-4. A big fave of Mr. and Mrs. Tucker. Great stuff if you like gardens and landscaping in very small city spaces.

http://www.eastrowgardenclub.org/

VR
06-26-2010, 12:26 PM
It's 50 degrees here.

The cilantro and parsley love it. As do the slugs.

The basil, not so much.

Tomatoes? See you in August.

We just planted our garden this week.

redsmetz
08-12-2010, 12:40 PM
Figured I'd bump this up. The tomatoes are going gangbusters, as are the cherry tomatoes (including a volunteer plant that shot up among our green beans!). My wife just did a new planting of green beans too.

Our basil has been plentiful. I made some pesto last week with it and last night made up a recipe I found of ravioli with tomatoes and pesto (mixed with more olive oil & fresh pepper). We used the cherry tomatoes we'd picked. Topped the meal off with the last of the first batch of green beans.

Green & red peppers are getting plentiful too.

Roy Tucker
08-12-2010, 01:40 PM
Figured I'd bump this up. The tomatoes are going gangbusters, as are the cherry tomatoes (including a volunteer plant that shot up among our green beans!). My wife just did a new planting of green beans too.

Our basil has been plentiful. I made some pesto last week with it and last night made up a recipe I found of ravioli with tomatoes and pesto (mixed with more olive oil & fresh pepper). We used the cherry tomatoes we'd picked. Topped the meal off with the last of the first batch of green beans.

Green & red peppers are getting plentiful too.

Yep, that sounds like our garden. We've been using basil like lettuce we've got so much.

We've got a Brandywine tomato plant that I have to save the seeds of. We've been getting 1-2 large beefy really great tomatoes off it per day. Big dark green plant. I need to saves its DNA.

SunDeck
08-15-2010, 11:36 AM
Terrible year here. Last year we had no problem with deer, but this year they came in an ravaged my wife's beans. She was crest fallen- I'm building new fences for next year.
On the up side, we had great strawberries, and we put in raspberries and blueberries. The deer didn't touch them. And they don't like basil either, so we've had mounds of pesto.

OUReds
04-16-2012, 11:19 PM
Without further delay, I present my 2012 tomato grow list!

Raised Bed #1
2 - Aunt Ruby's German Green
Green when ripe. New to me.
2 - KBX
Orange tomato. Absolutely delicious, but not good production last year. Getting a better spot this time.
1 - Lucky Cross
Red/Yellow striped bi-color. New to me.
1 - J.D.'s Special C-Tex
Newish black tomato that's the new hotness in heirloom circles. Not a huge fan of dark tomatoes but thought I'd give it a trial.

Raised Bed #2
2 - Marianna's Peace
Absolutely the finest tasting tomato on the planet imho. Pink colored.
2 - Daniels
New to me pink colored tomato. Better be good as I bumped another favorite of mine (stump of the world) this year to grow it.
2 - Earl's Faux
New to me pink tomato.

In-Ground
2 - Big Beef
Red, the best hybrid I've grown. Decent taste, good production and disease resistance.
1 - Eva Purple Ball
New to me pink main cropper.
1 - Jaune Flamme
An earlyish orange saladette sized tomato. Some people swear by it.
1 - Azoychka
An earlyish yellow tomato.

I'll have room for a few more, maybe another dark and a cherry. Also have plans for 10 peppers this year, probably 3 Jalapenos, 3 Serranos, 3 Cayennes (hope to make my own hot sauce this year just for fun), and a sweet banana.

Onions and lettuce are planted, beds are turned over and fertilized. Can't wait for another growing season!

LoganBuck
04-16-2012, 11:34 PM
My lettuce failed, I didn't water it. Time to start over.

Roy Tucker
04-17-2012, 01:52 AM
We had a bit of a dry spell too and my lettuce and spinach are just ok. I don't ever remember having to water this early.

I have a couple early girls in-ground with my walls of water around them. Covered with a frisbee on the frost nights. OUReds, I am in awe of your tomatoes.

OUReds
04-17-2012, 10:16 AM
There's time to plant lettuce and get a good crop before the real heat hits happily.

Thanks Roy, though don't be too in awe, they aren't even in the ground yet! Last year was a great year, some of the plants topped 8 foot. Nothing makes life worth living more then a home grown tomato in August.

redsmetz
04-18-2012, 09:43 PM
My wife has the spinach in and she planted the broccoli last weekend. I think this Saturday I'll turn the beds and we'll try to get more in. We have a number of zucchini volunteers that we're going to see how they go. We're having our porch rebuilt this weekend and we've asked him to put wider railings on so we can put our herb window boxes there. Anxious for the basil to come in.

Redsfaithful
04-18-2012, 09:55 PM
Anyone ever have a landscape consultant out to tell you what to plant for landscaping? i.e. what would do best, etc. My front and back yards are pretty filled in, but I'd like to add some things and maximize the likelihood the plants will survive. Can't decide if it would be worth the expense though.

gonelong
05-04-2012, 11:31 AM
12 ft x 12 ft garden is fully in now ...
* Planted 4-5 rows of Jade Green beans
* 6 Yukon Gold potatos
* 2 Beefsteak Tomatos
* 5 various peppers
* 1 Rhubarb
* 1 Zuchinni
* 2 cucumbers
* 2 onions
* "volunteer" lettuce that must have seeded from last year that is being harvested
* A metic crap-load of strawberrys are hanging off every plant. [dools]

Garden is a bit tight this year, we'll see how that affects growth/output

I also have some strawberrys alongside the house in between the flowers as ground cover.

GL

Roy Tucker
05-05-2012, 08:00 AM
Anyone ever have a landscape consultant out to tell you what to plant for landscaping? i.e. what would do best, etc. My front and back yards are pretty filled in, but I'd like to add some things and maximize the likelihood the plants will survive. Can't decide if it would be worth the expense though.

Lots of times, they'll do this for free. Especially in off-season times. I'd call around and see if anyone does. We had one out when we first moved into our house (21 years ago). She sketched out a plan for us with shaped beds and suggestions as to what to plant where.

I've got a built-in consultant though. My wife has worked at Greenfield Plant Farm off and on for the last 15 years. Our yard is slowly going from a sun yard to a shade one. The spindly little trees we planted 21 years ago have matured into very nice (and shady) trees. Just got a winter king hawthorn for the last open spot.

lidspinner
05-07-2012, 10:14 AM
we put out 30 tomato plants, different types....most Mr Stripey, Cherokee Purple and Beefsteak.....around 10 broccoli and 10 cauliflower....6 yellow squash, 6 zuchinni, 6 cucumbers, 6 huge wide rows of bush beans stringless, 8 melons, a small strawberry bed, some lettuce, celery, eggplant and carrots....we have some acreage in another part of our county where we plant about 2 acres of sweet corn...usually bodacious and silver queen....tried a small plot of "gotta have it" from guerneys this year...

we love to can beans, corn, and make strawberry jam, we eat all of what we grow and give tons away to the neighbors....I have been trying the get the wife to let me turn the front yard into a veggie garden, I think outlining the front yard with corn would look sweet, then throughout the yard plant green beans and some cover crops for wheats or ryes.....kind of like going green so we wont have to mow the yard anymore....but she doesnt see it that way..lol

lidspinner
05-07-2012, 10:36 AM
has anyone here grown horseradish? been thinking of trying to grow some of that but I only have a small spot for root veggies that grow well...right now I use that spot for my asparagus and carrots....potatoes are grown above ground on newspapers with straw and horse manure and dirt....anyone that has ever grown potatoes in ground or in bags truly needs to try this method that I am using....you will pick more potatoes than you ever imagined possible.

anyhow, the horseradish, I know it grows underground but I am kind of wondering how deep it needs to go? I have one spot for root veggies that I keep very well maintained with compost and try to keep that dirt fluffy like powder and I hate to take up room with the horseradish if its tough to grow or needs alot of care. any tips growers?

Redsfaithful
05-07-2012, 03:21 PM
Lots of times, they'll do this for free. Especially in off-season times. I'd call around and see if anyone does. We had one out when we first moved into our house (21 years ago). She sketched out a plan for us with shaped beds and suggestions as to what to plant where.

Thanks Roy. We decided to mostly just go with what we have now and add more of the same to blank spots. I am looking into planting a tree between the sidewalk and road though (we have one, I'd like another), and I'll probably have a nursery do it.

Hoosier Red
05-07-2012, 06:22 PM
Thanks Roy. We decided to mostly just go with what we have now and add more of the same to blank spots. I am looking into planting a tree between the sidewalk and road though (we have one, I'd like another), and I'll probably have a nursery do it.

Another decent way to get free service is to ask around at the Master Gardner classes. A lot of times the people interested in that certification need to do a few plans in order to show off their stuff.

OUReds
07-01-2012, 11:06 PM
You know that crazy neighbor who is constantly trying to foist tomatoes and zucchini on you. That's me.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8365.jpg

First raised bed with 2 Marianna's Peace, 2 Stump of the World, 1 Daniels, and 1 Pruden's Purple.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8366.jpg

This is my second raised bed, new for this year, with 2 Aunt Ruby's German Greens, 2 Persimmons, 1 Lucky Cross, and 1 JD's Special C-Tex.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8369.jpg

In ground tomatoes, which I will raise next year if all goes well. 1 Sungold, 4 Big Beef, 1 Black Krim, and 1 Jaune Flamme.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8367.jpg

Aunt Ruby's German Green cluster. This plant today won the race to reach the top of the Texas tomato cage.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8368.jpg

Black Krim cluster. My most productive setter so far this year, there's probably 20 greenies hanging out on the plant.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8370.jpg

My pepper patch, they need tied up after the storms here.

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8372.jpg

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s116/hwlegend/DSCN8373.jpg

redsmetz
07-02-2012, 10:08 AM
OUReds, what's the pepper you're growing there? I see it says "Garden Salsa," but I'd like to hear more about it. And is that cantaloupe in the last picture? We've got a couple of plants growing that are likely cantaloupes. They were volunteers that starting growing when I put compost in the garden, so we'll see how those go.

My wife's been picking green beans and froze the first bag this weekend. When the power went out last night, with the possibility that it wouldn't be back on until tonight (it's back on now instead), I took everything from our freezer and refrigerator and moved it down to a walk in cooler here where my office is (3 blocks away), so we saved all that. We've also been getting the broccoli and I need to cook some of that this week. I also picked the first basil which we'll use in a potato & green bean salad, making a pesto that it's tossed in.

OUReds
07-02-2012, 04:08 PM
Garden salsa is a relatively mild hot pepper hybrid bred for use in, you guessed it, salsa. Heat is supposed to be maybe half that of a jalapeno. I've never grown it, so I'm afraid that's all I know about it. I like to put different kinds of peppers in my salsa so I'd thought I'd give it a shot.

The final picture is a cucumber plant.

Sounds like you're having a good growing season so far redsmetz, hope it finishes as well as it began!

redsmetz
07-03-2012, 09:52 AM
Garden salsa is a relatively mild hot pepper hybrid bred for use in, you guessed it, salsa. Heat is supposed to be maybe half that of a jalapeno. I've never grown it, so I'm afraid that's all I know about it. I like to put different kinds of peppers in my salsa so I'd thought I'd give it a shot.

The final picture is a cucumber plant.

Sounds like you're having a good growing season so far redsmetz, hope it finishes as well as it began!

Hmmm, I sent your cucumber picture to my wife. I'm wondering if that's what we have growing. I'll post a picture of the one we have when I stop up at the house to get my car in an hour or so. Let me know what you think.

My wife gets the overall credit. I do some digging and help her plant stuff, but it's really her baby. And I love to eat it.

Tonight we'll be using some of the fresh green beans to make the potato & green bean salad with pesto that I mentioned. We'll have that with some of the fresh broccoli and with a vegetarian BBQ (or Sloppy Joes as most folks call it). My wife's vegetarian, so this I came up with to still have BBQ sandwiches, as we call it around these parts.

redsmetz
07-03-2012, 10:46 AM
Well the mystery plant is bearing some fruit, so the question is, what will it be? My wife researched based on the leaves and thought perhaps it is a cantaloupe. OUReds plant looks much like this (although our leaves may be a different size) and that's cucumber.

So here's the pic of the early growth. What do folks think?

http://i831.photobucket.com/albums/zz232/metzfamily/MysteryPlant.jpg

OUReds
07-03-2012, 12:02 PM
I think it is a cucumber, but all the curbits look very similar, so there's no way to be sure that I know untill the fruit ripens.