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View Full Version : For you people 10+ years removed from College, do you ever open a textbook?



Kingspoint
06-24-2010, 03:14 AM
For example, I'll open a Trigonometry book once in a while and do exercises, even though it's not a College book. Sometimes I'll open my Chemistry books and Physics books and refresh through some pages (like isotopes, Quantum Physics, half-life, universe stuff).

With math, if you don't use it you lose it.

reds1869
06-24-2010, 10:02 AM
I do the same thing occasionally with my psychology texts. You are right, there are a lot of things that if you don't use them you lose them. In day to day life I tend to work with the same limited set of information, ignoring all the other periphery ideas I once learned. Because I love learning I tend to refresh my memory by reading academic literature. If I can have fun and buffer my knowledge it is a great day.

westofyou
06-24-2010, 10:43 AM
I went to film school, didn't have to buy books for the last 2 years of school.

Spazzrico
06-24-2010, 10:50 AM
I do, but i'm a college professor.....So I don't count. :D

Johnny Footstool
06-24-2010, 10:54 AM
I saved a few English lit books, including a Norton Anthology or two. They're great for filling up bookshelves. I never bother cracking them open, though.

bucksfan2
06-24-2010, 11:09 AM
6 years removed from college. I sold most of my books back because I didn't think I would use them again. I did save a CIS book that was basically how to use Microsoft Excel. I open up from time to time for excel formula help.

UKFlounder
06-24-2010, 11:20 AM
No, but a lot of the books I like to read are historical non-fiction, some of which are similar to books assigned for reading in collegiate history classes.

redsmetz
06-24-2010, 11:47 AM
I last took a college course in 1980 after leaving full time school in 1975 and some night school at UC over a couple of other years. The class 1980 was a German class. I haven't looked at a college textbook since, although I've resold some of my kids books in recent years.

But... and this scares the daylights out of my wife, I've been hankering to go back and finish a degree. Don't know what degree that would be because I never actually had a declared major (I always said I majored in "undecided"), but I'd like to be able to say that I'm a college graduate. My son will graduate next year, so all three kids will then be college graduates. My wife has a masters and I always joke I could use her bachelors degree since she has the other one. I talked to UC about a year ago and they had to pull my transcripts out of storage since the computers didn't go back that far. They told me most of my credits were not "fragile", meaning they'd transfer to a degree today. I'm thinking some time this summer I may go up and talk to a counselor and see what I need and what a course of action would be. Don't know if I can swing it financially etc, but I'd love to do it by 2013, 40 years after I started college. Now I just need to figure out how to convince my wife...

[BTW, I don't need the degree, I've owned my own business for over 30 years and have learned while doing the work I do]

Degenerate39
06-24-2010, 04:04 PM
I'm in college and I never open textbooks :D

reds1869
06-24-2010, 04:20 PM
I'm in college and I never open textbooks :D

Here's a secret: neither did most of us!
:beerme:

pahster
06-24-2010, 06:09 PM
Here's a secret: neither did most of us!
:beerme:

As someone who spends far too much time grading tests, essays, and other assignments, let me assure you that this is no secret. ;)

Will M
06-24-2010, 09:29 PM
In my career as a general internist I use what is basically an internet textbook on a daily basis. whenever i have to treat a disease process that I haven't seen in a long time I'll review the diagnosis & Treatment plan. whenever i encounter a medication that is new I have to read up on it.
then about once every 10 years I'll read the ole Internal Medicine textbook cover to cover.

For non work related knowledge I read a lot more non fiction than the average joe. A textbook on anything from anthropology to religion to astrophysics is a good place to learn the basics. If I find myself especially interested in a subject then I'll search out books on the more focused topic.
Used college textbooks at Half Price Books tend to be fairly cheap.

Certain texts or courses tend to be tailored to the 'intelligent layman'. Think of taking a history course as a chemistry major or vice versa. The CD/DVD courses by The Teaching Company are modelled in this fashion. These are really good if you have long drives to & from work.

Red in Chicago
06-24-2010, 10:12 PM
I've been out of school for about 20 years. I kept my books for a few years, but never opened them after graduation day. My degree is in Business Management, but I don't work in that field.

Been thinking about taking a foreign language at one of the local colleges, but can't get motivated to do so.

Kingspoint
06-25-2010, 12:05 AM
As someone who spends far too much time grading tests, essays, and other assignments, let me assure you that this is no secret. ;)

:D

reds1869
06-25-2010, 12:08 AM
As someone who spends far too much time grading tests, essays, and other assignments, let me assure you that this is no secret. ;)

So true! I left the world of grading papers behind last year and don't miss it one bit. Punctuation and spelling are fading art forms. :D

kaldaniels
06-25-2010, 01:16 AM
In my career as a general internist I use what is basically an internet textbook on a daily basis. whenever i have to treat a disease process that I haven't seen in a long time I'll review the diagnosis & Treatment plan. whenever i encounter a medication that is new I have to read up on it.
then about once every 10 years I'll read the ole Internal Medicine textbook cover to cover.

For non work related knowledge I read a lot more non fiction than the average joe. A textbook on anything from anthropology to religion to astrophysics is a good place to learn the basics. If I find myself especially interested in a subject then I'll search out books on the more focused topic.
Used college textbooks at Half Price Books tend to be fairly cheap.

Certain texts or courses tend to be tailored to the 'intelligent layman'. Think of taking a history course as a chemistry major or vice versa. The CD/DVD courses by The Teaching Company are modelled in this fashion. These are really good if you have long drives to & from work.

Goodwill usually has a bunch of old textbooks too FWIW.

Dom Heffner
06-25-2010, 04:13 PM
Just read an entire college textbook on Original Intent.

Not the most entertaining read, but I labored through it.

And learned that Marbury v Madison was a lousily decided case. Never picked up on that fact through college, since I was focused more on the "establishing judicial review" aspect.

durl
06-25-2010, 04:58 PM
Nope. But I watch History Channel and Science Channel a LOT so I figure that counts for something. :cool:

Kingspoint
06-25-2010, 10:34 PM
Just read an entire college textbook on Original Intent.

Not the most entertaining read, but I labored through it.

And learned that Marbury v Madison was a lousily decided case. Never picked up on that fact through college, since I was focused more on the "establishing judicial review" aspect.

That's very difficult to do for me. My ADD really kicks in whenever I start reading cases. See Stuart v. Laird (1803). See Eakin v. Raub (Pa., 1825). See Dr. Bonham's Case (1610). See The Federalist no. 78 (1788). See Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857). Etc., etc., etc. I'm reading every pertinent case to try to get a better feel for just one case. It's very difficult to read cover-to-cover in a textbook.